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Document 32024D1484

Council Decision (CFSP) 2024/1484 of 27 May 2024 concerning restrictive measures in view of the situation in Russia

ST/8273/2024/INIT

OJ L, 2024/1484, 27.5.2024, ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/dec/2024/1484/oj (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, GA, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

Legal status of the document In force

ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/dec/2024/1484/oj

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Official Journal
of the European Union

EN

L series


2024/1484

27.5.2024

COUNCIL DECISION (CFSP) 2024/1484

of 27 May 2024

concerning restrictive measures in view of the situation in Russia

THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION,

Having regard to the Treaty on European Union, and in particular Article 29 thereof,

Having regard to the proposal from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy,

Whereas:

(1)

On 4 March 2022, the Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law that blocks access to Facebook and to Twitter, currently known as X, and imposes prison sentences on those deemed to be spreading false information about Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine. That law has led to the imprisonment of numerous individuals protesting against, or disseminating information related to, Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine.

(2)

On 17 April 2023, the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (the ‘High Representative’) stated that the Union strongly condemns the sentencing of opposition politician, democracy activist and outspoken Kremlin critic Vladimir Kara-Murza to 25 years in prison on politically motivated charges. The High Representative stated that the ‘trial’ did not meet the international standards of a fair and public hearing by a competent, impartial and independent tribunal, and that the court’s decision clearly demonstrates yet again the political misuse of the judiciary in order to pressure activists, human rights defenders and any voices opposing Russia’s illegal war of aggression against Ukraine.

(3)

On 29 October 2023, the High Representative stated that the Union honours the victims of political repression in Russia, and called for the immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners, including Yuri Dmitriev, Vladimir Kara-Murza, Ilya Yashin, Alexei Gorinov and Ivan Safronov. He also expressed concern over reports of ill-treatment, harassment and physical and psychological torture by Russian prison authorities, and the increasing harassment of human rights lawyers in Russia.

(4)

On 30 November 2023, Russia’s Supreme Court outlawed what it called the ‘international LGBT public movement’ as ‘extremist’ and banned its activity on Russian territory. On 1 December 2023, the High Representative stated that the Union strongly condemns that decision, and that that decision aims to further persecute the LGBTIQ community in Russia and to stifle civil society and those courageously defending human rights.

(5)

On 19 February 2024, the High Representative issued a statement on behalf of the Union expressing outrage at the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and stating that the ultimate responsibility for his death lies with President Putin and the Russian authorities. The High Representative urged Russia to allow an independent and transparent international investigation into the circumstances of Alexei Navalny’s death, and asserted that it is yet another sign of the accelerating and systematic repression in Russia.

(6)

On 27 February 2024, the High Representative stated that the Union is appalled by the sentencing of Oleg Orlov, a prominent human rights defender and co-chair of renowned human rights organisation Memorial, to two and a half years in prison on politically motivated charges. The High Representative called on the Russian authorities to immediately and unconditionally release all political prisoners and to abandon their oppressive legislation used to suppress civil society and independent voices, and stated that the Union stands in solidarity with all Russian citizens who have raised their voice and criticised Russia’s war and who have been detained, prosecuted or imprisoned for this.

(7)

In its conclusions of 22 March 2024, the European Council called, inter alia, for the immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners in Russia and an end to the persecution of the political opposition. Furthermore, it called for work to be taken forward in the Council to establish a new sanctions regime in view of the situation in Russia.

(8)

In view of the deterioration and gravity of the situation in Russia, restrictive measures should be imposed on natural or legal persons, entities or bodies responsible for serious human rights violations or abuses, for the repression of civil society and democratic opposition, and for undermining democracy and the rule of law in Russia, and on natural or legal persons, entities or bodies associated with them. Therefore, the Council considers that 19 natural persons and 1 legal person should be added to the list of natural and legal persons, entities and bodies set out in the Annex to this Decision.

(9)

Furthermore, it is appropriate to introduce restrictions on exporting items which might be used for internal repression, as well as items intended primarily for use in the monitoring or interception of information security and telecommunication.

(10)

Further action by the Union is needed in order to implement certain measures,

HAS ADOPTED THIS DECISION:

Article 1

1.   Member States shall take the necessary measures to prevent the entry into, or transit through, their territories of natural persons who:

(a)

are responsible for serious violations or abuses of human rights or for the repression of civil society and democratic opposition, or whose activities otherwise seriously undermine democracy or the rule of law in Russia;

(b)

provide financial, technical, or material support for, or are otherwise involved in, the acts set out in point (a), including by planning, directing, ordering, assisting, preparing, facilitating or encouraging such acts;

(c)

are associated with the natural persons referred to in point (a) or (b),

as listed in the Annex.

2.   Paragraph 1 shall not oblige a Member State to refuse its own nationals entry into its territory.

3.   Paragraph 1 shall be without prejudice to the cases where a Member State is bound by an obligation of international law, namely:

(a)

as a host country to an international intergovernmental organisation;

(b)

as a host country to an international conference convened by, or under the auspices of, the United Nations;

(c)

under a multilateral agreement conferring privileges and immunities; or

(d)

under the 1929 Treaty of Conciliation (Lateran pact) concluded by the Holy See (State of the Vatican City) and Italy.

4.   Paragraph 3 shall also apply in cases where a Member State is host country of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).

5.   The Council shall be duly informed in all cases where a Member State grants an exemption pursuant to paragraph 3 or 4.

6.   Member States may grant exemptions from the measures imposed under paragraph 1 where entry or transit is justified on the grounds of urgent humanitarian need, or on the grounds of attending intergovernmental meetings or meetings promoted or hosted by the Union, or hosted by a Member State holding the Chairmanship in office of the OSCE, where a political dialogue is conducted that directly promotes the policy objectives of the restrictive measures, including support for the rule of law, democracy and human rights in Russia.

7.   Member States may also grant exemptions from the measures imposed under paragraph 1 where entry or transit is necessary for the fulfilment of a judicial process.

8.   A Member State wishing to grant the exemptions referred to in paragraph 6 or 7 shall notify the Council in writing. The exemption shall be deemed to be granted unless one or more of the Council members raises an objection in writing within 2 working days of receiving notification of the proposed exemption. Should one or more of the Council members raise an objection, the Council, acting by qualified majority, may decide to grant the proposed exemption.

9.   Where, pursuant to paragraphs 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8, a Member State authorises the entry into, or transit through, its territory of persons listed in the Annex, the authorisation shall be limited to the purpose for which it is given to the person concerned thereby.

Article 2

1.   All funds and economic resources belonging to, owned, held or controlled by natural or legal persons, entities or bodies that:

(a)

are responsible for serious violations or abuses of human rights or the repression of civil society and democratic opposition, or whose activities otherwise seriously undermine democracy or the rule of law in Russia;

(b)

provide financial, technical, or material support for, or are otherwise involved in, acts set out in point (a), including by planning, directing, ordering, assisting, preparing, facilitating or encouraging such acts;

(c)

are associated with the natural or legal persons, entities or bodies referred to in point (a) or (b),

as listed in the Annex, shall be frozen.

2.   No funds or economic resources shall be made available, directly or indirectly, to or for the benefit of natural or legal persons, entities or bodies listed in the Annex.

3.   By way of derogation from paragraphs 1 and 2, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise the release of certain frozen funds or economic resources, or the making available of certain funds or economic resources, under such conditions as they deem appropriate, after having determined that the funds or economic resources concerned are:

(a)

necessary to satisfy the basic needs of the persons listed in the Annex and their dependent family members, including payments for foodstuffs, rent or mortgage, medicines and medical treatment, taxes, insurance premiums, and public utility charges;

(b)

intended exclusively for the payment of reasonable professional fees and the reimbursement of incurred expenses associated with the provision of legal services;

(c)

intended exclusively for the payment of fees or service charges for the routine holding or maintenance of frozen funds or economic resources;

(d)

necessary for extraordinary expenses, provided that the competent authority has notified the competent authorities of the other Member States and the Commission of the grounds on which it considers that a specific authorisation should be granted, at least 2 weeks prior to the authorisation; or

(e)

to be paid into or from an account of a diplomatic mission or consular post or an international organisation enjoying immunities in accordance with international law, in so far as such payments are intended to be used for official purposes of the diplomatic mission or consular post or international organisation,

The Member State concerned shall inform the other Member States and the Commission of any authorisation granted under this paragraph within 2 weeks of the authorisation.

4.   By way of derogation from paragraph 1, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise the release of certain frozen funds or economic resources, provided that the following conditions are met:

(a)

the funds or economic resources are the subject of an arbitral decision rendered prior to the date on which the natural or legal person, entity or body referred to in paragraph 1 was listed in the Annex, or of a judicial or administrative decision rendered in the Union, or a judicial decision enforceable in the Member State concerned, prior to or after that date;

(b)

the funds or economic resources will be used exclusively to satisfy claims secured by such a decision or recognised as valid in such a decision, within the limits set by applicable laws and regulations governing the rights of persons having such claims;

(c)

the decision is not for the benefit of a natural or legal person, entity or body listed in the Annex; and

(d)

recognition of the decision is not contrary to public policy in the Member State concerned.

The Member State concerned shall inform the other Member States and the Commission of any authorisation granted under this paragraph within 2 weeks of the authorisation.

5.   Paragraph 1 shall not prevent a natural or legal person, entity or body listed in the Annex from making a payment due under a contract entered into prior to the date on which such natural or legal person, entity or body was listed therein, provided that the Member State concerned has determined that the payment is not, directly or indirectly, received by a natural or legal person, entity or body referred to in paragraph 1.

6.   Paragraph 2 shall not apply to the addition to frozen accounts of:

(a)

interest or other earnings on those accounts;

(b)

payments due under contracts, agreements or obligations that were concluded or arose prior to the date on which those accounts became subject to the measures provided for in paragraphs 1 and 2; or

(c)

payments due under judicial, administrative or arbitral decisions rendered in the Union or enforceable in the Member State concerned,

provided that any such interest, other earnings and payments remain subject to the measures provided for in paragraph 1.

7.   By way of derogation from paragraphs 1 and 2, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise the release of certain frozen funds or economic resources, or the making available of certain funds or economic resources, under such conditions as they deem appropriate, after having determined that the provision of such funds or economic resources is necessary to ensure the timely delivery of humanitarian assistance or to support other activities that support basic human needs.

8.   By way of derogation from paragraphs 1 and 2, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise the release of certain frozen economic resources, after having determined that this is necessary for:

(a)

the functioning of diplomatic and consular representations of the Union and of the Member States or partner countries in Russia, including delegations, embassies and missions, or international organisations in Russia enjoying immunities in accordance with international law;

(b)

the provision of electronic communication services by Union telecommunication operators, for the provision of associated facilities and services necessary for the operation, maintenance and security of such electronic communication services, in Russia, in Ukraine, in the Union, between Russia and the Union, and between Ukraine and the Union, and for data centre services in the Union; or

(c)

the sale and transfer by 28 August 2024, or within 6 months from the date of listing in the Annex, whichever is latest, of proprietary rights in a legal person, entity or body established in the Union where those proprietary rights are directly or indirectly owned by a natural or legal person, entity or body listed in the Annex, and after having determined that the proceeds of such sale and transfer remain frozen.

9.   In the absence of a negative decision, a request for information or a notification for additional time from the competent authority within 5 working days of the date of receipt of a request for authorisation under paragraph 7, that authorisation shall be considered granted.

10.   The Member State concerned shall inform the other Member States and the Commission of any authorisations granted under this Article within 4 weeks of the authorisation.

Article 3

1.   The Council, acting by unanimity, upon a proposal from a Member State or from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (the ‘High Representative’), shall decide to establish and amend the list in the Annex.

2.   The Council shall communicate the decision referred to in paragraph 1, including the grounds for the listing, to the natural or legal person, entity or body concerned, either directly, if the address is known and if such communication can be effected, or through the publication of a notice, providing such natural or legal person, entity or body with an opportunity to present observations.

3.   Where observations are submitted, or where substantial new evidence is presented, the Council shall review the decision referred to in paragraph 1 and inform the natural or legal person, entity or body concerned accordingly.

Article 4

1.   The Annex shall include the grounds for listing the natural and legal persons, entities and bodies referred to in Articles 1(1) and 2(1).

2.   The Annex shall contain, where available, the information necessary to identify the natural or legal persons, entities or bodies concerned. With regard to natural persons, such information may include: names and aliases; date and place of birth; nationality; passport and identity card numbers; gender; address, if known; and function or profession. With regard to legal persons, entities or bodies, such information may include: names; place and date of registration; registration number; and place of business.

Article 5

1.   The Council and the High Representative may process personal data in order to carry out their tasks under this Decision, in particular:

(a)

as regards the Council, for preparing and making amendments to the Annex;

(b)

as regards the High Representative, for preparing amendments to the Annex.

2.   The Council and the High Representative may process, where applicable, relevant data relating to criminal offences committed by natural persons listed in the Annex, and to criminal convictions or to security measures concerning such persons, only to the extent that such processing is necessary for the preparation of the Annex.

3.   For the purposes of this Decision, the Council and the High Representative are designated as ‘controllers’ within the meaning of Article 3, point 8, of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council (1), in order to ensure that the natural persons concerned can exercise their rights under that Regulation.

Article 6

1.   The sale, supply, transfer or export of equipment which might be used for internal repression to Russia by nationals of Member States or from the territories of Member States or using their flag vessels or aircraft, shall be prohibited, whether or not originating in their territories.

2.   It shall also be prohibited to:

(a)

provide, directly or indirectly, technical assistance, brokering services or other services related to the items referred to in paragraph 1 or related to the provision, manufacture, maintenance and use of such items, to any natural or legal person, entity or body in, or for use in, Russia.

(b)

provide, directly or indirectly, financing or financial assistance related to the items referred to in paragraph 1, including in particular grants, loans and export credit insurance, for any sale, supply, transfer or export of such items, or for the provision of related technical assistance, brokering services or other services to any natural or legal person, entity or body in, or for use in, Russia.

3.   Paragraphs 1 and 2 shall not apply to the sale, supply, transfer or export of equipment which is intended solely for the protective use of the personnel of the Union and its Member States in Russia, or to the provision of technical assistance, brokering services and other services or of financing and financial assistance related to such equipment.

4.   By way of derogation from paragraphs 1 and 2, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise, under such conditions as they deem appropriate, the sale, supply, transfer or export of equipment which might be used for internal repression, and associated financing and financial and technical assistance, intended solely for humanitarian or protective use, for institution-building programmes of the UN or the Union, or for crisis-management operations of the UN and of the Union or of regional and subregional organisations.

5.   The Union shall take the necessary measures in order to determine the relevant items to be covered by this Article.

Article 7

1.   The sale, supply, transfer or export to any natural or legal person, entity or body in Russia, or for use in Russia, of equipment, technology or software intended primarily for use in the monitoring or interception by, or on behalf of, the Russian authorities of the internet and of telephone communications on mobile or fixed networks, including the provision of any telecommunication or internet monitoring or interception services of any kind, as well as the provision of financial and technical assistance to install, operate or update such equipment, technology or software, by nationals of Member States or from the territories of Member States shall be prohibited.

2.   By way of derogation from paragraph 1, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise the sale, supply, transfer or export of the equipment, technology or software, including the provision of any telecommunication or internet monitoring or interception services of any kind, as well as the related provision of financial and technical assistance, referred to in paragraph 1 if they have reasonable grounds to determine that the equipment, technology or software would not be used for internal repression by the Russian Government, public bodies, corporations or agencies, or any natural or legal person or entity acting on their behalf or at their direction.

The Member State concerned shall inform the other Member States and the Commission of any authorisation granted under this paragraph within 4 weeks of the authorisation.

3.   By way of derogation from paragraph 1, the competent authorities of the Member States may authorise the sale, supply, transfer, export, or provision of the services referred to therein, under such conditions as they deem appropriate, after having determined that this is necessary for:

(a)

the functioning of diplomatic and consular representations of the Union and of the Member States or partner countries in Russia, including delegations, embassies and missions, or international organisations in Russia enjoying immunities in accordance with international law;

(b)

the provision of electronic communication services by Union telecommunication operators necessary for the operation, maintenance and security, including cybersecurity, of electronic communication services, in Russia, in Ukraine, in the Union, between Russia and the Union, and between Ukraine and the Union, and for data centre services in the Union.

The Member State concerned shall inform the other Member States and the Commission of any authorisation granted under this paragraph within 4 weeks of the authorisation.

4.   The Union shall take the necessary measures in order to determine the relevant items to be covered by this Article.

Article 8

1.   No claims in connection with any contract or transaction the performance of which has been affected, directly or indirectly, in whole or in part, by the measures imposed under this Decision, including claims for indemnity or any other claim of this type, such as a claim for compensation or a claim under a guarantee, in particular a claim for extension or payment of a bond, guarantee or indemnity, in particular a financial guarantee or financial indemnity, of whatever form, shall be satisfied, if they are made by:

(a)

designated natural or legal persons, entities or bodies listed in the Annex;

(b)

any natural or legal person, entity or body acting through or on behalf of one of the natural or legal persons, entities or bodies referred to in point (a).

2.   In any proceedings for the enforcement of a claim, the onus of proving that satisfying the claim is not prohibited by paragraph 1 shall be on the natural or legal person, entity or body seeking the enforcement of that claim.

3.   This Article is without prejudice to the right of the natural or legal persons, entities and bodies referred to in paragraph 1 to judicial review of the legality of the non-performance of contractual obligations in accordance with this Decision.

Article 9

It shall be prohibited to participate, knowingly and intentionally, in activities the object or effect of which is to circumvent the prohibitions set out in this Decision.

Article 10

In order to maximise the impact of the measures set out in this Decision, the Union shall encourage third States to adopt restrictive measures similar to those provided for in this Decision.

Article 11

This Decision shall apply until 28 May 2025.

This Decision shall be kept under constant review. It shall be renewed, or amended as appropriate, if the Council deems that its objectives have not been met.

The exceptions referred to in Article 2(7), as regards Article 2(1) and (2), shall be reviewed at regular intervals and at least every 12 months or at the urgent request of any Member State, of the High Representative or of the Commission following a fundamental change in circumstances.

Article 12

This Decision shall enter into force on the date of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

Done at Brussels, 27 May 2024.

For the Council

The President

J. BORRELL FONTELLES


(1)  Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and agencies and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 and Decision No 1247/2002/EC (OJ L 295, 21.11.2018, p. 39).


ANNEX

List of natural and legal persons, entities and bodies referred to in Articles 1(1) and 2(1)

A.   Natural persons

 

Name

Identifying information

Statement of Reasons

Date of listing

1.

Nikolai Pavlovich DUBOVIK

(Николай Павлович ДУБОВИК)

Position: Judge of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Nikolai Pavlovich Dubovik is a judge of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation. In his position, he refused to consider Alexei Navalny’s cassation appeal against the verdict in the ‘slander of a veteran’ trial. As a result, he politically discredited Alexei Navalny before the 2020 constitutional referendum in Russia.

Therefore, Nikolai Pavlovich Dubovik is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

2.

Eduard Borisovich ERDYNIEV

(Эдуард Борисович ЭРДЫНИЕВ)

Position: Judge of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Eduard Borisovich Erdyniev is a judge of the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation. In his position, he refused to consider Alexei Navalny’s cassation appeal against the decision to replace the probation sentence with a fully-fledged sentence. Consequently, Alexei Navalny was pronounced guilty and, years later, was imprisoned in a high-security penal colony in order to prevent him from engaging in political activity.

Therefore, Eduard Borisovich Erdyniev is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

3.

Andrey Vladimirovich FEDOROV

(Андрей Владимирович ФЕДОРОВ/ФЁДОРОВ)

Position: Judge of the Kirovsky District Court, city of Tomsk

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Andrey Vladimirovich Fedorov is a Russian judge working in the Kirovsky District Court, city of Tomsk. In his position, he rejected the complaint about the inaction of the officials of the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation of the Tomsk Oblast regarding the poisoning of Alexei Navalny. His decision resulted in the imprisonment of Alexei Navalny.

Therefore, Andrey Vladimirovich Fedorov is responsible for activities which seriously undermine the rule of law in Russia.

27.5.2024

4.

Ekaterina Vasilevna FEDOTOVA (NAUMOVA)

(Екатерина Васильевна ФЕДОТОВА (НАУМОВА))

Position: Representative of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia for the city of Khimki, Moscow Oblast

DOB: 6.11.1995

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

Ekaterina Vasilevna Fedotova (Naumova) works in the Representation of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia for the city of Khimki, Moscow Oblast. In her position, she took part in the court meeting of 18 January 2021, organised at a police station, and demanded the extension of the illegal detention of Alexei Navalny by 30 days.

Therefore, Ekaterina Vasilevna Fedotova (Naumova) is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

5.

Inna Alexandrovna FESENKO

(Инна Александровна ФЕСЕНКО)

Position: Judge of the Kirovsky District Court, city of Tomsk

DOB: 22.12.1968

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

Inna Alexandrovna Fesenko is a Russian judge working in the Kirovsky District Court, city of Tomsk. In her position, she twice rejected complaints about the inaction of the Tomsk transport police regarding the poisoning of Alexei Navalny. Furthermore, she imposed a ban on certain actions on Ksenia Fadeeva, the former head of Navalny’s organisation headquarters in Tomsk.

Therefore, Inna Alexandrovna Fesenko is responsible for activities which seriously undermine the rule of law in Russia.

27.5.2024

6.

Ekaterina Viktorovna GALYAUTDINOVA

(Екатерина Викторовна ГАЛЯУТДИНОВА)

Position: Judge of the Kirovsky District Court, city of Tomsk

DOB: 1969

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

Ekaterina Viktorovna Galyautdinova is a Russian judge working in the Kirovsky District Court, city of Tomsk. In her position, she twice rejected complaints about the inaction of the Tomsk Transport Police regarding the investigation into the poisoning of Alexei Navalny.

Therefore, Ekaterina Viktorovna Galyautdinova is responsible for activities which seriously undermine the rule of law in Russia.

27.5.2024

7.

Dmitry Evgenevich PANKRATOV

(Дмитрий Евгеньевич ПАНКРАТОВ)

Position: Senior Investigator of the Main Military Investigation Department of the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation, Colonel of Justice

DOB: 29.12.1967

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Dmitry Evgenevich Pankratov is a Senior Investigator of the Main Military Investigation Department of the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation. In his position, he refused to initiate an investigation into the attempted murder of Alexei Navalny following Navalny’s was poisoning with the nerve agent Novichok.

Therefore, Dmitry Evgenevich Pankratov is responsible for activities which seriously undermine the rule of law in Russia.

27.5.2024

8.

Evgeniy Borisovich RASTORGUEV

(Евгений Борисович РАСТОРГУЕВ)

Position: Judge of the 9th Arbitration Court of Appeal, Russia

DOB: 20.8.1970

POB: Vladimir Oblast, former USSR (now Russian Federation)

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Evgeniy Borisovich Rastorguev is a judge of the 9th Arbitration Court of Appeal, Russia. In his position, he upheld the claim of the ‘Druzhba Narodov’ company against Alexei Navalny. Alexei Navalny had claimed, in his investigation, that the company is engaged in a corruption scheme with the Russian National Guard (Rosgvardia).

Therefore, Evgeniy Borisovich Rastorguev is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression, and for activities which seriously undermine the rule of law in Russia.

27.5.2024

9.

Alexander Sergeevich ERMOLENKO

(Александр Сергеевич ЕРМОЛЕНКО)

Position: Head of branch No 15 of the federal governmental institution ‘Criminal Executive Inspectorate of the Directorate of the Federal Penitentiary Service in the City of Moscow’

DOB: 11.11.1993

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Alexander Sergeevich Ermolenko is the Head of branch No 15 of the federal governmental institution ‘Criminal Executive Inspectorate of the Directorate of the Federal Penitentiary Service in the City of Moscow’. In his position, he supported the transformation of Alexei Navalny’s suspended sentence into a custodial sentence during the court hearing in the Yves Rocher case.

Therefore, Alexander Sergeevich Ermolenko is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

10.

Irina Geroldovna KIM

(Ирина Герольдовна КИМ)

Position: Judge of the Kovrov City Court of Vladimir Oblast

DOB: 14.8.1978

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

Irina Geroldovna Kim is a judge of the Kovrov City Court of Vladimir Oblast.

As from 2022, she was directly involved in creating and maintaining torturous conditions for Alexei Navalny through repeatedly rejecting Alexei Navalny’s claims against the IK-6 penal colony regarding his treatment, where he was serving a sentence imposed as a result of politically motivated prosecution.

Therefore, Irina Geroldovna Kim is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia, including torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, arbitrary detentions, and the systematic violation of freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

11.

Kirill Sergeevich NIKIFOROV

(Кирилл Сергеевич НИКИФОРОВ)

Position: Judge of the Kovrov City Court of Vladimir Oblast

DOB: 14.3.1992

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Kirill Sergeevich Nikiforov is a judge of the Kovrov City Court of Vladimir Oblast.

As from 2022, he was directly involved in creating and maintaining torturous conditions for Alexei Navalny through repeatedly rejecting Alexei Navalny’s claims against the IK-6 penal colony regarding his treatment, where he was serving a 12-year sentence imposed as a result of politically motivated prosecution.

Therefore, Kirill Sergeevich Nikiforov is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia, including torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, arbitrary detentions, and the systematic violation of freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

12.

Sergey Vladimirovich BLINOV

(Сергей Владимирович БЛИНОВ)

Position: Judge of the Leninsky district Court of Kirov

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Sergey Vladimirovich Blinov is a judge of the Leninsky District Court of Kirov.

In 2013, he sentenced Alexei Navalny to 5 years and businessman Pyotr Ofitserov to 4 years in prison on embezzlement charges in the politically motivated trial of the ‘Kirovles case’. Additionally, they were fined 500 000 rubles each.

Therefore, Sergey Vladimirovich Blinov is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

13.

Evgeny Vladimirovich BORISOV

(Евгений Владимирович БОРИСОВ)

Position: judge of the Nikulinsky District Court of Moscow

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

Evgeny Vladimirovich Borisov is a judge at the Nikulinsky District Court of Moscow.

In 2015, he accepted the claim of the Kirovles company to recover 16 million rubles from Alexei Navalny and two other defendants in the politically motivated ‘Kirovles case’.

Therefore, Evgeny Vladimirovich Borisov is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

14.

Tatyana Stanislavovna DODONOVA

(Татьяна Станиславовна ДОДОНОВА)

Position: Judge of the Moscow City Court

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

Tatyana Stanislavovna Dodonova is a judge at the Moscow City Court.

In 2014, she recognised the decision to place Alexei Navalny under house arrest as legal in the ‘Yves Rocher’ case. She has systematically been involved in cases against citizens of the Russian Federation who have opposed the political regime in Russia by sentencing arrested persons in connection with the 2019 Moscow Protests.

Therefore, Tatyana Stanislavovna Dodonova is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

15.

Elena Sergeevna ASTAKHOVA

(Елена Сергеевна АСТАХОВА)

Position: Judge in the Golovinsky District Court of Moscow

DOB: 30.3.1978

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

ID NO. 45 01 525454

Taxpayer Personal Identification Number (ИНН):

7703204586

As judge of the Golovinsky District Court of Moscow, Elena Sergeevna Astakhova, sentenced Oleg Orlov, a prominent human rights defender and co-chairman of ‘Memorial’, to two years and six months in a general regime colony on politically motivated charges for speaking up against Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine. Oleg Orlov, aged 70, is one of the most respected and longest-serving human rights defenders in Russia, one of the leaders of the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize-winning organisation Memorial Human Rights Defence Center (HRDC ‘Memorial’), which was liquidated as part of the systematic, wide-scale crackdown on the freedoms of expression, peaceful assembly, and association in Russia. Oleg Orlov was charged with and sentenced for allegedly ‘discrediting’ the Russian army after publishing an opinion piece in French media against Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine.

Therefore, Elena Sergeevna Astakhova is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

16.

Olesya Yurievna VOROBYOVA

(Олеся Юрьевна ВОРОБЬЕВА)

Position: State Prosecutor

DOB: 4.6.1981

As prosecutor in the politically motivated case against the prominent human rights defender Oleg Orlov, Olesya Yurievna Vorobyova asked to sentence Oleg Orlov to 2 years and 11 months in prison, arguing that Orlov’s article against Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine was motivated by ‘ideological hostility and hatred’. Oleg Orlov, aged 70, is one of the most respected and longest-serving human rights defenders in Russia, one of the leaders of the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize-winning organisation Memorial Human Rights Defence Center (HRDC ‘Memorial’), which was liquidated as part of the systematic, wide-scale crackdown on the freedoms of expression, peaceful assembly, and association in Russia. Oleg Orlov was charged with and sentenced for allegedly ‘discrediting’ the Russian army after publishing an opinion piece in French media against Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine.

Therefore, Olesya Yurievna Vorobyova is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

17.

Ilya Andreevich SAVCHENKO

(Илья Андреевич САВЧЕНКО)

Position: Investigator in the Investigative Department of Tver (Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation)

DOB: 18.6.1997

POB: Rtishchevo — Saratov Region, Russian Federation

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

As investigator in the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation, Ilya Andreevich Savchenko was assigned Oleg Orlov’s case and contributed to Orlov’s indictment for having published an opinion piece against Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine. Ilya Andreevich Savchenko established that Orlov had published the article guided by ‘ideological hostility against traditional Russian spiritual, moral and patriotic values’ and of hatred towards the social group ‘Russian militaries’.

Therefore, investigator Ilya Andreevich Savchenko is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

18.

Oksana Vasilyevna DEMYASHEVA

(Оксана Васильевна ДЕМЯШЕВА)

Position: Judge in the Vasileostrovsky District Court of Saint Petersburg

DOB: 10.3.1980

Nationality: Russian

Gender: female

As judge of the Vasileostrovsky District Court of Saint Petersburg, Oksana Vasilyevna Demyasheva sentenced Alexandra Skochilenko, an artist, to seven years in prison on politically-motivated charges for spreading so-called ‘fake news’ about the Russian army. Skochilenko was arrested for replacing price tags at a supermarket with anti-war stickers. She became one of the first people charged under the newly passed criminal law outlawing so-called ‘fake news’ about the Russian army, her trial attracting wide public attention for the unprecedented pressure Skochilenko faced from the jail administration, the judge, and the prosecution.

Therefore, Oksana Vasilyevna Demyasheva is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

19.

Alexander Yurievich GLADYSHEV

(Александр Юрьевич ГЛАДЫШЕВ)

Position: Prosecutor in the Department of State Prosecutors/Saint Petersburg Prosecutor’s Office

DOB: 28.10.1994

Nationality: Russian

Gender: male

As prosecutor of the Prosector’s Office in Saint Petersburg, Alexander Yurievich Gladyshev asked for an eight-year prison sentence for Alexandra Skochilenko, an artist, on politically motivated charges of spreading ‘fake news’ about the army, after she was arrested for replacing price tags at a supermarket with anti-war stickers. Skochilenko became one of the first persons charged under the newly passed criminal law outlawing so-called ‘fake news’ about the Russian army, her trial attracting wide public attention for the unprecedented pressure Skochilenko faced from the jail administration, the judge, and the prosecution.

Therefore, Alexander Yurievich Gladyshev is responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia by violating freedom of opinion and expression.

27.5.2024

B.   Legal persons, entities and bodies

 

Name

Identifying information

Statement of Reasons

Date of listing

1.

FEDERAL PENITENTIARY SERVICE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

(FSIN)

ФЕДЕРАЛЬНАЯ СЛУЖБА ИСПОЛНЕНИЯ НАКАЗАНИЙ

(ФСИН) (RU)

Address: Zhitnaya Street 14 Yakimanka District, Central Administrative Okrug, Moscow

Website: http://www.fsin.su/eng

The Federal Penitentiary Service of the Russian Federation (FSIN) is a federal agency under the supervision of the Ministry of Justice of Russia. FSIN is the federal authority for the detention of suspected and convicted persons, the security and maintenance of prisons in Russia, the transport of prisoners, and rehabilitation programmes.

As such, FSIN is the central authority managing the Russian prison system, known for its widespread and systematic abuses against, and ill-treatment of, political prisoners in Russia. As a federal agency, FSIN is responsible for the penal colonies where Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny was held on politically motivated charges and ultimately died on 16 February 2024. During his imprisonment, Alexei Navalny suffered abuses, including through solitary confinement in a punishment cell and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, leading to the severe deterioration of his health. Other political prisoners held in the Russian prison system under similarly harsh conditions of detention, are subjected to abuse and ill-treatment, which is meant to physically and psychologically break them.

FSIN is therefore responsible for serious human rights violations in Russia, including torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

27.5.2024


ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/dec/2024/1484/oj

ISSN 1977-0677 (electronic edition)


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