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Document 32018D0829(02)

Commission Implementing Decision of 21 August 2018 on the publication in the Official Journal of the European Union of the application for registration of a name referred to in Article 49 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council (‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ (PDO))

C/2018/5637

OJ C 303, 29.8.2018, p. 12–16 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

In force

29.8.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 303/12


COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING DECISION

of 21 August 2018

on the publication in the Official Journal of the European Union of the application for registration of a name referred to in Article 49 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council

(‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ (PDO))

(2018/C 303/05)

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

Having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 November 2012 on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs (1), and in particular Article 50(2)(a) thereof,

Whereas:

(1)

The United Kingdom has sent to the Commission an application for protection of the name ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ in accordance with Article 49(4) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012.

(2)

In accordance with Article 50 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 the Commission has examined that application and concluded that it fulfils the conditions laid down in that Regulation.

(3)

In order to allow for the submission of notices of opposition in accordance with Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, the single document and the reference to the publication of the product specification referred to in Article 50(2)(a) of that Regulation for the name ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ should be published in the Official Journal of the European Union,

HAS DECIDED AS FOLLOWS:

Sole Article

The single document and the reference to the publication of the product specification referred to in Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 for the name ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ (PDO) are contained in the Annex to this Decision.

In accordance with Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, the publication of this Decision shall confer the right to oppose to the registration of the name referred to in the first paragraph of this Article within three months from the date of publication of this Decision in the Official Journal of the European Union.

Done at Brussels, 21 August 2018.

For the Commission

Pierre MOSCOVICI

Member of the Commission


(1)  OJ L 343, 14.12.2012, p. 1.


ANNEX

SINGLE DOCUMENT

‘THE VALE OF CLWYD DENBIGH PLUM’

EU No: PDO-GB-02287 – 8.2.2017

PDO ( X ) PGI ( )

1.   Name(s)

‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’

2.   Member State or Third Country

United Kingdom

3.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff

3.1.   Type of product

Class 1.6 Fruit, vegetables and cereals fresh or processed

3.2.   Description of product to which the name in 1 applies

‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’Prunus domestica Linnaeus ‘Denbigh Plum’ is the name given to the Denbigh plum grown in the designated geographical area of the Vale of Clwyd in Denbighshire in North Wales from where the plum originates. The Denbigh plum is the only plum variety native to Wales.

‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ has the following characteristics depending upon whether the plum is required for culinary purposes and harvested mid-August before they are ripe or required as a dessert plum when the plum is allowed to remain and ripen on the tree and harvested in late August early September.

Culinary

Plum firm to touch

Orangey-red in colour with yellow patches when the plum begins to ripen

Wax bloom starting to show

Flesh is firm and of a rich yellow with greenish amber tint

Flesh clings to stone

Size 45 mm to 65 mm stalk end to tip

40 mm to 55 mm crossway diameter

Dessert

Plum starting to soften when gently squeezed

Size 45 mm to 65 mm stalk end to tip

40 mm to 55 mm crossway diameter

Shape — Spherical or slightly elliptical

Colour — Rich red shading towards purple, strewn with golden speckles. Fruit naturally becomes darker as the fruit ages

Plums covered with a wax bloom (visible whitish bloom) which develops the longer they remain on the tree

Naturally soft and juicy flesh which is a rich yellow in colour with greenish amber tint

Flesh — only partially adheres to the stone

Mean number of fruit per kg 9-15 (mean 12)

Brix test (measure of sweetness) 16-19.

With dessert plums, the skin is soft and delicate and should be exempt from bruising. This requires handling the ripened fruit with great care.

The dessert plums have a long growing season which gives the plum more time to fully develop its depth of flavour which is sub acid and sweet. It is this depth of flavour and sweetness which makes ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ distinctive.

When cooked the depth of flavour intensifies and the natural sweetness of the plum is enhanced. The texture of the fruit melts in the mouth if eaten when warm.

Most of ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ are sold as dessert plums fresh in local markets.

3.3.   Feed (for products of animal origin only) and raw materials (for processed products only)

‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ must be grown in the identified designated area from trees obtained from grafting or budding by commercial tree nurseries from known specimens or from individual trees located within the designated area. The ‘Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ must NOT be derived from trees grown from seed. As pollination cannot be controlled, trees grown from seed contain genetic variation and therefore cannot be guaranteed to grow to ‘type’.

3.4.   Specific steps in production that must take place in the identified geographical area

Growing

Pruning (if required)

Pest and disease management/manuring and spraying

Harvesting

Storage (if required)

3.5.   Specific rules concerning slicing, grating, packaging, etc. of the product the registered name refers to

3.6.   Specific rules concerning labelling of the product the registered name refers to

4.   Concise definition of the geographical area

The ‘Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ is grown in the designated geographical area of the Vale of Clwyd in Denbighshire North Wales which encompasses the following wards:

Aberwheeler,

Bodfari,

Cefn Meiriadog,

Clocaenog,

Cyffylliog,

Denbigh,

Efenechtyd,

Henllan,

Llanbedr Dyffryn Clwyd,

Llandyrnog,

Llanelidan,

Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd,

Llangynhafal,

Llanrhaeadr yng Nghinmeirch,

Llanynys,

Nantglyn,

Rhuddlan,

Ruthin,

St Asaph,

Trefnant,

Tremeirchion Cwm,

Waen.

And the ward of Llansannan

5.   Link with the geographical area

The Denbigh Plum originates in the Vale of Clwyd and is the only plum variety native to Wales. The specific environmental and geographical factors in the Vale of Clwyd provide the perfect conditions for these native plums to thrive, and contributes to the specific characteristics of the fruit.

The Vale of Clwyd is a river valley region in North Wales, largely sheltered by surrounding hills including the Clwydian range on the eastern side which runs in a transverse direction from south-east to north-west and is only exposed to the north wind where it opens outward at the coast. The hills provide shelter from the prevailing westerly winds and often cold easterlies. This relatively sheltered environment is essential for plum production as it helps reduce damage to both the blossom and the developing plum.

The Vale of Clwyd represents the most extensive area of Grade 1 and Grade 2 land in Wales according to the Agricultural Land Classification (ALC). The ALC takes into consideration characteristics such as climate, site and soil. As Grade 1 and 2 land, The Vale of Clwyd is defined as either ‘excellent quality’ or ‘very good’ agricultural land. This land is capable of producing consistently high yields of Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plums.

The land in the Vale of Clwyd is some of the most naturally fertile soils in the UK providing all the nutrients that the trees and plums require. The soils present in the Vale have the ability to retain nutrients such as potassium, magnesium and calcium which are key nutrient requirements for these plums.

The free draining medium textured deep soils (which are naturally occurring in the Vale of Clwyd), encourage the development of strong root architecture which is vital for the plum trees and the production of quality Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plums.

The limestone geology underlying new soft red Triassic sandstone in the area produces lime rich soils with high pH. Most fruit such as strawberries and raspberries do better on slightly acidic soils, however these plums thrive on the high pH limestone derived soils which are prevalent in the area.

The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum flowers in April and is very susceptible to spring radiation frosts which can have a deleterious effect on the blossom. The influence of the nearby gulfstream provides a microclimate to the Vale of Clwyd that provides a moderating influence and reduces the risk from frosts. In addition the cool moderate temperatures from the gulf stream both extends the flowering period which enables greater pollination, and enables the plum to slowly mature over a prolonged period which provides more time for its flavour to fully develop and intensify.

Historically this region with its fertile soils has had a tradition and reputation for the production of an array of soft fruit production including plums, all of which would have been exhibited at the Vale of Clwyd Horticultural shows, which were famous annual events since the 1850s. By the late 1890s, Denbighshire (which is the main county in the Vale of Clwyd) was the largest county area of soft fruit in Wales. The history of plum production has marked the local area, with streets and houses in Denbigh named after ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’. One local property which has been in the same family for over a hundred years has an orchard which still produces ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ for the commercial market.

The knowledge and skill required for growing ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ in the designated area has developed over time. Specific human skills associated with the growing of this fruit which have been passed down from one generation to the next, including: planting and establishment of the plum trees, pruning and tree management, when to harvest, and handling the fruit.

The skin of ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ is very soft and delicate compared to more commercially produced plums; this necessitates the fruit should be handled with great care to avoid damage and bruising. Fruit pickers are trained to handle the fruit as little as possible and to pick the fruit by hand by their stems. As a result, freshly picked plums often have a whitish bloom (which protects the fruit) still visible on the fruit.

The Vale of Clwyd benefits from its own microclimate which is affected by the moderating influence of the Gulf Stream and favours the growth of these plums. Plums are among the earliest fruits to blossom and a frost free site is essential to achieve regular cropping as frost poses a severe threat to blossoming trees.

The Denbigh Plum has, unlike most other plums a natural resistance to fungal disease which enables it to remain remarkably disease free despite the warm/damp climate. The Vales climate is also cooler in comparison to other plum growing areas. This provides ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ with a long growing season which gives the plum more time to fully develop its flavour. It is this depth of flavour and sweetness which makes ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ so distinctive.

The close proximity of the sea and the river Clwyd that runs through the valley not only moderates extreme temperatures but also provides a source of natural irrigation which in combination with the natural high water table in the Vale of Clwyd, satisfies the high moisture requirements of the deep rooted plum trees preventing the need for artificial irrigation.

‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ has managed not only to survive but to thrive in the natural conditions found in this area with minimal human intervention. This sheltered, flat, fertile and lime rich area’s microclimate with its moderate temperatures natural irrigation system and probability of frost free days during the plum blossoming period, provides the ideal growing conditions for ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ and contributes to their specific and unique characteristics.

Until recently, production of ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ had largely died out. However in recent years it has experienced a resurgence, bringing together communities in the designated area, and has resulted in the annual ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ Feast, which is attended by over 2 000 visitors. This festival showcases the fresh fruit, and the array of products in which it can be used.

The famous Welsh celebrity Chef, Bryn Williams, has become the patron of ‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ and it is featured in his recipe book, ‘the Love of Veg.’‘The Vale of Clwyd Denbigh Plum’ is recognised throughout Wales and the rest of the UK for its excellence, and is actively sourced by local catering establishments, and has also been nominated by the Slow Food Movement for an Ark of Taste award.

Reference to publication of the specification

(the second subparagraph of Article 6(1) of this Regulation)

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/676695/pfn-vale-clwyd-denbigh-plum.pdf


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