ISSN 1977-091X

Official Journal

of the European Union

C 61

European flag  

English edition

Information and Notices

Volume 64
22 February 2021


Contents

page

 

II   Information

 

INFORMATION FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

 

European Commission

2021/C 61/01

Non-opposition to a notified concentration (Case M.10130 — APG/Arcus/PSP/Alpha Trains) ( 1 )

1

2021/C 61/02

Non-opposition to a notified concentration (Case M.9676 — Lov Group/Banijay/ESG) ( 1 )

2

2021/C 61/03

Non-opposition to a notified concentration (Case M.10136 — PGGM/Arcus/AMP/Alpha Trains) ( 1 )

3

2021/C 61/04

Non-opposition to a notified concentration (Case M.9779 — Alstom/Bombardier Transportation) ( 1 )

4


 

IV   Notices

 

NOTICES FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

 

European Commission

2021/C 61/05

Euro exchange rates — 19 February 2021

5


 

V   Announcements

 

PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPETITION POLICY

 

European Commission

2021/C 61/06

Prior notification of a concentration (Case M.10190 — OTPP/KKR/Caruna Group) – Candidate case for simplified procedure ( 1 )

6

 

OTHER ACTS

 

European Commission

2021/C 61/07

Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

8

2021/C 61/08

Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

18

2021/C 61/09

Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

23

2021/C 61/10

Publication of an application for registration of a name pursuant to Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs

27


 


 

(1)   Text with EEA relevance.

EN

 


II Information

INFORMATION FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

European Commission

22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/1


Non-opposition to a notified concentration

(Case M.10130 — APG/Arcus/PSP/Alpha Trains)

(Text with EEA relevance)

(2021/C 61/01)

On 15 February 2021, the Commission decided not to oppose the above notified concentration and to declare it compatible with the internal market. This decision is based on Article 6(1)(b) of Council Regulation (EC) No 139/2004 (1). The full text of the decision is available only in English and will be made public after it is cleared of any business secrets it may contain. It will be available:

in the merger section of the Competition website of the Commission (http://ec.europa.eu/competition/mergers/cases/). This website provides various facilities to help locate individual merger decisions, including company, case number, date and sectoral indexes,

in electronic form on the EUR-Lex website (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/homepage.html?locale=en) under document number 32021M10130. EUR-Lex is the online access to European law.


(1)  OJ L 24, 29.1.2004, p. 1.


22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/2


Non-opposition to a notified concentration

(Case M.9676 — Lov Group/Banijay/ESG)

(Text with EEA relevance)

(2021/C 61/02)

On 30 June 2020, the Commission decided not to oppose the above notified concentration and to declare it compatible with the internal market. This decision is based on Article 6(1)(b) of Council Regulation (EC) No 139/2004 (1). The full text of the decision is available only in English and will be made public after it is cleared of any business secrets it may contain. It will be available:

in the merger section of the Competition website of the Commission (http://ec.europa.eu/competition/mergers/cases/). This website provides various facilities to help locate individual merger decisions, including company, case number, date and sectoral indexes,

in electronic form on the EUR-Lex website (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/homepage.html?locale=en) under document number 32020M9676. EUR-Lex is the online access to European law.


(1)  OJ L 24, 29.1.2004, p. 1.


22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/3


Non-opposition to a notified concentration

(Case M.10136 — PGGM/Arcus/AMP/Alpha Trains)

(Text with EEA relevance)

(2021/C 61/03)

On 17 February 2021, the Commission decided not to oppose the above notified concentration and to declare it compatible with the internal market. This decision is based on Article 6(1)(b) of Council Regulation (EC) No 139/2004 (1). The full text of the decision is available only in English and will be made public after it is cleared of any business secrets it may contain. It will be available:

in the merger section of the Competition website of the Commission (http://ec.europa.eu/competition/mergers/cases/). This website provides various facilities to help locate individual merger decisions, including company, case number, date and sectoral indexes,

in electronic form on the EUR-Lex website (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/homepage.html?locale=en) under document number 32021M10136. EUR-Lex is the online access to European law.


(1)  OJ L 24, 29.1.2004, p. 1.


22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/4


Non-opposition to a notified concentration

(Case M.9779 — Alstom/Bombardier Transportation)

(Text with EEA relevance)

(2021/C 61/04)

On 31 July 2020, the Commission decided not to oppose the above notified concentration and to declare it compatible with the internal market. This decision is based on Article 6(1)(b) in conjunction with Article 6(2) of Council Regulation (EC) No. 139/2004 (1). The full text of the decision is available only in English and will be made public after it is cleared of any business secrets it may contain. It will be available:

in the merger section of the Competition website of the Commission (http://ec.europa.eu/competition/mergers/cases/). This website provides various facilities to help locate individual merger decisions, including company, case number, date and sectoral indexes,

in electronic form on the EUR-Lex website (http://eur-lex.europa.eu/homepage.html?locale=en) under document number 32020M9779. EUR-Lex is the online access to European law.


(1)  OJ L 24, 29.1.2004, p. 1.


IV Notices

NOTICES FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

European Commission

22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/5


Euro exchange rates (1)

19 February 2021

(2021/C 61/05)

1 euro =


 

Currency

Exchange rate

USD

US dollar

1,2139

JPY

Japanese yen

127,81

DKK

Danish krone

7,4368

GBP

Pound sterling

0,86508

SEK

Swedish krona

10,0330

CHF

Swiss franc

1,0851

ISK

Iceland króna

155,60

NOK

Norwegian krone

10,2095

BGN

Bulgarian lev

1,9558

CZK

Czech koruna

25,849

HUF

Hungarian forint

358,50

PLN

Polish zloty

4,4830

RON

Romanian leu

4,8758

TRY

Turkish lira

8,4470

AUD

Australian dollar

1,5445

CAD

Canadian dollar

1,5307

HKD

Hong Kong dollar

9,4121

NZD

New Zealand dollar

1,6642

SGD

Singapore dollar

1,6059

KRW

South Korean won

1 339,59

ZAR

South African rand

17,7391

CNY

Chinese yuan renminbi

7,8318

HRK

Croatian kuna

7,5780

IDR

Indonesian rupiah

17 094,81

MYR

Malaysian ringgit

4,9048

PHP

Philippine peso

58,846

RUB

Russian rouble

89,6089

THB

Thai baht

36,386

BRL

Brazilian real

6,5633

MXN

Mexican peso

24,7094

INR

Indian rupee

88,0145


(1)  Source: reference exchange rate published by the ECB.


V Announcements

PROCEDURES RELATING TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPETITION POLICY

European Commission

22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/6


Prior notification of a concentration

(Case M.10190 — OTPP/KKR/Caruna Group)

Candidate case for simplified procedure

(Text with EEA relevance)

(2021/C 61/06)

1.   

On 15 Febuary 2021, the Commission received notification of a proposed concentration pursuant to Article 4 of Council Regulation (EC) No 139/2004 (1).

This notification concerns the following undertakings:

Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan Board (‘OTPP’, Canada),

KKR & Co. Inc. (‘KKR’, USA),

Caruna Group (Finland).

OTPP and KKR acquire within the meaning of Article 3(1)(b) of the Merger Regulation joint control of the whole of Caruna Group.

The concentration is accomplished by way of purchase of shares.

2.   

The business activities of the undertakings concerned are:

for OTPP: the administration of pension benefits and the investment of pension plan assets of teachers in the Canadian province of Ontario,

for KKR: a global investment firm that manages multiple alternative asset classes including private equity, energy, infrastructure, real estate and credit,

for Caruna Group: it operates an electricity distribution network for approximately 700,000 customers in South, Southwest and West Finland, as well as in the city of Joensuu, the sub-region of Koillismaa and Satakunta.

3.   

On preliminary examination, the Commission finds that the notified transaction could fall within the scope of the Merger Regulation. However, the final decision on this point is reserved.

Pursuant to the Commission Notice on a simplified procedure for treatment of certain concentrations under the Council Regulation (EC) No 139/2004 (2) it should be noted that this case is a candidate for treatment under the procedure set out in the Notice.

4.   

The Commission invites interested third parties to submit their possible observations on the proposed operation to the Commission.

Observations must reach the Commission not later than 10 days following the date of this publication. The following reference should always be specified:

M.10190 — OTPP/KKR/Caruna Group

Observations can be sent to the Commission by email, by fax, or by post. Please use the contact details below:

Email: COMP-MERGER-REGISTRY@ec.europa.eu

Fax +32 22964301

Postal address:

European Commission

Directorate-General for Competition

Merger Registry

1049 Bruxelles/Brussel

BELGIQUE/BELGIË


(1)  OJ L 24, 29.1.2004, p. 1 (the ‘Merger Regulation’).

(2)  OJ C 366, 14.12.2013, p. 5.


OTHER ACTS

European Commission

22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/8


Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

(2021/C 61/07)

This communication is published in accordance with Article 17(5) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33 (1).

COMMUNICATING THE APPROVAL OF A STANDARD AMENDMENT

‘ASTI’

PDO-IT-A1396-AM05

Date of communication: 4.12.2020

DESCRIPTION OF AND REASONS FOR THE APPROVED AMENDMENT

1.   Grape varieties

Whereas Moscato was previously the only grape variety permitted, other aromatic white grapes suitable for growing in the Piedmont region may now account for up to 3 %. This is not a change of any great importance: the PDO wines are in fact made with Moscato Bianco alone and this amendment has been requested so that vineyards are not found to be non-compliant as a result of the fortuitous presence other grape varieties within the Moscato Bianco production area, as well as when dead or blighted vines are replaced, particularly in older vineyards. This may also occur for reasons linked to the greater prevalence of Esca and Flavescence dorée, or in some cases may be caused by the long-standing rural tradition of growing other white varieties in the vineyards to produce grapes and wine for the family’s own consumption.

This amendment affects Article 2 of the product specification.

2.   Wine-making rules

The minimum natural alcoholic strength by volume for ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico (denoting that it has been made using the ‘traditional method’ of sparkling winemaking) is now 10 % rather than 11 %.

Following extensive tests, it has been decided that this requirement for sparkling wines in the Metodo Classico category should be relaxed to facilitate the production of drier types such as pas dosé, extra brut and brut. This is also linked to the amendments below concerning the increased grape yield and extraction rate for sparkling wines in the Metodo Classico category, thus harmonising the criteria applicable to all sparkling wines covered by the PDO, regardless of the method used (traditional or Charmat). These amendments also make it easier for growers to declare the produce of a single vineyard under the different categories.

The amendment to the natural alcoholic strength of the grapes affects Article 4 of the product specification but has no impact on the single document.

3.   Maximum yields

For the ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico category, the maximum permitted yield has been changed from 8 to 10 tonnes of grapes per hectare (9,5 for the sub-regions), and the wine extraction rate is now capped at 75 % rather than 60 %. These increases reflect the actual capacity of the vineyards in existence today and the yields that can be obtained according to experiments carried out, which have shown that increasing the yield to 10 tonnes per hectare does not affect the quality or characteristics of the product. There are also technical reasons for requesting this amendment: when the yield of grapes from a vineyard is lower, ripening occurs significantly earlier, causing a sudden drop in acidity, which results in grapes that are often unsuitable for making the drier types of sparkling wine using the traditional method.

This amendment affects point 5(b) of the single document (Maximum yields) and is linked to Articles 4 and 5 of the ‘Asti’ product specification and the same articles in the additional specifications for the Santa Vittoria d’Alba and Strevi sub-regions.

4.   Description of the wine(s)

(a)

The permitted range of sugar content in the sparkling wines (‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ and ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico) has been extended to cover the pas dosé, brut and extra brut types.

(b)

In connection with the introduction of drier sparkling wines, the actual alcoholic strength by volume required for ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico has been changed from ‘6 % to 8 %’ to ‘not less than 6 %’.

(c)

The additional product specifications for the Santa Vittoria d’Alba and Strevi sub-regions now also include Metodo Classico sparkling wines.

These amendments relate to the organoleptic characteristics described in Article 6 of the ‘Asti’ product specification, Article 6 of the additional specification for the Santa Vittoria d’Alba sub-area, Article 5 of the additional specification for the Strevi sub-area and point 4 of the single document (Description of the wine(s)).

5.   Grape-growing area

The reference to the municipality of Camo in the province of Cuneo has been deleted because it has been merged with the municipality of Santo Stefano Belbo, already listed as part of the grape-growing area. For greater clarity, the precise description of the demarcated geographical area already provided in the product specification has now also been included in the single document.

This is an editorial change which does not affect the demarcated geographical area.

This amendment concerns Article 3 of the product specification and point 6 of the single document (Demarcated geographical area).

6.   Wine-making rules

Article 5(11) of the product specification has been deleted. It read as follows: ‘The DOCG wines referred to in Article 1 may not be made using artificial carbonation (whether full or partial), and fermentation inhibitors cannot be used for preservation purposes, even if such practices are generally permitted under existing EU and national law.’

The deleted sub-article contained a ban already present in the legislation – which was therefore superfluous – and a restriction on practices that are in fact lawful; by removing it, winemakers are now required to refer to current EU and national legislation.

Article 5(14) (formerly 5(15)) of the product specification, on the product categories that can be made using the batches of must (understood as the intermediate product of winemaking) declared suitable for making the PDO wines, has been reworded, giving winemakers the freedom to decide which product categories to make from a batch of must in the interests of optimum production management. Therefore, a batch of must recorded in the annual grape production declaration as being suitable for making ‘Moscato d’Asti’ or ‘Moscato d’Asti’Vendemmia Tardiva may be used not only to make ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ but also to make ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico, which was not previously allowed. Moreover, a batch of must intended for ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ or ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico may be used for ‘Moscato d’Asti’ provided that it has the minimum natural alcoholic strength required for the latter.

This amendment concerns Article 5 of the product specification and has no impact on the single document.

7.   Naming and labelling wines

While there is a tradition of producing quality aromatic sparkling wines (category 6) – both by the traditional method and otherwise – in the municipalities making up the Santa Vittoria d’Alba and Strevi sub-regions, until now these wines have been marketed as ‘Asti’ PDO. This amendment therefore gives the possibility of labelling these wines with the sub-region in question. This also means that consumers are provided with more precise information on a wine’s origin.

Moreover, the requirements applicable to these wine types under the rules for the sub-regions are more stringent than the criteria for the basic PDO wines. For example, maximum yield is lower (by 1-1,5 tonnes of grapes per hectare) and the grapes are required to have a higher minimum natural alcoholic strength by volume (by 1-1,5 %).

This amendment affects Articles 1 to 7 of the additional product specifications for the Santa Vittoria d’Alba and Strevi sub-regions and is linked to points 4 (Description of the wine(s)) and 5 (Maximum yields) of the single document.

8.   Derogation from the requirements that production and bottling take place in the demarcated area

Point 9 of the single document (Essential further conditions) now provides exceptions to the requirement that production and bottling take place in the demarcated geographical area.

These rules have been in the product specification since ‘Asti’ was first recognised as a PDO (in 1967) and were confirmed when the name gained DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita or ‘Controlled and Guaranteed Designation of Origin’) status in Italy and the sub-regions were introduced. However, due to an error they were omitted from the single document in 2011, when the files relating to all the pre-existing designations were added to the European Commission’s information system.

This is an editorial change, as the actual rules in the product specification remain unchanged.

This amendment affects point 9 of the single document (Essential further conditions) and has no impact on the product specification.

9.   Editorial revisions

Some contact details have been updated. This amendment concerns the Contact details section under Other information in point 1.2 of the single document.

Following the deletion of Article 5(11), the remaining sub-articles within Article 5 have been renumbered.

Article 7(3) of the product specification has been deleted because it is incompatible with the fact that sparkling wines can now be labelled with the name of a sub-region and because the other aspects it mentioned are laid down in current legislation and were therefore superfluous.

The references to legislation in the product specification have been updated.

SINGLE DOCUMENT

1.   Name of the product

‘Asti’

2.   Geographical indication type

PDO – Protected Designation of Origin

3.   Categories of grapevine product

1.

Wine

6.

Quality aromatic sparkling wine

4.   Description of the wine(s)

‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ and the sub-region-specific types ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ Santa Vittoria d’Alba and ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ Strevi

Foam: fine, long-lasting

Colour: from straw-yellow to pale gold

Smell: characteristic, delicate

Taste: characteristic, balanced, from pas dosé to sweet.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 11,5 %, including an actual alcoholic strength of at least 6 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 15 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

6

Minimum total acidity:

4,5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ Metodo Classico (traditional method) and the sub-region-specific types ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ Metodo Classico Santa Vittoria d’Alba and ‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ Metodo Classico Strevi

Foam: fine, long-lasting

Colour: from straw-yellow to very pale gold

Smell: characteristic, pronounced, delicate

Taste: characteristic, balanced, from pas dosé to sweet.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %, including an actual alcoholic strength of at least 6 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 17 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

6

Minimum total acidity:

6 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

‘Moscato d’Asti’ Vendemmia Tardiva (late harvest)

Colour: golden yellow

Smell: fruity, very intense, characteristic of the raisined grape with spiced notes

Taste: sweet, harmonious, velvety, with notes of the Moscato variety, which is reminiscent of honeycomb.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 14 %, including an actual alcoholic strength of at least 11 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 22 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

4,5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

‘Moscato d’Asti’

Colour: straw-yellow of varying intensity

Smell: characteristic fragrant aroma of Moscato

Taste: sweet, aromatic, characteristic, may be lightly sparkling.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 11 %, including an actual alcoholic strength by volume of between 4,5 % and 6,5 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 15 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

4,5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Sub-region-specific type ‘Moscado d’Asti’ Santa Vittoria d’Alba

Colour: straw-yellow with hints of gold

Flavour: elegant, fine, fresh and persistent, also with floral notes

Taste: straightforward, harmonious, sweet, aromatic, characteristic of Moscatello grapes, possibly lightly sparkling.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %, including an actual alcoholic strength by volume of between 4,5 % and 6,5 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 15 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Sub-region-specific type ‘Moscato d’Asti’ Canelli

Smell: musky, characteristic fragrant aroma of Moscato

Colour: from varying intensities of straw-yellow to golden

Taste: sweet, aromatic, characteristic, with an aroma of Moscato grapes, possibly lightly sparkling.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %, including an actual alcoholic strength by volume of between 4,5% and 6,5 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 16 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

4,5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Sub-region-specific type ‘Moscato d’Asti’ Strevi

Colour: from varying intensities of straw-yellow to golden

Smell: characteristic and fragrant aroma of Moscato

Taste: sweet, aromatic, characteristic, with an aroma of Moscato grapes, possibly lightly sparkling.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %, including an actual alcoholic strength by volume of between 4,5 % and 6,5 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 15 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

4.5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Sub-region-specific type ‘Moscato d’Asti’ Vendemmia Tardiva ‘Santa Vittoria d’Alba’

Colour: bright golden yellow

Flavour: composite, fruity, very intense, characteristic of raisined grapes, with spiced notes Taste: sweet, harmonious and velvety, with notes of the Moscato variety, which is also reminiscent of honeycomb.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 15 %, including an actual alcoholic strength of at least 12 %;

Minimum sugar-free extract: 22 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

4.5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

5.   Wine-making practices

a.   Specific oenological practices

NONE

b.   Maximum yields

‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’ and ‘Moscato d’Asti’

10 000 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Asti’ / ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico

10 000 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Moscato d’Asti’Vendemmia Tardiva

6 000 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Moscato d’Asti’ Canelli and ‘Moscato d’Asti’ Strevi

9 500 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Moscato d’Asti’ Canelli labelled with the term Vigna followed by a place or vineyard name

8 500 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Moscato d’Asti’ Strevi and ‘Moscato d’Asti’ Santa Vittoria d’Alba

9 500 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Moscato d’Asti’Vendemmia Tardiva Santa Vittoria d’Alba

5 000 kilograms of grapes per hectare

‘Asti Spumante’ Santa Vittoria d’Alba, ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico Santa Vittoria d’Alba, ‘Asti Spumante’ Strevi and ‘Asti Spumante’Metodo Classico Strevi

9 500 kilograms of grapes per hectare

6.   Demarcated geographical area

‘Asti’ DOCG wines can be made with grapes grown in the area demarcated as follows:

In the province of Alessandria, the following municipalities in their entirety:

Acqui Terme, Alice Bel Colle, Bistagno, Cassine, Grognardo, Ricaldone, Strevi, Terzo and Visone.

In the province of Asti, the following municipalities in their entirety: Bubbio, Calamandrana, Calosso, Canelli, Cassinasco, Castagnole Lanze, Castel Boglione, Castelletto Molina, Castelnuovo Belbo, Castel Rocchero, Cessole, Coazzolo, Costigliole d’Asti, Fontanile, Incisa Scapaccino, Loazzolo, Maranzana, Mombaruzzo, Monastero Bormida, Montabone, Nizza Monferrato, Quaranti, San Marzano Oliveto, Moasca, Sessame, Vesime, Rocchetta Palafea and San Giorgio Scarampi.

In the province of Cuneo, the municipalities of Castiglione Tinella, Cossano Belbo, Mango, Neive, Neviglie, Rocchetta Belbo, Serralunga d’Alba, S. Stefano Belbo, S. Vittoria d’Alba, Treiso, Trezzo Tinella, Castino and Perletto in their entirety and the following subdivisions of the municipality of Alba: Como and San Rocco Senodelvio.

The Canelli sub-region is formed by the following municipalities in the province of Asti: Calamandrana, Calosso, Canelli, Cassinasco, Castagnole Lanze, Coazzolo, Costigliole d’Asti, San Marzano Oliveto and Moasca in their entirety, plus the territory of the municipalities of Loazzolo and Bubbio located on the left bank of the river Bormida;

and the following municipalities in the province of Cuneo: Castiglione Tinella, Cossano Belbo, Mango, Neive, Neviglie, Rocchetta Belbo, Serralunga d’Alba, S. Stefano Belbo, Treiso and Trezzo Tinella in their entirety and the following subdivisions of the municipality of Alba: Como and San Rocco Senodelvio.

The Santa Vittoria d’Alba sub-region consists of the municipality of Santa Vittoria d’Alba in the province of Cuneo.

The Strevi sub-region consists of the following municipalities in the province of Alessandria in their entirety: Acqui Terme, Cassine, Ricaldone, Strevi, Terzo, Alice Bel Colle, Bistagno, Grognardo and Visone.

7.   Main wine grape variety(ies)

Moscato bianco B. – Moscato reale

8.   Description of the link(s)

‘ASTI’ DOCG

‘Asti’ and ‘Moscato d’Asti’ are single-variety wines produced exclusively from Moscato Bianco grapes, which have a distinctive, outstanding aromatic profile. The distinctive qualities that this variety lends the various types of wines, including the sparkling and late-harvest versions, are closely linked to the expert cultivation of the vines by growers and to sometimes innovative winemaking techniques, including the development over recent decades of a range of drier Moscato-based wines in both sparkling and still form.

The suitability for winegrowing of the land, with its particular morphology and chemical composition, and the area’s climate conditions and local winemaking skills and traditions, have made it possible, over the years, to ‘select’ Moscato Bianco as the vine variety best suited to the environment.

In the 18th century, a series of articles published in Lausanne on wine and vineyards around the world specifically referred to a Moscato Bianco of Piedmont, highly rated, and at the end of the century the prestigious Società di Agricoltura di Torino declared Moscato as one of the Piedmont grape varieties most likely to produce highly prized wines. In the 19th century Piedmont was clearly distinguishing itself from the other Italian regions for its widespread cultivation of Moscato Bianco. At the end of the nineteenth century, significant amounts of sparkling wine began to be produced from Moscato grapes, re-fermenting the base wine in the bottle. By 1895, the Charmat method (which was invented in Piedmont) had been honed and the Moscato grape was mainly being used to produce sparkling wine. There was already talk of considerable demand, even from abroad, for the fragrant, sparkling white wine known in the trade as ‘Moscato d’Asti’ or ‘Moscato di Canelli’. By opting for sparkling winemaking, Piedmont clearly set itself apart from the other regions where Moscato was also present (though to a far lesser extent). Most of the Moscato wines produced elsewhere were classed as luxury ‘liqueur’ wines, and Moscato was being used for sparkling wine only in Piedmont, namely in the Asti, Alessandria and Cuneo areas. The same period saw the first experiments with dry sparkling Moscato-based wines (‘Asti Champagne’ in the early 1900s). However, these did not have much commercial success, since limited oenological knowledge meant that it was not possible to mitigate the bitter taste caused by the terpenes of a Moscato wine taken to full fermentation. The addition of sugar for re-fermentation in the bottle, which reduced the bitterness, created too much pressure for the bottles used at the time. The producers of ‘Asti’ DOCG have continued to work on developing dry versions of their various wines (both sparkling and still or lightly sparkling). In the 1980s Piedmontese research institutes began to publish papers on the chemical and aromatic characteristics of dry wines made from Moscato Bianco grapes and on the development of the terpene compounds in Moscato grapes in order to optimise production technology. Those years saw the development of the concept of ‘varietal oenology’, i.e. an increasingly fine-tuned technological approach that sought to enhance the characteristics of the grapes in the final quality of the wine. In the specific case of Moscato, technical developments have allowed fermentation to be prolonged, thus reducing the bitter notes that thwarted the producers’ attempts in the early twentieth century. This progress in know-how was passed on to the winemakers who, over recent decades, have developed Moscato-based wines with less sugar, in both sparkling and still form.

9.   Essential further conditions (packaging, labelling, other requirements)

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Legal framework:

In national legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

On the labels and in the presentation of ‘Asti’ or ‘Asti Spumante’ DOCG wines, the sugar content may not be displayed on the same line as the name and must be shown in a different typeface and in smaller characters than those used to display the name.

Derogation on the production in the demarcated geographical area

Legal framework:

In national legislation

Type of further condition:

Derogation on the production in the demarcated geographical area

Description of the condition:

As well as in the grape-growing area, the winemaking operations involved in making ‘Asti’ DOCG wines (including drying grapes for the Vendemmia Tardiva category and the sparkling winemaking process) may also take place anywhere in the provinces of Alessandria, Asti and Cuneo and in Pressione, a sub-division of the municipality of Chieri (Turin) bordering the grape-growing area.

Packaging within the demarcated area

Legal framework:

In national legislation

Type of further condition:

Packaging within the demarcated geographical area

Description of the condition:

‘Asti’ DOCG wines must be bottled within the grape-growing area. In accordance with Article 4 of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33, bottling must take place in the demarcated geographical area specified above to safeguard quality and reputation, guarantee the origin and ensure the effectiveness of checks.

Link to the product specification

https://www.politicheagricole.it/flex/cm/pages/ServeBLOB.php/L/IT/IDPagina/16195


(1)  OJ L 9, 11.1.2019, p. 2.


22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/18


Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

(2021/C 61/08)

This communication is published in accordance with Article 17(5) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33 (1).

COMMUNICATING THE APPROVAL OF A STANDARD AMENDMENT

‘GRECO DI TUFO’

PDO-IT-A0236-AM02

Date of communication: 13 November 2020

DESCRIPTION OF AND REASONS FOR THE APPROVED AMENDMENT

1.   Revision of the list of types – Inclusion of ‘riserva’ types

The types ‘Greco di Tufo Riserva’ and ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante Riserva’ have been included, and the list of permitted wine types has therefore been updated accordingly.

This amendment results from the need to promote PDO ‘Greco di Tufo’, stressing the keeping qualities and taking into account the local custom of placing the wine on the market after it has actually been aged for several years.

In addition, in compliance with the legislation in force, the adjective ‘bianco’ [white] after the name ‘Greco di Tufo’ has been removed.

This amendment affects Articles 1 and 6 of the specification and section 4 of the single document.

2.   Inclusion of an option for emergency irrigation

Taking into account the current changes in climate, and the ever increasing water and heat stress on the plants, this option has been permitted in order to ensure normal growth.

This amendment affects Article 4 of the product specification but does not affect the single document.

3.   Inclusion of the ‘Riserva’ types and their respective ageing periods

In order to distinguish the types ‘Greco di Tufo’ and ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante’ with the indication ‘Riserva’, it is considered appropriate to specify the minimum ageing times and the date on which they begin.

This amendment affects Article 5 of the specification and section 5.a of the single document.

4.   Description of PDO ‘Greco di Tufo’ wines, including ‘Riserva’ types – Update of the analytical and organoleptic qualities

The adjective ‘bianco’ has been removed after the designation ‘Greco di Tufo’.

This is an amendment to the wording in line with the product name.

With the introduction of the types ‘Greco di Tufo Riserva’ and ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante Riserva’, the finished wines’ chemical, physical and organoleptic characteristics are now stated. The information and descriptions refer to a high quality product with medium to long ageing in the winery.

In the description of the taste of ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante’, the maximum residual sugar content has been extended from ‘brut’ to ‘extradry’ [sic].

The amendment is considered necessary in response to the growing consumer demand for such products.

This amendment affects Article 6 of the specification and section 4 of the single document.

5.   Link with the geographical area – Formal amendment to the specification

The wording has been amended and made consistent in the specification and the single document.

This is a formal amendment which does not invalidate the link referred to in Article 93(1)(a)(i) of Regulation (EC) No 1308/2013.

This amendment affects Article 9 of the specification and section 8 of the single document.

SINGLE DOCUMENT

1.   Name of the product

Greco di Tufo

2.   Geographical indication type:

PDO – Protected Designation of Origin

3.   Categories of grapevine product

1.

Wine

4.

Sparkling wine

4.   Description of the wine(s)

Greco di Tufo

Colour: straw yellow of varying intensity.

Aroma: pleasant, intense, elegant, distinctive.

Taste: fresh, dry, harmonious.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 11,5 %.

Minimum sugar-free extract: 16 grams per litre.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Greco di Tufo Riserva

Colour: straw yellow of varying intensity.

Aroma: pleasant, intense, elegant, distinctive.

Taste: dry, fresh, harmonious.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %.

Minimum sugar-free extract: 17 grams per litre.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Greco di Tufo Spumante

Foam: fine and long-lasting.

Colour: straw yellow of varying intensity with pale green or golden highlights.

Aroma: distinctive, pleasant, with a delicate hint of yeast.

Taste: flavoursome, elegant and harmonious, ranging from ‘extrabrut’ to ‘extradry’ [sic].

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %.

Minimum sugar-free extract: 15 grams per litre.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

6 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

Greco di Tufo Spumante Riserva

Foam: fine and long-lasting.

Colour: straw yellow of varying intensity.

Aroma: distinctive, pleasant, with a delicate hint of yeast.

Taste: flavoursome, elegant and harmonious, ranging from ‘extrabrut’ to ‘extradry’ [sic].

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %.

Minimum sugar-free extract: 16 grams per litre.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

6 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

5.   Wine-making practices

a.   Specific oenological practices

‘Greco di Tufo Riserva’ – Minimum ageing period

Specific oenological practice

For the ‘Greco di Tufo Riserva’ type, the minimum ageing period must not be less than 12 months starting from 1 November of the year of harvest.

‘Greco di Tufo Spumante’ including ‘Riserva’ – Production

Specific oenological practice

‘Greco di Tufo Spumante’ wines, including those with the indication ‘Riserva’, must be produced exclusively by the classic method of second fermentation in the bottle.

Production of the ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante’ type must involve a period of lees ageing in the bottle of at least 18 months from the date of tirage [activation of the second fermentation]. In the case of ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante Riserva’, the period of lees ageing in the bottle must not be less than 36 months from the date of tirage.

b.   Maximum yields

‘Greco di Tufo’ – All types

10 000 kg of grapes per hectare

6.   Demarcated geographical area

The production area of the grapes for the production of ‘Greco di Tufo’ DOCG wines covers the entire administrative area of the following municipalities in the Province of Avellino: Tufo, Altavilla Irpina, Chianche, Montefusco, Prata di Principato Ultra, Petruro Irpino, Santa Paolina and Torrioni.

7.   Main wine grape variety(ies)

Greco (B)

8.   Description of the link(s)

‘Greco di Tufo’ PDO – Still and sparkling wine

Natural factors

PDO ‘Greco di Tufo’ is produced in a hilly area through which the river Sabato flows. The terrain is characterised by steep slopes with clay and limestone soils of volcanic origin and mineral-rich subsoil.

The hilly topography of the production area and the predominantly south-east/south-west exposure of the vineyards, situated in areas that are exceptionally well-suited to vine cultivation, combine to create an environment that provides the plant with ideal growing conditions in terms of sufficient ventilation and light.

The hilly parts of the production area are characterised by microclimates with significant differences in temperature between day and night. These contribute to preserving the natural acidity of the grapes during ripening.

Historical and human factors

Vine cultivation in the area has its origins among the ancient local populations and continued after the arrival of Mycenean Greek colonisers. It is also related to the presence of the river Sabato flowing through the hilly terrain. The name of the river comes from the Sabines, identified by the names Sabus or Sabatini, a tribe of Samnite people who settled in the Sabatus river basin. Historically this area became established as a centre for the development of viticulture in the 19th century thanks to the discovery of huge sulphur deposits in the municipality of Tufo. The presence and availability of sulphur benefitted vine cultivation throughout the district of Irpinia and gave rise to the technique of using sulphur to protect the grape bunches from external pathogens. This activity made a significant contribution to the development of related industries throughout the area, which lasted until 1983 when sulphur ceased to be mined.

The establishment of the Regia Scuola di Viticoltura e Enologia [Royal School of Viticulture and Oenology] in Avellino contributed to making the area one of the important Italian centres of viticulture, promoting cultivation of the Greco variety throughout the mid-Sabato valley.

The presence of the viticultural school as a driver of socio-economic progress was to put the wine-growing sector of the province of Avellino at the forefront for wine production and export in Italy.

At academic level, the technical and economic value of ‘Greco di Tufo’ products has been repeatedly recognised in studies of grape varieties and oenology.

The natural and human factors described above, combined with the genetic characteristics of the Greco variety, produce quality wines, including sparkling wines. Indeed, all the ‘Greco di Tufo’ PDO wines are characterised by freshness, body and complexity. As they are suitable for ageing, a version with the indication ‘Riserva’ is also produced.

9.   Essential further conditions (packaging, labelling, other requirements)

‘Greco di Tufo’ and ‘Greco di Tufo Spumante’ PDO

Legal framework:

In national legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

‘Greco di Tufo’ wines must be released for consumption in bottles or other containers made of glass with a capacity not exceeding 5 litres. With the exception of wines of the ‘Spumante’ type, they must be closed with flanged stoppers made of the materials permitted by the legislation in force. For containers of 0,187 litres or less, use of screw caps is permitted.

Link to the product specification

https://www.politicheagricole.it/flex/cm/pages/ServeBLOB.php/L/IT/IDPagina/16173


(1)  OJ L 9, 11.1.2019, p. 2.


22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/23


Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

(2021/C 61/09)

This communication is published in accordance with Article 17(5) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33 (1)

COMMUNICATING THE APPROVAL OF A STANDARD AMENDMENT

‘FIANO DI AVELLINO’

PDO-IT-A0232-AM02

Date of communication: 10 November 2020

DESCRIPTION OF AND REASONS FOR THE APPROVED AMENDMENT

1.   Rewording of section on types – Introduction of ‘Riserva’ version

The ‘Riserva’ version has been introduced and therefore needs to be included in the types of wine covered by the specification.

The reason for this amendment is to raise the profile of the ‘Fiano di Avellino’ PDO by highlighting the longevity of the wines produced, taking account of the local custom of placing the wine on the market after it has been aged for a number of years.

Moreover, in accordance with the applicable legislation, the adjective ‘bianco’ (white) after the name ‘Fiano di Avellino’ has also been removed.

This amendment concerns Articles 1, 2 and 6 of the specification and Section 4 of the single document.

2.   Introduction of possibility to carry out emergency irrigation

Given the climate change already underway and the increasingly severe water and thermal stress affecting plants, this possibility is being allowed to ensure their normal physiological development.

This amendment concerns Article 4 of the specification but does not concern the single document.

3.   Introduction of ‘Riserva’ type and ageing period

With a view to differentiating ‘Fiano di Avellino’ Riserva, it has been deemed appropriate to specify the minimum ageing period and the date from which this period is counted.

This amendment concerns Article 5 of the specification and Section 5(a) of the single document.

4.   Description of ‘Fiano di Avellino’ PDO wines including ‘Riserva’ type – adaptation of analytical and organoleptic characteristics

The adjective ‘bianco’ (white) after the name of the ‘Fiano di Avellino’ designation has been deleted.

This is a change in wording for reasons of consistency with the name of the product.

In the section on the characteristics on consumption, the term ‘dry’ has been added to the description of the taste as it is a characteristic of the wines currently being produced under this PDO.

Following the introduction of the new ‘Fiano di Avellino’ Riserva type, its chemico-physical and organoleptic characteristics on consumption have been added. The data and the descriptions refer to a high-quality product with medium to long ageing in the cellar.

This amendment concerns Article 6 of the specification and Section 4 of the single document.

5.   Link with geographical area – Adjustment of the form of the specification

The text has been adapted and the specification and the single document have been aligned in terms of content.

It is an adjustment of the form that does not invalidate the geographical link referred to in Article 93(1)(a)(i) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013.

This amendment concerns Article 8 of the specification and Section 8 of the single document.

SINGLE DOCUMENT

1.   Name of the product

Fiano di Avellino

2.   Geographical indication type

PDO – Protected Designation of Origin

3.   Categories of grapevine product

1.

Wine

4.   Description of the wine(s)

‘Fiano di Avellino’

Colour: straw yellow of varying intensity.

Aroma: pleasant, intense, fine, distinctive.

Taste: dry, fresh, harmonious.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 11,5 %.

Minimum sugar-free extract: 16 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

‘Fiano di Avellino’ Riserva

Colour: straw yellow of varying intensity.

Aroma: pleasant, intense, fine.

Taste: dry, fresh, harmonious.

Minimum total alcoholic strength by volume: 12 %.

Minimum sugar-free extract: 17 g/l.

Any analytical parameters not shown in the table below comply with the limits laid down in national and EU legislation.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume):

 

Minimum total acidity:

5 grams per litre expressed as tartaric acid

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre):

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre):

 

5.   Wine-making practices

a.   Specific oenological practices

‘Fiano di Avellino’‘Riserva’ – Minimum ageing period

Specific oenological practice

In the case of ‘Fiano di Avellino’‘Riserva’, the minimum ageing period must be at least 12 months counting from 1 November of the year of the harvest.

b.   Maximum yields

‘Fiano di Avellino’ and ‘Fiano di Avellino’ Riserva

10 000 kg of grapes per hectare

6.   Demarcated geographical area

The production area of the grapes used in the production of ‘Fiano di Avellino’ DOCG wines covers the entire administrative area of the following municipalities in the province of Avellino: Avellino, Lapio, Atripalda, Cesinali, Aiello del Sabato, S. Stefano del Sole, Sorbo Serpico, Salza Irpina, Parolise, S. Potito Ultra, Candida, Manocalzati, Pratola Serra, Montefredane, Grottolella, Capriglia Irpina, S. Angelo a Scala, Summonte, Mercogliano, Forino, Contrada, Monteforte Irpino, Ospedaletto d’Alpinolo, Montefalcione, Santa Lucia di Serino and San Michele di Serino.

7.   Main wine grape variety(ies)

Fiano B.

8.   Description of the link(s)

‘Fiano di Avellino’ PDO wine

Natural factors:

The demarcated area for the ‘Fiano di Avellino’ DOCG is located between the Calore and Sabato valleys, the slopes of Monte Parteno and the hills surrounding the Lauro valley. In terms of relief, the landscape mostly consists of vast expanses of hilly terrain in between mountain slopes. Together with the predominantly south-east/south-west exposure of the vineyards, situated in areas that are exceptionally well-suited to vine cultivation, this creates a suitably breezy and bright environment that provides the plant with ideal growing conditions.

The considerable size of the area also means that it presents major geological variations. While there are some soils with a lime-clay substrate and volcanic traces, other locations feature hard, compact rocks or mostly clay compounds.

Historical and human factors

Vines have been grown in the area since ancient times. This is linked to the presence of the Sabato river which cuts across the area’s hilly terrain. Its name is derived from the Sabines, named after Sabus or the Sabatini, a Samnite tribe that settled in the Sabatus river basin.

Historical sources have traced the origin of the term ‘Apiano’ to wine produced in the agricultural area formerly known as ‘Apia’ – the present-day municipality of Lapio – located in the hills east of Avellino at an altitude of 590 m above sea level. The word ‘Apiano’ may also be derived from ‘Api’ (bees), given that they tend to swarm around the grape bunches, lured by the sweetness of the grapes.

The Royal School of Winegrowing and Oenology (Regia Scuola di Viticoltura e Enologia) in Avellino has helped to make the area one of the most important winegrowing centres in Italy, promoting the cultivation of the ‘Fiano’ grape variety in the production area and throughout the middle valley of the Sabato river.

The School of Winegrowing has been a catalyst for socio-economic development and this has resulted in the winegrowing sector in Avellino becoming one of the leading Italian provinces in the production and export of wine.

On a scientific level, the technical and economic soundness of ‘Fiano di Avellino’ wines has been acknowledged in all of the vine variety and oenology studies conducted to date.

The ‘Fiano di Avellino’ PDO represents the excellence of white wines in Southern Italy: known for their characteristic freshness, finesse and pleasing minerality, the fact that they age well means ‘Riserva’ versions are also produced.

The combination of the natural factors described above with the inveterate tradition of winegrowing in this area of the province of Avellino and the continuous technical and scientific contributions that have had a major impact on the crops and technology has helped to improve quality and raise the profile of ‘Fiano di Avellino’ PDO wines on the domestic and international markets.

9.   Essential further conditions (packaging, labelling, other requirements)

‘Fiano di Avellino’ and ‘Fiano di Avellino’ Riserva – PDO

Legal framework:

In national legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

‘Fiano di Avellino’ PDO wines must be presented for consumption in bottles or other glass containers with a capacity of not more than 5 litres, closed with a flanged stopper made of a material authorised under the applicable legislation. The use of screw caps is allowed for containers with a capacity of not more than 0,187 litres.

Link to the product specification

https://www.politicheagricole.it/flex/cm/pages/ServeBLOB.php/L/IT/IDPagina/16174


(1)  OJ L 9, 11.1.2019, p. 2.


22.2.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 61/27


Publication of an application for registration of a name pursuant to Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs

(2021/C 61/10)

This publication confers the right to oppose the application pursuant to Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council (1) within three months from the date of this publication.

SINGLE DOCUMENT

‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’

EU No: PGI-FR-02446 – 3.1.2019

PDO ( ) PGI (X)

1.   Name(s)

‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’

2.   Member State or third country

France

3.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff

3.1.   Type of product

Class 1.6. Fruit, vegetables and cereals, fresh or processed

3.2.   Description of the product to which the name in (1) applies

‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ is a red table cherry obtained from cultivars of Prunus avium L., Prunus cerasus L. or their hybrids and supplied fresh to consumers. It has the following characteristics:

Minimum size of 24 mm. A tolerance of 5 % by number of cherries measuring less than 24 mm per tray is accepted, but none of the cherries may measure 22 mm or less,

Optimal ripeness determined on the basis of three colour ranges and a minimum sugar content for harvest, depending on the variety,

Varieties

Hâtif Burlat, Summit

Belge, Van, Géant d’Hedelfingen

Folfer

Colour

(CTIFL colour code)

3 to 4

4 to 5

5 to 6

Minimum sugar content

11,5° brix

12,5° brix

15° brix

Where containers hold a single variety of cherry, they must be of a uniform colour.

3.3.   Feed (for products of animal origin only) and raw materials (for processed products only)

3.4.   Specific steps in production that must take place in the defined geographical area

The steps that must take place in the geographical area are production, harvesting, sorting and sizing.

3.5.   Specific rules concerning slicing, grating, packaging, etc. of the product to which the registered name refers

The PGI cherries are packed in containers holding up to 6 kg. If the cherries are packed in punnets, the weight of the tray holding them may be greater than this, but not more than 10 kg, with each punnet weighing no more than 3 kg.

3.6.   Specific rules concerning labelling of the product to which the registered name refers

In addition to the mandatory information required by the rules on the labelling and presentation of foodstuffs, the labelling must feature the registered name of the product and the EU PGI logo in the same visual field.

4.   Concise definition of the geographical area

The geographical area defined for the production of ‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ stretches up the foothills of Mont Ventoux from the Comtat Venaissin plains to the west and the Luberon massif to the south in the department of Vaucluse. This is the area where ‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ is actually grown and where post-harvest handling takes place.

The geographical area covers the following communes in the department of Vaucluse:

Ansouis, Apt, Aubignan, Auribeau, Le Barroux, La Bastidonne, Le Beaucet, Beaumettes, Beaumont-du-Ventoux, Bédoin, Blauvac, Bonnieux, Buoux, Cabrières-d’Aigues, Cabrières-d’Avignon, Cadenet, Caromb, Carpentras, Caseneuve, Castellet, Crestet, Crillon-le-Brave, Cucuron, Entrechaux, Flassan, Fontaine-de-Vaucluse, Gargas, Gignac, Gordes, Goult, Grambois, L’Isle-sur-la-Sorgue, Joucas, Lacoste, Lafare, Lagnes, Lauris, Lioux, Lourmarin, Malaucène, Malemort-du-Comtat, Maubec, Mazan, Ménerbes, Mérindol, Méthamis, Modène, Mormoiron, La Motte-d'Aigues, Murs, Oppède, Pernes-les-Fontaines, Pertuis, Peypin-d'Aigues, Puget, Puyvert, Robion, La Roque-Alric, La Roque-sur-Pernes, Roussillon, Rustrel, Saignon, Saint-Didier, Saint-Hippolyte-le-Graveyron, Saint-Marcellin-lès-Vaison, Saint-Martin-de-Castillon, Saint-Martin-de-la-Brasque, Saint-Pantaléon, Saint-Pierre-de-Vassols, Saint-Romain-en-Viennois, Saint-Saturnin-lès-Apt, Sannes, Saumane-de-Vaucluse, Sivergues, Suzette, Taillades, La Tour-d’Aigues, Vaison-la-Romaine, Vaugines, Venasque, Viens, Villars, Villedieu, Villelaure, Villes-sur-Auzon.

5.   Link with the geographical area

The link with the geographical area is founded on the reputation of ‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ and a specific quality due notably to the climatic conditions and local expertise. The cherry trees are grown in a production area where red table cherries have been a traditional crop for centuries and this is the basis for the product’s reputation. The cherries have a perfectly balanced ripeness due to especially favourable natural factors in the geographical area and they are big because the growers know exactly how to prune the trees.

In this production area, cherries are a traditional crop that has been grown for hundreds of years (the first written references to the importance of cherry growing in the area date from the 17th century). At that time, they were grown essentially for family consumption. The trees grew in family gardens, but could also be found dotted among cereal crops in the fields and on embankments. It is a traditional red table cherry growing area.

The ‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ production area is situated in a unique environment, nestling against Mont Ventoux and the slopes of the Vaucluse mountains and the Luberon massif, where altitudes can vary from 50 to 600 metres. The area is under the influence of a Mediterranean climate and is known for its plentiful sunshine (2 760 hours a year) and the Mistral, a strong northerly wind which does, however, subside as it approaches the slopes of Mont Ventoux. There is also a marked variation between day-time and night-time temperatures, due to the cool air masses that flow down from the summit of Mont Ventoux (1 912 m).

Over the years, specific expertise has developed in the management of pedestrian orchards, to facilitate cultivation work (especially pruning) and make it easier for pickers to reach the fruit. These orchards are pruned every year in order to guarantee consistent production and above all to help the trees produce good-sized fruit.

The cherries are picked by hand only. This is done by experienced pickers who are trained in the use of the cherry colour code produced by the Centre Technique Interprofessionnel des Fruits et Légumes (CTIFL). Following the recommendations of the colour code for each variety, the pickers refer to the colour code for each variety in order to select fruit with an optimal sugar-acidity ratio. For each new or old variety, CTIFL has matched the colour of the fruit to the sugar-acidity ratio. Thus, for each variety an optimal colour has been established, which corresponds to the best sugar-acidity ratio.

Sorting and sizing are always preferably carried out in the field, although the introduction of cherry sizers in the early 2000s means that sizing operations are now sometimes carried out indoors. Whether the cherries are sized manually or by machine, the operators’ expertise is crucial to ensure careful handling of a fragile fruit and to preserve its quality. These practices allow batches of fruit to be placed on the market that are very uniform in terms of size and colour.

The orchards are planted with cherry trees selected for their ability to produce large, firm, shiny and flavoursome fruit. The trees are pruned every year to guarantee consistent production but above all to produce good-sized fruit.

‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ gained its reputation because of its size but also because it can be found on the market from the beginning of May until mid-July. These cherries are available on the market for over two months because the orchards are planted at varying altitudes, as described under natural factors, but also because not all the varieties grown ripen at the same time.

Many cherry markets were set up, attesting to the economic importance of the crop. The first was established in La Tour-d’Aigues in 1902 and others were set up in the neighbouring communes. They were held daily and consignors would come to buy the cherries from the producers by mutual agreement.

Given the scale of production, the communes of Ventoux joined forces to set up a market in the commune of Saint Didier in 1960.

Three Marchés d’Intérêt Nationaux or national wholesale markets (Avignon, Chateaurenard and Cavaillon) and the terminal market in Carpentras opened in the 1960s. They ensure transparency with regard to supply and demand and more openness with regard to prices.

‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ is a table cherry that is supplied fresh to consumers. It is harvested at the point of optimal ripeness according to the CTIFL colour code and the minimum sugar content laid down for each variety. It is distinguished in particular by its large size (minimum 24 mm). Thanks to the operators’ expertise in sorting and sizing, the cherries in each container are uniform in colour and size.

‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’ is a product that has specific qualities but also depends on the growers’ expertise and has a historical reputation.

Climatic conditions in the production area are unique, with plenty of sunshine and the northerly wind known as the Mistral. These conditions help prevent the development of diseases and favour early cropping in the sheltered areas and later cropping at higher altitudes.

In the geographical area there is a marked difference between day-time and night-time temperatures, which favours the production of ripe, firm fruit with a strong colour. This adaptation is evidenced by the leading position of these cherries on the national market.

The growing methods, such as use of the pedestrian orchard system and regular pruning, are key factors in making it possible to consistently obtain a uniform crop of good-sized fruit at the optimal stage of ripeness.

Mastery of the sorting and sizing operations comes from experience linked to the long-standing expertise of generations of growers. It guarantees the production of batches of fruit that are uniform in terms of both colour and size.

Because they are fragile, cherries must be sorted and sized quickly (within 48 hours of harvesting) and in containers of limited capacity to avoid crushing the fruit.

For over 25 years, the information campaigns of the producers’ union have helped build the reputation of ‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’. The product’s excellent reputation led to it being presented at the opening of the French pavilion at the Milan Expo by the French President on 21 June 2015, where among ‘[…] top quality produce […] French fruit [on show included] Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux […]’ (O & Q Hebdo, 21 June 2015). France Télévisions has shown several reports focusing on the product’s specific characteristics; for example, the report on the one o’clock news on the France 2 channel on 4 June 2019, which can be found on the francetvinfo.fr website, showing the work of operators at an orchard north of Carpentras and explaining that: ‘Only the best cherries will be sold […] [and] they are sorted by hand according to size (more than 24 mm) and colour’. Other specialist print journals, such as Rungis Actualités of May 2019, also mention the distinctive characteristics of ‘Cerise des coteaux du Ventoux’, namely: ‘[…] the ripeness of the fruit and their size, which must be over 24 mm, […] [linked with] the sorting methods, either manual or mechanised’.

Publication reference of the specification

(the second subparagraph of Article 6(1) of the Regulation)

https://extranet.inao.gouv.fr/fichier/CDC-CeriseCVentoux200619.pdf


(1)  OJ L 343, 14.12.2012, p. 1.