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Document 52017XC0128(07)

Publication of an application pursuant to Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs

OJ C 29, 28.1.2017, p. 32–35 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

28.1.2017   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 29/32


Publication of an application pursuant to Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs

(2017/C 29/17)

This publication confers the right to oppose the application pursuant to Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council (1).

SINGLE DOCUMENT

‘TRADITIONAL WELSH PERRY’

EC No: UK-PGI-0005-01250 – 6.8.2014

PDO ( ) PGI ( X )

1.   Name

‘Traditional Welsh Perry’

2.   Member State or Third Country

United Kingdom

3.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff

3.1.   Type of product

Class 1.8. other products listed in Annex I to the Treaty (spices etc.)

3.2.   Description of product to which the name in (1) applies

‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ (in Welsh ‘Perai Cymreig Traddodiadol’) is the name given to the first pressed juice of perry pears from any indigenous and non-indigenous pear varieties grown in Wales to a Traditional production method. ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ is made from the first pressed juice of either a single variety of perry pear or from a blend of different varieties. ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ is made from 100 % pure perry pear juice only.

The colour of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ ranes from pale yellow to dark gold and is clear or cloudy with a prominent light or full fruity pear flavour balanced with natural sweetness due to the sorbitol content of the perry pears used, and a citrus acidity and delicate fruity aroma. The flavour is complemented by the ‘body’ given by the tannins and can have a crisp dry or predominantly sweet finish. It has an alcoholic strength between 3,00-8,49 % ABV.

Three forms of Traditional Welsh Perry are produced – still, bottle conditioned and bottle fermented as described.

Still: this is perry with no carbonation above atmospheric pressure. Stored in an airtight container the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (CO2) will be less than 1 bar (100kPa), and within a more porous container, such as a wooden barrel, the partial pressure will be substantially less than 1 bar. Perry served either directly or indirectly from these types of container will be still (flat) with no perceivable effervescence but with the possible formation of some bubbles if the temperature of the perry rises from its stored temperature — as the solubility of CO2 decreases as the temperature rises.

Bottle conditioned: a natural carbonation is introduced by bottling the perry prior to the completion of the primary fermentation. The perry is bottled at a specific gravity (SG) decided by the maker to give the desired level of carbonation and sweetness. The more carbonation achieved the less residual sweetness remains. For keeved perry the desired level of carbonation is achieved by reducing the number of yeast cells and denuding the yeast of nutrient which prevents the completion of fermentation to dryness. The CO2 pressure achieved in bottle conditioned perry will be in the range of 1,5 to 3,0 bar (150-300kPa) at 0 °C and as it contains yeast sediment can appear cloudy if not opened and poured carefully. It is dry to the palate unless ‘keeved’. Only bottle conditioned, Traditional Welsh Perry has the option of being ‘keeved’. The maker can calculate the level of carbonation achieved from the difference in specific gravity (Δ SG) prior to bottling and that at completion of the bottle conditioning process.

Although the alcoholic strength of bottle conditioned Traditional Welsh Perry would be within a similar range of still perry (from 3,00 % to a maximum of 8,49 % ABV) on average bottle conditioned perry, particularly if ‘keeved’ would tend to be the lower end of this range (3,0-5,5 % ABV) as keeving results in incomplete fermentation of the fruit sugars.

Bottle fermented: a natural carbonation is introduced by bottling the perry at the completion of the primary fermentation and inducing a second fermentation by the addition of fermentable sugar and yeast. Bottle fermented perry has a higher carbonation than bottle conditioned and is of clear appearance after disgorging. It is dry to the palate as all sugar is fermented during the secondary fermentation and post disgorgement dosing is not permitted. The CO2 pressure achieved in bottle fermented perry will be in the range of 4,0 to 6,0 bar (400-600kPa) at 0 °C The maker can predict the level of carbonation from the amount of fermentable sugar added and can calculate this from the Δ SG from measurements made post addition and that at completion of the bottle fermented process.

Although bottle fermented perry’s alcoholic strength would be within a similar range of still Traditional Welsh Perry (from 3,00 % to a maximum of 8,49 % ABV) on average bottle fermented perry will tend to be at the higher end of this range due to the second fermentation to dryness (5,5- 8,49 % ABV).

3.3.   Feed (for products of animal origin only) and raw materials (for processed products only)

The raw materials for the production of Traditional Welsh Perry are:

First pressed juice of perry pears made from any indigenous and non-indigenous pear varieties grown in Wales.

Permitted additives:

Cultured yeasts such as S.bayanus, S. cerevisiae

Sulphite in the form of sodium or potassium metabisulphite is not always necessary but is permissible to safeguard microbiological standards. Where a maker chooses to add sulphite it should not be more than 200mg/litre and its inclusion must be identified on the label as required by law.

Calcium Chloride salt and Pectin esterase enzyme when using the ‘keeving’ method to reduce its yeast and yeast nutrient content.

3.4.   Specific steps in production that must take place in the identified geographical area

The following production steps in must take place in the geographical area:

Sourcing of the pears

Pressing/juicing of the pears

Production of perry

Fermentation

Bottling and barrelling

3.5.   Specific rules concerning slicing, grating, packaging, etc. of the product the registered name refers to

Still perry

Bottling and barrelling are the final packaging processes applied to still perry.

All bottling and barrelling of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ must take place within the geographical area; the perry is an unpasteurised ‘live’ product and to maintain quality, traceability, temperature control and the avoidance of any contamination, transportation at this stage should be kept to a minimum which precludes widespread bulk transport before final packaging

Sparkling: bottle conditioned and bottle fermented perry

Sparkling perry is produced in bottles. The sparkle is caused by dissolved carbon dioxide that can only be introduced naturally (by means of fermentation of yeast inside the sealed bottle) and not by artificial carbonation.

For bottle conditioned perry: (completion of primary fermentation within the bottle)

Whether keeved or not, the perry is bottled at the required specific gravity to give the required conditioning and sweetness in the bottle.

For bottle fermented perry: (secondary in-bottle fermentation). Bottle fermentation applies to the process of secondary fermentation of still perry within a sealed bottle.

Perry used for these processes is manufactured to the exact same specification as still perry prior to bottling. Bottles must be heavy-duty, punted and capable of being sealed with either a 29 mm crown cap or a natural cork or plastic stopper with a wire cage closure, and able to withstand a sustained internal pressure of 6-12 bar at 25 °C.

3.6.   Specific rules concerning labelling of the product the registered name refers to

4.   Concise definition of the geographical area

The country of Wales

5.   Link with the geographical area

The unique individual characteristics of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ are based upon it being the first pressed juice of indigenous and non indigenous perry pear varieties grown in the designated area. The perry is produced by a traditional method in the designated area from a skill base that has developed throughout Wales as demonstrated by the current geographical spread of members of the Welsh Perry and Cider Society. The individual variety of pear and their combinations used influences the flavour and appearance of the perry. Consequently there are a wide variety of products which adds to the unique individual characteristic of this artisanal drink. The correct level of taste, flavour and appearance being obtained from expert and skilled artisan training.

The soil and the climate of the designated area underpin the reputation of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry.’ The character and flavour of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ has variations depending on the areas of Wales within which the perry pears are grown and where the perry is produced.

By the nature of its soil and climate, lowland areas of Wales are highly suitable for perry pear growing as it allows the selection of orchard sites which avoid frost pockets in early spring during blossom time. The Welsh climate also has plentiful rainfall, essential during both blossom time and during the autumn prior to harvest. The Welsh climate is warm and sunny enough at the right times to produce sufficient levels of fruit sugars, and wet enough to satisfy the high water demands of established perry pear trees and to supply the needs of newly planted trees. The Welsh county providing the majority of pears for ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ is eastern Monmouthshire. The deep alluvial red sandstone soils have excellent moisture retaining properties whilst maintaining excellent drainage properties during times of above average rainfall. This combination is reputed to give a higher quality fruit which is translated into the perry. There are perry pear trees in Monmouthshire that are anything up to 300 years old.

‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ is made by fermenting the juice of pears grown in Wales from indigenous and non-indigenous varieties. The character of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ can also have subtle nuances depending upon where the perry is fermented. At lower temperatures which may be dependent on latitude, microclimate and altitude, fermentation is slower as there is much greater retention of naturally occurring volatile aromatic compounds which is considered to enhance the flavour and aroma of the perry resulting in a prominent light or full fruity pear flavour with a clean crisp taste. The variety or varieties of perry pear used can influence the flavour and appearance of the perry. The colour of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ will vary from pale almost colourless yellow to dark gold.

‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ can range from extremely dry to very sweet. The addition of fermentable sugars such as glucose, fructose and sucrose is only allowed in the production of bottle fermented perry to start the secondary fermentation process. With all other ‘Traditional Welsh Perrys’ no extra sugar is added as there are sufficient natural fruit sugars in the Welsh perry pears themselves.

The juice for ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ consists of 100 % first pressed pear juice from either a blend or a single variety, whereas in other parts of the UK a second pressing may occur. In addition in other parts of the UK the juice may be chapitalized (sugar added) leading to subsequent fermentation to a higher alcohol content, and then subsequently diluted with water which results in a more homogenous product. In comparison no two batches of ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ are ever exactly the same which adds to the unique individual characteristic of this artisanal product.

‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ is produced from a skill base throughout Wales and this is demonstrated by the current geographical spread of members of the Welsh Perry and Cider Society. Specific traditional making skills are required to make ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’. This knowledge and expertise is passed down from one ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ maker to the next. Timing of collection of the fruit, milling and processing can be crucial as some pear varieties soften and autolyse rapidly on ripening and storing of the fruit can be problematic. The biggest influence of these timings is the fruit variety. The perry maker must have an intimate knowledge of the fruit varieties being used and the detailed chronology of the harvest. Single varieties of perry are produced or perry may be produced from a blend of different varieties. The blending of different varieties prior to and after fermentation requires specific skills. In addition specific skills are needed to ascertain whether high tannin perries require prolonged storage of fermented juice to allow precipitation, or alternatively if the fruit needs to be subjected to oxidation through maceration (allowing the milled pulp to stand prior to pressing) if suitable equipment is available. The Welsh Perry and Cider Society encourage the dissemination of knowledge expertise and savoir faire within its membership.

Historically ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ making dates back to it being a farm based activity but perry was a more refined drink largely reserved for the gentleman farmer and his family as opposed to being a drink for the agricultural workmen. Farm production of perry making declined in the 19th Century when farm production of cider declined and cider factories evolved. Perry making did not lend itself to factory methods of production as many of the factory methods such as floating of the fruit within water channels could not be used for pears as pears sink in water and are required to be handled differently. As a result the perry making tradition largely died out but many of the perry trees survived. A slow revival advanced in 2001 when the Welsh Perry and Cider Society was formed and now there is a resurgence of interest in making ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ throughout Wales with approximately 20 perry makers in Wales. In parts of Wales where the climate and geographical factors are not suited to growing perry pears, producers purchase the fruit from Welsh growers in the more favourable perry pear growing areas of Wales. The society now organises an annual Welsh Perry championship.

‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ is becoming well established and widely recognised by the food industry both in the UK and worldwide. As a quality product it is used by many top chefs and gastronomes and it regularly appears as a named ingredient on their menus. In 2008 ‘Traditional Welsh Perry’ won the True Taste of Wales ‘Alcoholic Drink Product’ category and in 2012 won the Bath and West Show ‘Laurence Riley Cup’ for the best perry in the show.

Reference to publication of the specification

(the second subparagraph of Article 6(1) of this Regulation)

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protected-food-name-welsh-perry-pdo


(1)  OJ L 343, 14.12.2012, p. 1.


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