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Document 52012DC0385

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on the implementation of Directive 2003/59/EC relating to the initial qualification and periodic training of drivers of certain road vehicles for the carriage of goods or passengers

/* COM/2012/0385 final */

52012DC0385

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on the implementation of Directive 2003/59/EC relating to the initial qualification and periodic training of drivers of certain road vehicles for the carriage of goods or passengers /* COM/2012/0385 final */


TABLE OF CONTENTS

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS on the implementation of Directive 2003/59/EC relating to the initial qualification and periodic training of drivers of certain road vehicles for the carriage of goods or passengers .............................. 3

1................ General information................................................................................................................................................. 3

1.1............. Introduction............................................................................................................................................................. 3

1.2............. Directive 2003/59/EC — basic elements............................................................................................................... 3

1.3............. Transposition of Directive 2003/59/EC................................................................................................................ 3

2................ Implementation of Directive 2003/59/EC.............................................................................................................. 4

2.1............. Scope of the Directive — Article 1....................................................................................................................... 4

2.2............. Exemptions — Article 2.......................................................................................................................................... 4

2.3............. Qualification and training — Article 3................................................................................................................. 5

2.3.1.......... Compulsory initial qualification............................................................................................................................ 5

2.3.1.1....... Option combining both course attendance and a test...................................................................................... 5

2.3.1.2....... Option involving tests............................................................................................................................................ 5

2.3.1.3....... Accelerated initial qualification............................................................................................................................. 6

2.3.2.......... Compulsory periodic training................................................................................................................................ 7

2.3.3.......... Organisation of the training................................................................................................................................... 7

2.3.4.......... Approval of the training centres........................................................................................................................... 7

2.4............. Acquired rights — Article 4.................................................................................................................................. 7

2.5............. Initial qualification — Article 5............................................................................................................................. 8

2.6............. CPC certifying initial qualification — Article 6................................................................................................. 10

2.7............. Periodic training — Article 7............................................................................................................................... 10

2.8............. CPC certifying periodic training — Article 8..................................................................................................... 11

2.9............. Place of training — Article 9................................................................................................................................ 11

2.10........... Community code — Article 10............................................................................................................................ 12

2.11........... Minimum qualification and training requirements — Annex I....................................................................... 13

3................ Conclusions and recommendations................................................................................................................... 13

3.1............. General evaluation of the application of Directive 2003/59/EC...................................................................... 13

3.2............. Main aspects to be improved and recommendations...................................................................................... 14

Annex......................................................................................................................................................................................... 15

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS

on the implementation of Directive 2003/59/EC relating to the initial qualification and periodic training of drivers of certain road vehicles for the carriage of goods or passengers

1.           General information

1.1.        Introduction

Under Article 13 of Directive 2003/59/EC[1], the Commission is to submit a report to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions making an initial evaluation of the implementation of the Directive, in particular with regard to the equivalence of the various initial qualification systems provided for in Article 3 and their efficiency.

This report is based on the answers provided by the Member States and by Norway to a questionnaire distributed to the national authorities in February 2011.

Most of the Member States gave complete answers to the questions addressed. However, some did not possess all the necessary data to provide all the information.

1.2.        Directive 2003/59/EC — basic elements

Directive 2003/59/EC on the initial qualification and periodic training of drivers of trucks or buses was adopted to ensure a common level of training for such drivers with a view to enhancing road safety in Europe.

It establishes the mandatory initial qualification and periodic training for professional drivers who are nationals of Member States or who are working for an undertaking based in the European Union. They aim to ensure that professional drivers have the necessary qualifications to drive vehicles. The initial qualification and periodic training are attested by a certificate issued to drivers, called the Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC).

The training is organised by training centres approved by the Member States.

1.3.        Transposition of Directive 2003/59/EC

Under Article 14, the deadline for transposition of the Directive expired on 10 September 2006.

The deadline for implementation of the initial qualification expired on 10 September 2008 for drivers holding a category D1, D1+E, D or D+E (buses) driving licence and on 10 September 2009 for drivers holding a category C1, C1+E, C or C+E (truck) driving licence.

All Member States have transposed and implemented the Directive.

2.           Implementation of Directive 2003/59/EC

2.1.        Scope of the Directive — Article 1

The Directive applies to the ‘activity of driving’ carried out by drivers who are nationals of a Member State or nationals of third countries employed by an undertaking established in a Member State, and use vehicles for which a category C or D driving licence is required.

It is estimated that the Directive covers the drivers of approximately six million vehicles in Europe[2].

Data coverage concerning the number of drivers from third countries is incomplete or insufficient. Where available, the numbers are in most cases very low compared to the total population of drivers[3].

In the majority of Member States, Certificates of Professional Competence certifying the initial qualification issued for C driver licences are more common than those issued for D driver licences.

2.2.        Exemptions — Article 2

The Directive excludes several categories of drivers from its scope[4].

The majority of Member States fully apply the exemptions under Article 2. However, Romania does not apply the exemptions referred to in Article 2(e), (f) and (g). Norway applies all the exemptions except 2(f): ‘vehicles used for non-commercial carriage or passengers of goods, for personal use’.

According to Article 2(g), ‘This Directive shall not apply to the drivers of vehicles carrying material or equipment to be used by the driver in the course of his or her work, provided that driving the vehicle is not the driver’s principal activity’. The implementation of this exemption has led, for some categories of drivers[5] (e.g. crane drivers, mechanics driving vehicles that transport broken-down agricultural machinery, etc.), to divergent interpretations: the drivers concerned apply to be exempted but the public administrations still want to include them within the scope of the Directive. Some guidelines to clarify the issue may be useful.

2.3.        Qualification and training — Article 3

Under Article 3, the activity of driving is subject to a compulsory initial qualification and periodic training.

Section 1 of Annex 1 describes the subjects to be covered by the training.

The subjects are organised around three main themes: ‘Advanced training in rational driving based on safety regulations’, ‘Application of regulations’, and ‘Health, road and environmental safety, service, logistics’.

These themes are organised into objectives on the basis of the driving licence they refer to.

2.3.1.     Compulsory initial qualification

Member States are expected to establish a system of initial qualification consisting either in course attendance with a test or in a theoretical and a practical test.

2.3.1.1.  Option combining both course attendance and a test

Under the first option, the initial qualification must include a course covering all the subjects listed in Section 1 of Annex 1. Each trainee driver must also drive for at least 20 hours individually in a vehicle which meets the requirements for test vehicles as defined in Directive 91/439/EEC[6]. The duration of the training is 280 hours. It should be underlined that this training is not to be combined with training for other types of qualifications (e.g. hazardous goods transport).

At the end of the training, the competent authorities set the driver a written or oral test. The test must include at least one question on each of the objectives for the subjects listed in section 1 of Annex 1.

2.3.1.2.  Option involving tests

Under the second option, the competent authorities organise theoretical and practical tests to check whether the trainee driver has the necessary level of knowledge required in Section 1 of Annex 1 for the subjects and objectives listed there.

As mentioned in point 2.2 of Annex I, the theoretical test consists of at least two parts: multiple-choice questions, questions requiring a direct answer, or a combination of both, and case studies. The minimum duration of the theoretical test is 4 hours.

The practical test consists of two parts: a 90-minute driving test to assess the training in rational driving, based on safety regulations, and a practical test covering at least the ability to load the vehicle (driving licences C and D), the ability to ensure the comfort and safety of passengers (D), the ability to prevent criminality (C, D), the ability to prevent physical risk (C, D) and the ability to assess emergency situations (C, D).

The minimum duration of this test is 30 minutes.

Fifteen Member States and Norway have opted for the combination of course and test while 11 Member States employ the theoretical and practical tests. Germany has implemented both options in national law and the driver can choose (Table 1).

Table 1 — The system of initial qualification in the Member States and in Norway

Tests only || Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, United Kingdom

Course and test || Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden

Both || Germany

Member States cooperate with various organisations that keep the data for the initial qualification and the periodic training, such as national and regional authorities[7], administrations[8], agencies[9], directorates[10], ministries concerned with transport and road safety[11], state enterprises[12], and special centres established for this purpose[13].

2.3.1.3.  Accelerated initial qualification

The initial qualification can be accelerated, based on a compulsory 140-hour course and a test and certified by a CPC.

Each trainee must drive for at least ten hours individually.

At the end of the training, the competent authorities set the driver a written or oral test. The test must include at least one question on each of the objectives for the subjects listed in Section 1 of Annex 1.

The accelerated initial qualification, which remains optional, is offered by 19 Member States and by Norway (see Table 2).

Table 2 — The accelerated initial qualification in the Member States and Norway

Member States that offer the accelerated initial qualification || Bulgaria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Norway

Member States that do not offer the accelerated initial qualification || Austria, Cyprus, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands United Kingdom

Under the Directive, a Member State may also authorise a driver to drive on its territory before obtaining a CPC.

2.3.2.     Compulsory periodic training

Members States are expected to establish a system of periodic training based on compulsory course attendance, certified by a CPC.

2.3.3.     Organisation of the training

The training is generally provided by driving schools, but it can also be provided by non- profit bodies, vocational schools, vocational colleges, high schools[14], or secondary schools[15].

In some Member States[16] the training is partially funded by the public sector.

2.3.4.     Approval of the training centres

Under Section 5 of Annex 1, the training centres providing the initial qualification and periodic training must be approved by the Member States’ competent authorities. Approval may be given only in response to a written application. The application must be accompanied by documents on the training programme and teaching methods; the instructors’ qualifications; the premises where the courses are given, the vehicle fleet used; and the number of participants.

The competent authority will give approval in writing provided that the training is given in accordance with the documents accompanying the application.

It is entitled to send authorised persons to be present at the training courses.

2.4.        Acquired rights — Article 4

The Directive exempts from the requirement to obtain the initial qualification any drivers who hold a category D driving licence issued before September 2008 and drivers who hold a category C driving licence issued before September 2009.

No major difficulty has been reported with recognition of the acquired rights of national and non-national drivers by the enforcement authorities.

The national administrations have provided information to the enforcement system by e.g. circulating the Directive and transposition laws, organising ad hoc training and meetings with police officers, sending letters and administrative acts, publishing guides on the internet, etc. In some Member States, the regulations have been issued for public consultation, and the police was one of the consultative bodies in the hearing process [17]. In addition, the enforcement authority in Romania and Norway is also the body that issues the CPC.

The enforcement authorities may use many means to verify the acquired rights of national and non-national drivers, in particular by checking the date when the driving licence was issued or its authenticity. They can also contact the issuing authority or consult, where available, the database containing the data for the initial qualification and periodic training.

According to the Member States, this aspect of the Directive does not create any major problem. However, a difficulty arises when the driving licence is renewed and no longer contains the date when it was issued for the first time. There is also uncertainty as to how to enforce regulations because the various Member States and Norway are at different stages in applying the Directive. This situation concerns only a few drivers and is easily solved by the direct exchange of information between national authorities.

2.5.        Initial qualification — Article 5

The Directive establishes the minimum age for driving vehicles intended for the carriage of goods or passengers, in accordance with different criteria such as the driving licence category, the duration of the training to obtain the initial qualification, and the distance travelled.

Table 3 — Summary of requirements concerning the initial qualification for new drivers (Art. 5)

Vehicle || Licence requirement || CPC requirement || Age

Carriage of goods || C — C+E || Normal || 18

C1 — C1+E || Accelerated || 18

C — C+E || Accelerated || 21

Carriage of passengers || D — D+E On regular services and route ≤ 50 km || Normal || 18 Within their territory

Accelerated || 21

D — D+E || Normal || 21

20 within their territory. It can be reduced to 18 when there are no passengers.

Accelerated || 23

|| D1 — D1+E || Normal || 18 Within their territory

|| || Accelerated || 21

Obtaining an initial qualification does not require the corresponding driving licence to be obtained beforehand.

Therefore, in 13 Member States and in Norway[18], the initial qualification can be combined with training to obtain the driving licence (see Table 4).

Table 4 — Combination of C or D driving licence training and the initial qualification in the Member States and Norway

Member States that combine the C or D driving licence training and the initial qualification || Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Netherlands (partially), Norway, Sweden, United Kingdom

Member States that do not combine the C or D driving licence training and the initial qualification || Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Italy, Luxembourg, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain

Some of the Member States that combine the driving licence training and the initial qualification have opted to combine training for C and D driving licences with both the initial qualification and the accelerated initial qualification, while others require trainees to have achieved a certain degree of progress in the driving licence programme before starting on the initial qualification.

Concerning the issuing of a CPC before the corresponding driving licence is obtained, the majority of Member States do not allow this. However, Belgium accepts this for combined training, Austria requires only the theoretical test to be passed in advance, and Lithuania requires the driver to possess only a B category driving licence. Although, in general, Norway requires a driving licence to be held before a CPC is issued, it exempts drivers undergoing a vocational apprenticeship or traineeship.

2.6.        CPC certifying initial qualification — Article 6

The Member States issue the CPC to drivers who have attended the training and passed the test or who have passed the theoretical and practical tests, depending on the option chosen.

If a Member State has chosen the option consisting in the course and test, or the accelerated initial qualification, the training course covers the subjects listed in Section 1 of Annex 1 of the Directive. It is followed by a written or oral test.

If a Member State opts for just the tests, the drivers must pass the theoretical and practical tests as described in point 2.2 of Annex 1.

Member States have not reported any difficulties concerning the implementation of the Article.

2.7.        Periodic training — Article 7

Periodic training should enable drivers to update the knowledge essential for their work. It aims to expand on and review some of the subjects described in section 1 of Annex I.

The duration of the periodic training is 35 hours every five years, given in sessions of at least seven hours, as mentioned in Section 4 of Annex I.

The majority of Member States allow drivers to attend single sessions of seven hours. However, they set specific requirements mainly as to the period of time within which the 35 hours of training should be completed.

For some Member States, this period can be 12, 6 or 3 months, even one week[19]. Other Member States have also specified the number of 7-hour sessions into which the training is divided: e.g. two course sessions of 7 hours, two separate modules comprising 3 training days for 7 hours and 2 training days for 7 hours, 5 consecutive days or two sessions of 3 days and 2 days, respectively[20], etc.

2.8.        CPC certifying periodic training — Article 8

Members States issue the CPC to drivers who have completed the periodic training.

The periodic training must be taken by new drivers within five years after obtaining the CPC for initial qualification, and by drivers who hold acquired rights, following the timetable set by their Member States.

The Directive exempts from the requirement to obtain the initial qualification any drivers who hold a category D driving licence issued before September 2008 and drivers who hold a category C driving licence issued before September 2009. For drivers with such acquired rights, Member States have adopted national timetables for completing the first course of periodic training by the deadline of 2015 (category D driving licence) and 2016 (category C driving licence).

Mutual recognition of the transitional periods decided by the Member States has been agreed[21]. Accordingly, until the deadline of 2015 (vehicle category D) and 2016 (vehicle category C), drivers cannot be penalised in any Member State for not having completed the periodic training.

Member States have chosen different criteria to establish their national timetables for the periodic training of drivers holding acquired rights. These can be based for instance on the date on which the driving licence was issued, on the driver’s birthday, on the driving licence expiry date, on the age of the driver, or on the driving licence number.

National timetables are included in the Annex.

2.9.        Place of training — Article 9

Drivers who are nationals of an EU Member State must obtain the initial qualification in the Member State where they normally reside, while drivers who are nationals of third countries must obtain the qualification in the Member State where their employer is established or in the Member State where they obtained a work permit.

Drivers must undergo the periodic training in the Member State where they normally reside or where they work.

Regarding the recognition of previous training for drivers who change their country of residence or country of work, the majority of the Member States require a certificate or evidence of the training undertaken[22].

Member States have not reported any difficulty concerning the implementation of this Article. In some isolated cases, however, they do not always recognise previous training partially followed in another Member State and only accept training completed in their territory.

2.10.      Community code — Article 10

The competent authorities enter code 95, which serves as proof of compliance with the training requirements, either in the driving licence or in a separate driver qualification card.

13 Member States have opted to enter the code in the driver qualification card and 12 Member States enter it in the driving licence. In Finland both options are possible, while in Luxembourg the code is marked on the driving licence and also on the card only for non-resident drivers.

Norway enters code 95 in the certificate of professional competence. In future, it will also be entered in the driving licence (Table 5).

Table 5 — Code 95

Member States that enter code 95 in the driving licence || Austria, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia

Member States that enter code 95 in the driver qualification card || Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Hungary, Ireland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom

Finland || Both options are possible

Luxembourg || The code is marked on the driving licence. It is entered in the card only for non-resident drivers.

Norway || Code 95 is entered in the certificate of professional competence. It will also be entered in the driving licence in future

2.11.      Minimum qualification and training requirements — Annex I

As mentioned above (section 3.3), Section 1 of Annex I lists the subjects to be taken into account by Member States when establishing the initial qualification and periodic training for drivers.

Section 2, concerning the compulsory initial qualification under Article 3(1)(a), requires each trainee driver to drive for at least 20 hours individually accompanied by an instructor. For goods drivers wishing to broaden their qualifications in order to carry passengers, or vice versa, since they hold a CPC, they only need to repeat the parts specific to the new qualification and drive for 5 hours. For the accelerated initial qualification, trainees must drive for 10 and 2½, hours respectively.

Under Section 2, (point 2.1) of Annex I, each driver may drive for a maximum of 8 hours of the required 20 hours on special terrain or in a top-of-the-range simulator. For the accelerated initial qualification, trainees may drive for a maximum of 4 of the required 10 hours on special terrain or in a top-of-the-range simulator.

For the majority of Member States, trainees do not need to drive on special terrain or in a simulator. Nonetheless, some provide for this as an option.

In short, Member States have not faced any major problems in applying Annex I. Some issues were reported by Austria and Slovenia regarding the need for practical training or the sufficiency of theoretical lessons. Moreover, it is worth noting that Belgium considers Annex I to be oriented more to drivers involved in international transport than those driving short distances.

3.           Conclusions and recommendations

3.1.        General evaluation of the application of Directive 2003/59/EC

By adopting Directive 2003/59/EC, the legislator has contributed to ensuring a common level of training for professional drivers in the European Union with a view to generally enhancing road safety.

According to the findings of the evaluation, there are several differences among Member States in the application of Directive 2003/59/EC.

First, the Directive allows Member States to choose whether the initial qualification takes the form of a course and test or just involves tests. The periodic training can also vary in structure, since it must be taken as a single course in some Member States while in others the 35 hours can be spread over different years.

Second, training programmes and teaching methods are not standardised: the content of the courses differs between Member States as does the way in which training is provided, e.g. in some Member States the use of computer-based modules is allowed alongside traditional teaching.

Furthermore, the requirements for trainers and the premises where courses are given differ from one Member State to another.

Last, the number of drivers per class, the fleet of vehicles, and the availability of a top-of-the range simulator depend on the testing centre.

Nevertheless, the equivalence of the qualification systems and the efficiency in ensuring the required qualification is guaranteed by the national training systems, which have to meet the requirements in Annex 1 regarding the minimum subjects to be taught and the structure of tests. The monitoring of the training centres by the national authorities also makes an important contribution to ensuring that the training is aligned with the objectives of the Directive.

3.2.        Main aspects to be improved and recommendations

Building upon the findings concerning the application of the Directive, a few specific issues may need to be improved.

As regards the exemptions listed in Article 2 of the Directive, the fact that several Member States apply different exemptions may cause problems for intra-EU cross-border traffic.

Although the Commission has so far no knowledge of any such cases, it is in general advisable for professional drivers and undertakings to be aware of the differences between Member States concerning the application of Article 2 of the Directive.

It may therefore be necessary for the Commission to issue some guidelines, over the medium term, in order to clarify the scope of the exemptions under Article 2.

Regarding the national differences in the timetabling of periodic training, the exchange of national timetables should help overcome any difficulty that enforcement authorities may face when checking drivers from abroad. This can be done within the Committee established under Article 12.

Given that the Directive does not cover this issue, it is essential to maintain close cooperation between Member States, in particular within the Professional Drivers Training Committee.

Against this background, a list of existing national contact points has been established by the Commission in order to facilitate cooperation between Member States.

Finally, it would appear useful in future to closely involve social partners and consult them on a regular basis.

Annex

National timetables for implementation of periodic training for drivers with acquired rights (deadlines for attending the first course)

Austria || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

Belgium || Cat. D: 10.9.2015 Cat. C: 10.9.2016

Bulgaria || Cat. D driving licence issued: before 31 12 1970: 31.12.2009 from 1.1.1971 to 31.12..1980: 31.12.2010 from 1.1.1981 to 31.12.1990: 31.12. 2011 from 1.1.1991 to 31.12.2000: 31.12. 2012 from 1.1.2001 to 10.09.2008: 10.9.2013

Cat. C driving licence issued: before 31.12.1970: 31.12.2010 from 1.1.1971 to 31.12.1980: 31.12.2011 from 1.1.1981 to 31.12.1990: 31.12.2012 from 1.1.1991 to 31.12. 2000: 31.12.2013 from 1.1.2001 to 10.9.2009: 10.9.2014

Cyprus || All: 26.1.2012

Czech Republic || All: 1.8.2011

Denmark || Cat. D: Date of birth                                           Deadlines 1, 2 or 3                                                    30 .6.2009 4, 5 or 6                                                    31 .12. 2009 7, 8 or 9                                                    30.6.2010 10, 11 or 12                                              31.12.2010 13, 14 or 15                                              30.6.2011 16, 17 or 18                                              31.12.2011 19, 20 or 21                                              30.6.2012 22, 23 or 24                                              31.12.2012 25, 26 or 27                                              30.6.2013 28, 29, 30 or 31              31.12.2013 Cat. C: Date of birth                                            Deadlines 1, 2 or 3                                                    30 .6.2010 4, 5 or 6                                                    31.12.2010 7, 8 or 9                                                    30.6.2011 10, 11 or 12                                              31.12.2011 13, 14 or 15                                              30.6.2012 16, 17 or 18                                              31 .12.2012 19, 20 or 21                                              30 .6.2013 22, 23 or 24                                              31.12.2013 25, 26 or 27                                              30 .6.2014 28, 29, 30 or 31                                        31.12.2014

Estonia || All: 1.9.2011

Finland || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

France || Cat. D: 10.9.2011 Cat. C: 10.9.2012

Germany || Cat. D: 10.9.2015 Cat. C: 10 .9.2016

Greece || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

Hungary || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

Ireland || Cat. D: 10.9.2009 Cat. C: 10.9.2010

Italy || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

Latvia || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

Lithuania || Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10.9.2014

Luxembourg || Cat. D: 10.9.2015 Cat. C: 10.9.2016

Malta || Cat. D: 9.9.2013 Cat. C: 9.9.2014

The Netherlands || Cat. D: 10.9.2015 Cat. C: 10.9.2016

Poland || All: 12.9.2014

Portugal || Cat. D: drivers who are currently: 30 years old: by 10.9.2011 between 31 and 40 years old: by 10.9.2012 between 41 and 50 years old: by 10.9.2013 over 50 years old: by 10.9.2015 Cat. C: drivers who are currently: 30 years old: by 10.9.2012 between 31 and 40 years old: by 10.9.2013 between 41 and 50 years old: by 10.9.2014 50 years old: by 10.9.2016.

Romania || The system has been in place since 2003

Slovenia Slovakia || Cat. D: 1.10.2008 Cat. C: 1.10.2009 Cat. D: 10.9.2013 Cat. C: 10 .9.2014

Spain || a) Cat. D driving licence ending with: 1 or 2: 10.9.2011 3 or 4: 10.9.2012 5 or 6: 10.9.2013 7 or 8: 10.9.2014 9 or 0: 10.9.2015 b) Cat. C driving licence ending with: 1 or 2: 10.9.2012 3 or 4: 10.9.2013 5 or 6: 10.9.2014 7 or 8: 10.9.2015 9 or 0: 10.9.2016

Sweden || Cat. D: 10.9.2015 Cat. C: 10.9. 2016

United Kingdom || Cat. D: 9.9.2013 Cat. C: 9.9.2014

Norway || Cat. D driving licence expiring between 10.9.2011 and 10.9.2015:  date of expiry of the driving licence. Cat. D driving licence expiring date: 2008: 2011 2009: 2012 2010: 2013 2011: 10.9.2011 from 11.9. 2015: 2015 2016: 2014 2017: 2015 2018: 2014 Cat. C driving licence which expires between 10.9.2012 and 10.9.2016: date of expiry of the driving licence. Cat. C driving licence expiring date: 2009: 2012 2010: 2013 2011: 2014 before 10.9.2012: 2012 from 11.9.2016: 2016 2017: 2015 2018: 2016

[1]               OJ L 226, 10/09/2003, pp. 4–17, as amended.

[2]               According to the impact assessment, ‘On measures enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of the tachograph system’, SEC 2011(948), DG MOVE.

[3]               Some estimations provided by the national authorities: 510 out of 15 000 in Hungary, 100–200 out of 11 000 in Poland, 190 out of 3 042 in Portugal, 185 out of 9 571 in Romania, 24 out of 9 638 in Slovakia, 23 out of 10 136 in the United Kingdom, none out of 8 606 in Bulgaria, 3 out of 615 in Lithuania.

[4]               Under Article 2, the Directive does not apply to drivers of:         (a) vehicles with a maximum authorised speed not exceeding 45 km/h;      (b) vehicles used by, or under the control of, the armed forces, civil defence, the fire service and forces responsible for maintaining public order;         (c) vehicles undergoing road tests for technical development, repair or maintenance purposes, or new or rebuilt vehicles that have not yet been put into service;            (d) vehicles used in a state of emergency or assigned to rescue missions;               e) vehicles used in the course of driving lessons for any person wishing to obtain a driving licence or a CPC, as provided for in Article 6 and Article 8(1);   (f) vehicles used for the non-commercial carriage of passengers or goods, for personal use;               (g) vehicles carrying material or equipment to be used by the driver in the course of his or her work, provided that driving the vehicle is not the driver’s principal activity.

[5]               This information does not come from the questionnaires returned by the Member States but was communicated to the Commission by some national authorities.

[6]               OJ L 237, 24.8.1991, pp. 1–24.

[7]               Austria, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Romania.

[8]               Norway.

[9]               Finland, Sweden.

[10]             Greece, Italy, Latvia.

[11]             Cyprus, Czech Republic, Luxembourg, Poland.

[12]             Lithuania.

[13]             Slovenia.

[14]             This happens, for instance, in Bulgaria.

[15]             This is the case with Sweden.

[16]             Besides Luxembourg, where the initial training is funded by the public sector, in various Member States the national employment agencies provide some kind of funding for the training.

[17]             This is the case for Malta and Norway.

[18]             Norway requires trainees to achieve a certain degree of progress in the driving licence programme before starting the initial qualification programme.

[19]             Denmark, Norway, France and Latvia, respectively.

[20]             Luxembourg, Romania and France, respectively.

[21]             Agreement was reached at the Committee meeting on 27 May 2009. A note issued by the Commission services was then circulated to all Committee members for information.

[22]             In Luxembourg, the Minister of Transport decides on a case-by-case basis, after taking into account the opinion of the commission responsible at the Ministry of Sustainable Development and Infrastructure. In Malta, the authorities run a check and exchange data with the competent authority of the driver’s Member State.

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