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Document C:2018:456:FULL

Official Journal of the European Union, C 456, 18 December 2018


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ISSN 1977-091X

Official Journal

of the European Union

C 456

European flag  

English edition

Information and Notices

Volume 61
18 December 2018


Contents

page

 

I   Resolutions, recommendations and opinions

 

RESOLUTIONS

 

Council

2018/C 456/01

Resolution of the Council of the European Union and the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States meeting within the Council on a framework for European cooperation in the youth field: The European Union Youth Strategy 2019-2027

1


 

II   Information

 

INFORMATION FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

 

European Commission

2018/C 456/02

Withdrawal of notification of a concentration (Case M.9094 — Amcor/Bemis) ( 1 )

23


 

IV   Notices

 

NOTICES FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

 

Council

2018/C 456/03

Notice for the attention of certain persons and entities subject to the restrictive measures provided for in Council Decision 2014/145/CFSP and Council Regulation (EU) No 269/2014 concerning restrictive measures in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine

24

2018/C 456/04

Notice for the attention of the persons to whom restrictive measures provided for in Council Decision 2011/172/CFSP and in Council Regulation (EU) No 270/2011 concerning restrictive measures in view of the situation in Egypt apply

25

 

European Commission

2018/C 456/05

Euro exchange rates

26

2018/C 456/06

Communication from the Commission concerning the prolongation of the specific regime for operating aid for airports with up to 700000 passengers per annum provided for in the Guidelines on State aid to airports and airlines

27

 

Court of Auditors

2018/C 456/07

Special Report No 34/2018 — Office accommodation of EU institutions — Some good management practices but also various weaknesses

29


 


 

(1)   Text with EEA relevance.

EN

 


I Resolutions, recommendations and opinions

RESOLUTIONS

Council

18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/1


Resolution of the Council of the European Union and the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States meeting within the Council on a framework for European cooperation in the youth field:

The European Union Youth Strategy 2019-2027

(2018/C 456/01)

THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION AND THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE GOVERNMENTS OF THE MEMBER STATES MEETING WITHIN THE COUNCIL,

ACKNOWLEDGING the EU youth policy cooperation up to 2019. The EU has been running a dedicated EU Youth Policy cooperation based on the principles of active participation and equal access to opportunities since 2002 (1), in synergy with other policies targeting young people, such as education, training and employment. The cooperation prompted policy and legislative changes in the Member States and contributed to capacity-building of youth organisations.

RECALLING that since the objective of this Resolution is to set up an EU Youth Strategy able to address the challenges that young people are facing all over Europe, provide a common and coherent EU response to them, and complement the efforts and initiatives by Member States in this regard, such objective can be better achieved at EU level than by the Member States alone. The Council may therefore adopt initiatives, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union, in order to reach such objective. In accordance with the principle of proportionality as set out in that Article, this Resolution does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve that objective.

RECOGNISE that

1.   Young people have a specific role in society and face specific challenges

Young people are keen to take control of their lives and engage with and support others. When taking control, they experience several typical transitions in their personal life and environment, from education to work, living on their own, partnerships or starting a family life. Many face uncertainties about their future, as a result of globalisation and climate change, technological change, demographic and socioeconomic trends, populism, discrimination, social exclusion and fake news with yet unknown effects on jobs, skills or the way our democracies work.

Special attention should be given to youth risking marginalisation based on potential sources of discrimination, such as their ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, disability, religion, belief or political opinion.

Socioeconomic exclusion and democratic exclusion go hand in hand (2). Youth struggling with disadvantages are generally less active citizens and have less trust in institutions. Europe cannot afford wasted talent, social exclusion or disengagement among its youth. Young people should not only be architects of their own lives, but also contribute to positive change in society. For young people to reap the full benefits of EU actions, these need to reflect their aspirations, creativity and talents, and respond to their needs. In turn, young people enrich the EU's ambitions: according to the EU Youth Report (3) this generation is the best educated ever and especially skilled in using Information and Communication Technologies and social media.

2.   A European Union Youth Strategy 2019-2027 is needed

Building on the experiences and decisions of the cooperation in the youth field in the past years (4), the European Union Youth Strategy 2019-2027 aims at tackling existing and upcoming challenges young people are facing all over Europe. The EU Youth Strategy provides a framework of objectives, principles, priorities, core areas and measures for youth policy cooperation for all relevant stakeholders with due regard for their respective competences and the principle of subsidiarity.

Relevant stakeholders are, amongst others, the EU Member States, the relevant European Union institutions and other international organisations, such as the Council of Europe, local and regional authorities, youth councils, youth organisations, organisations working with young people, youth workers, youth researchers and civil society actors as well as structures of the programmes Erasmus+ and the European Solidarity Corps and their successor programmes.

By involving and empowering all young people, youth policy can contribute to successfully meeting the vision of a continent where young people can seize opportunities and relate to European values.

3.   The European Youth Goals provide a vision for Europe

In the course of the 6th cycle of the Structured Dialogue under the title ‘Youth in Europe: What's next?’ decision-makers, young people and researchers jointly collected topics that were relevant for young people through an EU-wide consultation and clustered them in 11 areas. As a result of this participatory process which involved young people from all over Europe, the 11 European Youth Goals were developed. They reflect the views of European youth and represent the vision of those active in the Structured Dialogue.

They are a testimony to the eagerness of many young Europeans to participate in defining the direction in which European cooperation in the youth field should go. The EU Youth Strategy should contribute to realising this vision of young people by mobilising EU-level policy instruments as well as actions at national, regional and local level by all stakeholders.

As an unedited voice from the participants, the European Youth Goals are presented in their full length in Annex 3 to serve — with due respect for the principle of subsidiarity, national competence and the freedom of association — as inspiration and provide an orientation for the EU, its Member States and their relevant stakeholders and authorities.

WELCOME

The Commission Communication ‘Engaging, Connecting and Empowering young people: a new EU Youth Strategy’ of 22 May 2018 (5).

ACCORDINGLY AGREE on

1.   Overall objectives

EU youth cooperation shall make the most of youth policy's potential. It fosters youth participation in democratic life, in line with Article 165 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU. It also supports social and civic engagement and aims to ensure that all young people have the necessary resources to take part in society.

In the coming years, the strategy strives to:

Enable young people to be architects of their own lives, support their personal development and growth to autonomy, build their resilience and equip them with life skills to cope with a changing world,

Encourage and equip young people with the necessary resources to become active citizens, agents of solidarity and positive change inspired by EU values and a European identity,

Improve policy decisions with regard to their impact on young people across all sectors, notably employment, education, health and social inclusion,

Contribute to the eradication of youth poverty and all forms of discrimination and promote social inclusion of young people.

2.   Guiding principles

European Youth Policy and all actions undertaken within the European Union Youth Strategy 2019-2027 should be firmly anchored in the international system of human rights. The following principles should be applied in all policies and activities concerning young people:

A.

Equality and non-discrimination: combating all forms of discrimination and promoting gender equality, recognising that young people are at risk of facing multiple forms of discrimination, including age-based discrimination, and observing the principles recognised, inter alia, in Articles 21 and 23 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

B.

Inclusion: acknowledging that young people are not a homogenous group, and thus have diverse needs, backgrounds, life situations and interests, the EU Youth Strategy should promote activities and policies that are inclusive for all young people, especially those with fewer opportunities and/or those whose voices may be overlooked.

C.

Participation: recognising that all young people are a resource to society, all policies and activities concerning young people should uphold young people's right to participate in the development, implementation and follow-up of policies affecting them by means of meaningful participation of young people and youth organisations. In this context, policies should be built in recognition of the changes brought about by digital communication affecting democratic and civic participation.

D.

Global, European, national, regional and local dimension: in order to ensure sustainable impact on young people, it is important that EU youth policy be implemented with the interlinkages with regional and local levels in mind and that activities are conducted to support youth policies at grass-roots level. At the same time, young people's voices should be taken into account whenever global issues are addressed.

E.

Dual approach: Policies that strive to improve the lives of young people can never be limited to the field of youth itself. Therefore the dual approach agreed upon in the previous cooperation framework 2010-2018 is still indispensable as it aims to tackle youth-relevant issues on the one hand by mainstreaming initiatives across policy areas and on the other hand by specific initiatives in the youth sector.

FURTHER AGREE on

1.   Working on effective, focused and joined-up implementation within and across sectors

The lives of young people are shaped by policies rooted in manifold policy areas and on different levels of implementation. Hence, only by mainstreaming youth as a priority amongst different policy areas it can be ensured that the specific needs or effects for young people in envisaged policies or programs are taken into account. To lead by example, at EU level a cross-sectoral approach should be further pursued as a fundamental basis. Furthermore, youth mainstreaming can only be effective when it also guarantees a say for young people in all possible policy areas that affect them.

Cross-sectoral cooperation should be reinforced at all levels of decision-making striving for synergies, complementarity between actions, and including greater youth involvement.

2.   Tackling core areas of the youth sector: Engage. Connect. Empower.

a.   Engage

Providing pathways of engagement for young people in their daily lives but also in democratic life is vital for a functioning democracy and for society at large. Focussing on the participation of young people is particularly important, since any decision taken today will have the longest impact on the current generation of young people. Moreover, the age group of young people is less represented in political bodies and has fewer opportunities to influence and take part in decision-making processes than other age groups. The EU Youth Strategy aims towards a meaningful civic, economic, social, cultural and political participation of young people.

Therefore, engaging young people has to be a cornerstone of the future EU youth policy cooperation. This also means that young people must have a say in the development, implementation and evaluation of policies that concern them, such as the EU Youth Strategy as well as national youth strategies. To be as inclusive as possible and adapt to existing and upcoming challenges, exploring new and alternative forms of participation is essential.

INVITE MEMBER STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION, WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS OF COMPETENCE, TO:

Encourage and promote inclusive democratic participation of all young people in society and democratic processes,

Actively engage young people, youth organisations and other organisers of youth work in the development, implementation and evaluation of policies affecting the lives of young people on local, regional, national and European level,

Support the establishment and development of youth representations at local, regional and national level, recognising young people's right to participate and self-organise, the recognition of representative youth structures and their inclusion in the work of local, regional, national and European authorities,

Support and convey the EU Youth Dialogue (6) in order to include diverse voices of young people in decision-making processes on all levels and foster the development of citizenship competencies, through citizenship education and learning strategies,

Support and develop opportunities for ‘learning to participate’, raising interest in participatory actions and helping young people to prepare for participation,

Explore and promote the use of innovative and alternative forms of democratic participation, e.g. digital democracy tools and facilitate access in order to support youth participation in democratic life and engage young people in an inclusive way, whilst being aware that some young people do not have access to the internet and digital technologies, or the skills to use them.

b.   Connect

Young people in Europe are getting more and more connected. Connections, relations and exchange of experience are a pivotal asset for solidarity and the future development of the European Union. This connection is best fostered through different forms of mobility.

Therefore, opportunities for young people to experience exchanges, cooperation, cultural and civic action in a European context need to be accessible for all young people. This allows them to develop and strengthen personal, social and civic competencies, develop critical thinking and creativity, enhance employability and become active European citizens. Youth exchanges and projects within Erasmus+, the European Solidarity Corps and their successor programmes are sources for intercultural learning and empowerment especially for young people with fewer opportunities.

The EU youth cooperation should underpin these opportunities for young people. It should benefit from EU programmes such as Erasmus+ and the European Solidarity Corps and their successor programmes, in order to enhance knowledge about young people and their aspirations, and to strengthen policy cooperation and community building.

The EU Youth Strategy should also foster the connectedness of young people in the EU and candidate countries, Eastern-Partnership and Western Balkan partners (7), as well as with other third countries with whom the EU has association or cooperation agreements, as appropriate, with the help of the EU through relevant EU funding programmes.

INVITE MEMBER STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION, WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS OF COMPETENCE, TO:

Enable access for all young people, as well as for youth workers, to cross-border mobility opportunities, including volunteering in the civil society sector, by eliminating obstacles and implementing support measures with special attention to young people with fewer opportunities,

Encourage young people's engagement in solidarity, promoting support schemes and seek complementarity and synergies between EU funding instruments and national, regional and local schemes,

Actively engage young people and youth organisations in the design, implementation and evaluation of relevant EU funding programmes,

Share best practices and further work on effective systems for validation and recognition of skills and competencies gained through non-formal and informal learning, including solidarity and volunteering activities, continuing the implementation of the Council Recommendation of 2012 on the validation of non-formal and informal learning.

c.   Empower

Empowerment of young people means encouraging them to take charge of their own lives. This requires the necessary resources, tools and an environment that is willing to pay proper attention to the voice of young people. Today, young people across Europe are facing diverse challenges, such as difficulties in accessing their social rights, social exclusion and discrimination, as well as threats arising from fake news and propaganda.

In order to address these challenges and therefore allow for the true empowerment of youth, it is necessary to work collaboratively on policies that tackle the specific situation of young people and consequently improve the lives of young people in the EU.

In this context, youth work in all its forms can serve as a catalyst for empowerment: Youth work brings unique benefits to young people in their transition to adulthood (8), providing a safe environment for them to gain self-confidence, and learn in a non-formal way. Youth work is known for equipping youth with key personal, professional and entrepreneurial competences and skills such as teamwork, leadership, intercultural competences, project management, problem solving and critical thinking. In some cases, youth work is the bridge into education, training or work, thus preventing exclusion.

To reap these benefits, there is a greater need for recognition of non-formal and informal learning through youth work, especially beneficial to those with little formal qualifications, as a way to improve employability. Recognition can be improved by a more systematic use of quality tools.

INVITE MEMBER STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION, WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS OF COMPETENCE, TO:

Develop and implement a European Youth Work Agenda for quality, innovation and recognition of youth work. In order to unleash the full potential, it is necessary to integrate the expertise of youth representations, youth organisations, youth workers and researchers. Further synergies with the work carried out by the Council of Europe in this area should be encouraged,

Support quality youth work development on local, regional, national and European level, including policy development in the field, training for youth workers, the establishment of legal frameworks and sufficient allocation of resources,

Support youth work activities on all levels, including grassroots, and recognise youth organisations as providers of competences development and social inclusion through youth work and non-formal education activities, while respecting national, regional and local activities in this field,

Create and further develop, when and where possible, easily accessible youth contact points that deliver a wide range of services and/or provide information, including financial guidance, guidance and support on career, health and relationships and educational, cultural and employment opportunities.

ACCORDINGLY INVITE MEMBER STATES AND THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION, WITHIN THEIR RESPECTIVE FIELDS OF COMPETENCE, TO:

3.   Cooperate on the Basis of Instruments and Governance

To effectively implement the EU Youth Strategy across the EU and in the Member States, concrete instruments are needed. The following measures will be used to achieve the objectives of the EU Youth Strategy where appropriate on a local, regional, national, European and global level:

a.

Evidence-based youth policy-making and knowledge building: EU Youth Policy should be evidence-based and anchored in the real needs and situations of young people. That requires continuous research, knowledge development and outreach to young people and youth organisations. The collection of disaggregated data on young people is of particular importance to foster understanding of the needs of different groups of young people, particularly those with fewer opportunities. Evidence based policy-making should be carried out with the support of the Youth Wiki, youth research networks, cooperation with international organisations such as the Council of Europe, the OECD and other bodies, including youth organisations.

b.

Mutual learning and dissemination: Mutual learning between Member States, the European Commission and relevant stakeholders should be a tool for the advancement of youth policy with regard to both core and cross-sectoral areas. Expert groups will continue to develop policy guidance, practical tools and share good practices; this strategy will offer new tools for mutual learning, such as peer reviews and peer counselling, high-level forums, analysis and studies, following the priorities of the EU Youth Strategy at large, and within the triennial Work Plans. It will pursue a more systematic approach to quality youth information, outreach and dissemination, building on its existing networks.

c.

Participatory governance: In order to acknowledge young people as experts of their own lives, it is crucial to ensure that young people and their representative organisations are involved in the different phases of implementation of the EU Youth Strategy. Participation increases visibility for young people and their concerns, but it also raises the visibility of decision-makers in youth policy in the eyes of young people. Participation also aims at increasing legitimacy and acknowledgement of youth policies. In order to build a basis for a regular civic dialogue, give stakeholders a greater role in coordinating the implementation of the strategy, offer opportunities to exchange information on activities and results, an EU Youth Strategy Platform will aim to facilitate participatory governance and coordination of the implementation of the Strategy. The Commission is invited to organise dedicated meetings to bring together, as appropriate, representatives of EU institutions, Member States, National Agencies of Erasmus+ and the European Solidarity Corps, youth organisations and other relevant stakeholders as well as local and regional authorities.

d.

Mobilising EU programmes and funds: The strategy will promote effective use of EU programmes and funds, such as Erasmus+, the European Solidarity Corps, European Structural and Investment Funds, Horizon 2020, including the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, Creative Europe, and their successors. Member States are invited to explore synergies between funding sources at EU, national, regional and local levels.

e.

Monitoring of EU funding: Transparency on EU action for young people, should include monitoring of EU spending on youth, using existing mechanisms as appropriate.

f.

Communicating the EU Youth Strategy: Keeping in mind the different stakeholders involved in policy-making for young people, it is important to communicate the purpose and the content of the EU Youth Strategy in a comprehensive way and youth-friendly language. The EU Youth Strategy together with the European Youth Goals can provide orientation for people closely involved in shaping youth policy as well as to actors outside of that field, creating a new and positive narrative on EU youth policy and Youth Work in Europe.

g.

Future National Activities Planner (9): The Future National Activities Planner (FNAP) intend to allow Member States on a voluntary basis to share their priorities in line with the EU Youth Strategy. Their aim is to increase transparency in the implementation of youth policies at regional, national and EU level. This should help identify appropriate partners for mutual learning activities, responding to individual needs of Member States. In order to avoid additional administrative burden, the FNAPs should build on existing national youth policy frameworks/national youth strategies.

h.

EU Youth Dialogue (10): Building on the achievements of the Structured Dialogue with young people and youth organisations, a new EU Youth Dialogue will be established, with the necessary tools, with the aim of including more decision-makers and young people, especially those not-listened-to and/or with fewer opportunities in decision-making processes and the implementation of the EU Youth Strategy, fostering their engagement and their political participation with the EU and society at large. In addition, a more regular exchange between EU Youth Dialogue National Working Groups and the European Commission should be facilitated.

i.

The EU Youth Coordinator: The Council welcomes the intention to establish an EU Youth Coordinator within the European Commission, with the objective of enhancing cross-sectoral cooperation, as well as knowledge development and exchange on youth issues within the European Commission services. The EU Youth Coordinator should work hand in hand with various stakeholders to ensure a coherent communication towards young people.

j.

Youth Information and Support: with the adequate provision of quality youth information services and platforms at all levels, including the European Youth Portal, and with the support of European-wide organisations, young people's equal access to quality information on their rights, opportunities, youth services and EU programmes for young people can be promoted;

k.

EU Work Plans for Youth: The EU Youth Strategy will be following triennial working periods which spans two Presidency Trios. The priorities and actions for the respective working periods will be presented in the EU Work Plans for Youth. The Council will set these EU Work Plans together with the Commission, beginning with a work plan for 2019-2021 (11). These plans should draw on the guiding principles and priorities of this Strategy, addressing youth issues in other Council configurations and their preparatory bodies in relevant policy areas.

l.

Monitoring, reporting, evaluation: In order to review and facilitate the progress of policy coordination, periodic monitoring of the progress achieved should be conducted. Good practices and their conditions for transferability should be identified to facilitate mutual learning between Member States. The Commission will report on the implementation of the EU Youth Strategy every three years, based, inter alia, on information provided by Member States and the Youth Wiki. The Youth Wiki will continue to provide information on the development of national youth policies. At EU level, youth organisations and other relevant stakeholders will be closely involved in monitoring progress through the EU Strategy Platform. The Dashboard of EU Youth Indicators can be used to monitor the overall situation of young people in Member States. The Member States and the European Commission are invited to review the Indicators' Dashboard in the first year after adoption of the EU Youth Strategy. Quantitative and qualitative indicators and benchmarks could be established, tailored to the needs of Member States and sectors involved, as a means for comparing best practices and monitoring the implementation of the strategy. A policy review of EU funded research projects should be conducted from 2019 on to extract relevant findings for the youth policy area.

m.

Mid-term Review: The Council shall carry out a mid-term review of the EUYS on the basis of an evaluation report to be submitted by the Commission by 31 December 2023. It shall review as appropriate this Resolution in the year 2024, in order to adjust it to possible new developments and needs.


(1)  Council Resolution on a renewed framework in the youth field (2010-2018).

Resolution of the Council and of the representatives of the governments regarding the framework of European cooperation in the youth field (27 June 2002).

(2)  Eurofound — section on NEETs: https://www.eurofound.europa.eu/topic/NEETs

(3)  Doc. 9264/18 ADD 2 — SWD(2018) 169 final part 1-7.

(4)  Commission Communication on Investing in Europe's Youth (COM(2016)940), Council Conclusions on strategic perspectives for European cooperation in the youth field post-2018, May 2017.

(5)  Doc. 9264/18 + ADD 1 to ADD 8 — COM(2018) 269 final.

(6)  For further details see Annex 1 on the EU Youth Dialogue.

(7)  https://ec.europa.eu/neighbourhood-enlargement/policy/eu-and-western-balkans_en

(8)  Expert group on the ‘contribution of youth work and non-formal and informal learning to address the challenges young people are facing, in particular the transition from education to employment’. http://ec.europa.eu/assets/eac/youth/library/reports/contribution-youth-work-summary_en.pdf

(9)  For further details see Annex 2 on the Future National Activities Planners.

(10)  For further details see Annex 1 on the EU Youth Dialogue.

(11)  For further details see Annex 4 on the EU Work Plan for Youth 2019-2021.


ANNEX 1

on EU Youth Dialogue

1.   Introduction

‘EU Youth Dialogue’ means the dialogue with young people and youth organisations involving policy and decision makers, as well as experts, researchers and other relevant civil society actors, as appropriate. It serves as a forum for continuous joint reflection and consultation on the priorities, implementation and follow-up of European cooperation in the field of youth (1).

The EU Youth Dialogue is the evolution of the Structured Dialogue process that has been established by the resolution on a renewed cooperation framework in the youth field (2010-2018) and further developed in the following years, accordingly to the results of continuous monitoring and evaluation (2).

The Council resolution on the future development of the Structured Dialogue adopted in May 2017 invited the Member States and the Commission ‘to undertake a review of the Structured Dialogue process and its objectives for the European Cooperation in the Youth Field Post 2018 and consider innovative and effective ways of promoting meaningful and constructive dialogue and engagement with young people from diverse background, youth organisations, youth researchers and policy makers including stakeholders from other relevant sectors.’ (3)

2.   Objectives of the EU Youth Dialogue

The EU Youth Dialogue should contribute to the overall objectives and follow the guiding principles of the EU Youth Strategy as outlined in the Resolution above.

The specific objectives of the EU Youth Dialogue are to:

(a)

encourage the participation of young people in democratic life in Europe in line with Article 165 TFEU;

(b)

promote equal participation between young women and men;

(c)

include diverse voices and to ensure openness to all young people to contribute to policy-shaping;

(d)

bring about positive change in youth policy at local, regional, national and European level;

(e)

strengthen young people's' citizenship competencies and sense of belonging to the society and the European Union.

3.   Implementation of the EU Youth Dialogue

The EU Youth Dialogue should preferably follow work-cycles of 18 months with one thematic priority per cycle that is closely linked to the priorities of the EU Youth Strategy and the European Youth Goals where appropriate.

Every cycle should build on the learnings of the previous one. Continuous follow-up is vital to monitor quality outcomes and the impact in general of the whole process. Procedures for measuring impact, qualitative and/or quantitative, should be conducted throughout all process phases by all partners involved at the appropriate level.

Following the above mentioned objectives, the Youth Dialogue should build on approaches towards participation on different stages:

(a)

Information on participation possibilities as well as on the overall topic, provided from local to European levels;

(b)

Consultation, including online and offline interaction methods as well as evidence-based research results;

(c)

Direct dialogue between decision-makers and young people, building on best practices in methodological approaches developed in the Structured Dialogue so far, as well as on continuous innovation in this respect;

(d)

Continuous partnership in the governance of the process at national and European level, including partnerships with relevant sectors according to the topic of the cycle where appropriate.

4.   Governance of the EU Youth Dialogue

The governance of the EU Youth Dialogue should further build on the experience from the past, while aiming at a clearer and leaner process.

To support the implementation and governance of EU Youth Dialogue, diverse partnerships on different levels can be beneficial, for example with Youth Councils, youth organisations and other youth field stakeholders as well as partners from other sectors.

Member States are encouraged to enable youth participation in all phases of implementation of the EU Youth Dialogue by giving, inter alia, a leading role in the National Working Group to the National Youth Council.


(1)  Doc. 11865/18, Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing ‘Erasmus’: the Union programme education, training, youth and sport and repealing Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

(2)  Doc. 9264/18 ADD 1 Commission Staff working document on Results of the open method of coordination in the youth field 2010-2018 Accompanying the Commission communication on Engaging, Connecting and Empowering young people: a new EU Youth Strategy.

(3)  Doc. 9632/17 Council Resolution on the Structured Dialogue and the future development of the dialogue with young people in the context of policies for European cooperation in the youth field, post-2018.


ANNEX 2

on Future National Activities Planner

In order to increase transparency in the implementation of youth policies at regional, national and EU level, Future National Activities Planners (FNAPs) intend to allow Member States on a voluntary basis to share their priorities in line with the EU Youth Strategy.

Youth policies in Member States are among the most important instruments for the implementation of the EU Youth Strategy. They are often consolidated in a national youth strategy or an equivalent youth policy planning document. The content of such national youth strategies can be highly relevant for other Member States in allowing them to establish synergies, facilitate peer learning and help to identify and cluster different interests and specific needs of Member States in youth policy development.

The aim of collecting future national priorities in the field of youth is to:

create a knowledge base to spark potential bilateral or multilateral projects and activities in the field of youth policy-making,

allow Member States to engage strategically with other Member States with regard to national needs and future strategies,

identify areas for mutual learning between Member States,

give national and regional activities a role on the European stage.

In their FNAPs, Member States could:

name responsible actors,

outline the translation of the European priorities into the national context, connecting them to concrete actions,

set out how the actions in the plans connect to national and EU funding programmes for youth, such as Erasmus+, the European Solidarity Corps, the Youth Guarantee and their successor programmes under the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027.

The development of FNAPs should ideally follow the principle of youth participation in policy-making. Involvement of National Agencies for Erasmus+ and the European Solidarity Corps in this process could also be encouraged, alongside cooperation with different cross-sectoral actors.

In order to maximise the potential of mutual learning and synergies, the FNAPs should be made publicly available.


ANNEX 3

on European Youth Goals

The European Youth Goals (1) are the outcome of the 6th cycle of the Structure Dialogue with young people, decision-makers, researchers and other stakeholders that took place under the title ‘Youth in Europe: What’s next?’. The aim of this cycle was to collect voices of young people and contribute together to creating the EU Youth Strategy 2019-2027.

The European Youth Goals present a vision for a Europe that enables young people to realise their full potential. They identify cross-sectoral areas that affect young people’s lives and point out which challenges need to be tackled.

The first phase of the 6th cycle of the Structured Dialogue focused on blue-sky-thinking and defining a common understanding on the topic of the cycle. Young people, together with decision-makers, identified relevant topics for policy-making in the youth field, which served the involved researchers as a basis for designing a Europe-wide consultation. In the following consultation phase, young people from all over Europe from a diverse range of backgrounds were involved through focus groups, surveys and other methods. Building on the results of this consultation, youth delegates and decisions-makers formulated together the 11 European Youth Goals listed below, which were widely welcomed by Ministers in the following EU Youth Council policy debate. The last phase of the cycle focused on planning concrete actions and exploring ways on how to implement the European Youth Goals.

Within their respective competences Member States and the European Commission are invited to draw inspiration from the European Youth Goals among others and include this vision wherever suitable in all related policies and agendas.

With due regard to the subsidiarity, the European Youth Goals should be treated in accordance with the national and Union legislation and national circumstances. The European Youth Goals do not represent legally binding goals.

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#1 CONNECTING EU WITH Youth

Background: An increasing number of young people lack trust in the EU, encounter difficulties in understanding its principles, values, and functioning. Democratic deficits in EU processes have also been identified as one of the reasons for rising Euroscepticism among young people.

Goal: Foster the sense of youth belonging to the European project and build a bridge between the EU and young people to regain trust and increase participation.

Targets

Guarantee meaningful youth involvement and dialogue in all stages of EU decision making by improving existing participatory mechanisms and creating new ones.

Ensure equal access to quality impartial and youth-friendly information about how the EU works, how to engage in it and what opportunities it offers.

Introduce and increase education about Europe and the EU in formal and non-formal settings.

Guarantee fair representation of all Member States in political and administrative EU bodies, in line with the principle of equal citizenship.

Increase the budget and the impact of the EU youth programmes.

Build young people’s trust in the EU project by addressing the democratic deficit, lack of transparency and visibility.

Institutionalise the assessment of youth-friendliness, impact and effect of EU policies.

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#2 EQUALITY OF ALL GENDERS  (2)

Background: Gender-based discrimination still affects many young people, especially young women. Equal opportunities and access to rights need to be ensured for young people of all genders including non-binary and LGBTQI+  (3) young people.

Goal: Ensure equality of all genders and gender-sensitive approaches in all areas of life of a young person.

Targets

Tackle discrimination and ensure equal rights for all genders in cultural, political and socioeconomical life.

Achieve universal awareness of gender-based inequality and discrimination, particularly in the media.

End gender-based violence by addressing and tackling it effectively in all its forms.

Eliminate stereotypical gender roles and embrace diverse gender identities in education systems, family life, the workplace, and other areas of life.

End gender-based structural discrimination in the labour market and ensure equal rights, access and opportunities.

Ensure equal pay for equal work and the equal sharing of the responsibilities of care work.

Ensure equal access to formal and non-formal education, and that the design of education systems follows gender-sensitive approaches.

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#3 INCLUSIVE SOCIETIES

Background: One third of young people in Europe are at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Many do not have access to their social rights. Many continue to face multiple discrimination, experience prejudice and hate crimes. New migratory phenomena brought several social and inclusion challenges. Therefore, it is crucial to work towards the fulfilment of the rights of all young people in Europe, including the most marginalised and excluded.

Goal: Enable and ensure the inclusion of all young people in society.

Targets

Provide legal protection and enforce international legal instruments to fight against all kinds of discrimination and hate speech, recognising that young people are subjected to multiple forms of discrimination.

Strengthen outreach of information to marginalised young people, to ensure they are aware of spaces, opportunities and experiences available to them.

Ensure that all marginalised young people have equal access to formal and non-formal learning environments, addressing all the dimensions of inclusion.

Strengthen the capacities of educators to work with marginalised young people.

Provide more spaces, opportunities, resources and programmes to foster dialogue and social cohesion, and combat discrimination and segregation.

Strengthen social support by implementing the right to a living wage, fair work condition, universal access to quality health care, and ensure specific measures for marginalised young people.

Ensure that marginalised young people are participating in all decision-making processes and are key players, particularly in processes concerning their own rights, wellbeing and interests.

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#4 INFORMATION AND CONSTRUCTIVE DIALOGUE

Background: Young people experience difficulties to verify the accuracy and reliability of information. They need to be more adequately equipped to navigate the media landscape and to participate in constructive dialogue.

Goal: Ensure young people have better access to reliable information, support their ability to evaluate information critically and engage in participatory and constructive dialogue.

Targets

Empower young people to be critical and responsible users and producers of information.

Ensure young people have the ability to recognise and report repeatedly misleading news and verify the accuracy of news sources used.

Ensure young people have the ability to recognise and report hate speech and discrimination online and offline.

Ensure young people can engage in respectful, tolerant and non-violent dialogue, online and offline.

Ensure easy access to understandable youth-friendly information that follows codes of ethics and quality standards

Ensure parents and carers, and all those involved with educating and training young people are equipped with media and digital literacy skills and that they are reliable information sources for young people.

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#5 MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Background: A significant and increasing number of young people across Europe are expressing their concern at the prevalence of mental health issues such as high stress, anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses amongst their peers. Young people cite the immense societal pressures they face today, and express a need for better youth mental health provision.

Goal: Achieve better mental wellbeing and end stigmatisation of mental health issues, thus promoting social inclusion of all young people.

Targets

Encourage the development of self-awareness and less competitive mindsets by fostering appreciation for individual skills and strengths.

Safeguard the rights to work and to study of people with mental health issues both during and after illness to ensure their ability to pursue their own ambitions.

Develop an inclusive intersectional approach to mental health provision for all, especially marginalised groups.

Provide all professionals working with young people as well as family and friends with quality mental health first aid training.

Provide inclusive, respectful and well-funded treatment by incorporating high quality mental health provision across all medical institutions.

Focus on prevention measures that ensure young people are equipped with the knowledge and the skills required for better mental wellbeing.

Fight stigma about mental health issues by developing awareness programmes.

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#6 MOVING RURAL YOUTH FORWARD

Background: Despite the EU-wide commitment to rural development and given the fact that by 2015 almost one third of the EU population were living in rural areas, prevailing differences exist between living in urban and in rural areas  (4) . Therefore, it is important to ensure equality for young people in urban and rural settings.

Goal: Create conditions which enable young people to fulfil their potential in rural areas.

Targets

Ensure appropriate infrastructure in rural areas in order to provide equitable delivery of public services, data connectivity and housing opportunities for young people.

Ensure that sustainable, high quality jobs, accessible to young people are created in rural areas.

Ensure the decentralisation of different activities by, for and with young people in order to support their inclusion and to benefit local communities.

Ensure that young people in rural areas are actively participating in decision-making processes.

Ensure equal access to high quality education for young people in rural areas.

Establish a positive image of rural areas.

Ensure the protection of rural traditions.

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#7 QUALITY EMPLOYMENT FOR ALL

Background: Young people are suffering from high youth unemployment, precarious and exploitative working conditions as well as discrimination in the labour market and the workplace. The lack of information and suitable skills for future employment are preventing young people to be fully integrated in the labour market. Thus measures need to be taken in order to ensure quality employment for all.

Goal: Guarantee an accessible labour market with opportunities that lead to quality jobs for all young people.

Targets

Create quality jobs which guarantee fair working conditions, working rights and the right of living wage for all young people.

Safeguard social protection and healthcare for all young workers.

Guarantee fair treatment and equal opportunities for all young people in order to end discrimination in the labour market.

Ensure equal opportunities for all young people to develop the necessary skills and gain practical experience in order to smoothen the transition from education to the labour market.

Guarantee the recognition and validation of competencies acquired through internships, apprenticeships and other forms of work-based learning, as well as volunteering and non-formal education.

Ensure involvement of young people and youth organisations as equal partners in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of employment policies at all levels.

Ensure equal access to quality information and adequate support mechanisms to prepare young people for the changing labour market and future of work.

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#8 QUALITY LEARNING

Background: Education remains a key for active citizenship, inclusive society and employability. That is why we need to enlarge our vision about education for the 21st century, focusing more on transferable skills, student-centred learning and non-formal education to achieve a truly equal and universal access to quality learning.

Goal: Integrate and improve different forms of learning, equipping young people for the challenges of an ever-changing life in the 21st century.

Targets

Guarantee universal and equal access to quality education and life-long learning.

Ensure that all young people have access to adequately funded non-formal education at all levels, that is recognised and validated.

Promote open-mindedness and support the development of interpersonal and intercultural skills.

Create and implement more personalised, participative, and cooperative learner-centred methods in every step of the education process.

Guarantee that education equips all young people with life skills such as money management and health education including sexual and reproductive health

Incorporate methods within formal and non-formal education settings that enable the learner to develop personal skills including critical and analytical thinking, creativity and learning.

Ensure that young people have access to citizenship education to provide them with solid knowledge on political systems, democracy and human rights, attained also through community-based experiences in order to promote active civil participation.

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#9 SPACE AND PARTICIPATION FOR ALL

Background: Young people are underrepresented in decision-making processes which affect them although their engagement is crucial to democracy. They need access to physical spaces in their communities to support their personal, cultural and political development.

Goal: Strengthen young people’s democratic participation and autonomy as well as provide dedicated youth spaces in all areas of society.

Targets

Ensure young people can adequately influence all areas of society and all parts of the decision-making processes, from agenda setting to implementation, monitoring and evaluation through youth-friendly and accessible mechanisms and structures, ensuring that policies respond to the needs of young people.

Ensure equal access to everyday decision making for all young people from different backgrounds.

Increase youth participation and thus equal representation in the electoral process as well as in elected bodies and other decision-making organs at all levels of society.

Provide youth-led physical facilities and infrastructures called youth spaces defined by being autonomous, open and safe, accessible to all, offering professional support for development and ensuring opportunities for youth participation.

Ensure safe virtual youth spaces are accessible to every young person which provide access to information and services as well as ensure opportunities for youth participation.

Ensure sustainable funding, common recognition and development of quality youth work in order to strengthen youth organisations and their role in inclusion, participation and non-formal education.

Provide youth-friendly, relevant, comprehensive information, also developed by and with young people, in order to enable youth participation.

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#10 SUSTAINABLE GREEN EUROPE

Background: Nowadays we consume in a way that our environment can’t handle. Society needs to act against climate change and the growing environmental threats. But our society cannot solve a problem that it is not willing to acknowledge. That is why everyone including young people has to start taking responsibility for their actions, and impact on the life of future generations. Becoming sustainable is not a choice, it is an obligation.

Goal: Achieve a society in which all young people are environmentally active, educated and able to make a difference in their everyday lives.

Targets

Ensure everyone including young people knows the effect of their actions on the environment.

Empower the entire society especially young people to act as agents of change for environmental and sustainable development.

Take into account the environmental impact of every policy and life decision while ensuring that young people are included in sustainable development policy-making on all levels.

Increase international cooperation to eliminate environmentally harmful production and consumption.

Support and strengthen opportunities for young people to volunteer in the environmental sector.

Ensure everyone especially young people has access to eco-friendly infrastructure for living a more sustainable lifestyle.

Expand research and innovation into eco-friendly solutions and technologies.

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#11 YOUTH ORGANISATIONS AND EUROPEAN PROGRAMMES

Background: Youth organisations and European youth programmes involve millions of young people to support their active citizenship and to develop their life skills. However, youth organisations and European youth programmes remain underfunded and lack recognition and accessibility.

Goal: Ensure equal access for all young people to youth organisations and European youth programmes, building a society based on European values and identity.

Targets

Ensure visibility and provide quality information on youth organisations and European youth programmes for all young people.

Ensure sufficient resources from EU programmes for youth organisations to develop projects and access structural support to carry out their missions and to support their work.

Ensure youth organisations and European youth programmes are better bridged with the educational systems and acknowledging them as actors fostering life skills and active citizenship.

Increase the accessibility of European youth programmes, ensure a youth friendly administration process and provide support and quality information for all participants and applicants.

Reach out to and support marginalised young people to be active in youth organisations, youth groups and EU youth programmes.

Increase resources, and widen the variety of grants and diversity of initiatives available for youth organisations and youth groups.

Ensure participation of young people in governance processes of European youth programmes.


(1)  www.youthgoals.eu

The Youth Goals icons have been designed by Mireille van Bremen and can be downloaded together with the design manual.

(2)  With due regard to the subsidiarity, ‘all genders’ should be interpreted in accordance with the national and Union legislation and national circumstances.

(3)  The abbreviation ‘LGBTQI+’ aims to sum up non-heterosexual and/or non-binary identities, the letters stand for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, the + symbolises that it is a non-exhaustive list.

(4)  https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Statistics_on_rural_areas_in_the_EU


ANNEX 4

on the Work Plan for the EU Youth Strategy 2019-2021

Date

Working method/Instrument

Indicative target and output

Related Youth Goals

Proposed by

General Outputs

Once per year

EU Youth Strategy Platform

At least once a year (with stakeholder meetings in between).

Report from platform to be disseminated to a broad audience.

Connecting Youth with EU

Inclusive Societies

Information and Constructive Dialogue

COM

RO, FI, HR Trio Presidency

Overall topic: ‘Creating opportunities for youth’

Mid 2019

Expert group on indicators

Policy indicators to help monitor progress in the implementation of the Youth Strategy

Information and Constructive Dialogue

COM

2019

Expert group on cross-border solidarity

Policy recommendations to feed into the review of the Council Recommendation on the mobility of young volunteers across the European Union

Connecting Youth with EU

Youth Organisations and European Programmes

DE, (COM)

2019 (1st half)

Council Conclusions on increasing the adaptability of young people to the challenges of the future of work

 

Quality Employment for All

Quality Learning

RO

2019 (1st half)

Conference/Seminar on equal access to quality employment for young people

Policy recommendations drawn together with young people on facilitating entry into the labour market

Quality Employment for All

Information and Constructive Dialogue

RO

2019 (1st half)

EU Youth Delegate pilot programme

Pilot programme whereby youth representatives from the country of the acting Presidency can participate in the delivery and/or promotion of Presidency activities in the field of youth, both at EU and national level.

Information and Constructive Dialogue

Space and Participation for All

RO

2019 (2nd half)

Council Conclusions on the education and training of youth workers

Adoption by the Council

Promotion of the quality of youth work through education and training of youth workers

Space and Participation for All

Information and Constructive Dialogue

Quality Learning

FI

2019 (2nd half)

Council Conclusions on digital youth work

Adoption by the Council

Promoting the common understanding and strategic development of digital youth work

Space and Participation for All

Information and Constructive Dialogue

Inclusive Societies

FI

2020

Development of an online course on youth work

Online course on youth work;

Further dissemination of the Handbook on Improving youth work — your guide to quality development (2017)

Further dissemination of the expert group report on Developing digital youth work (2018)

Space and Participation for All

Information and Constructive Dialogue

COM

2020

Peer-learning activity on cross-sectoral approaches in youth work

Compendium of good practice examples

 

COM

2020

Study to propose a toolkit on youth policies reaching grassroots level

Development of a practical toolkit targeted at policy makers at regional and local level on addressing the needs of young people, with special attention on cross-sectorial partnerships

Space and Participation for All

COM

2020

Expert Group on a rights-based approach to youth policies.

Policy recommendations on promoting a rights-based approach to youth

Quality Employment for All

Space and Participation for All

PT

2020

Peer-learning activity

Possible Joint Project with the Committee of Regions.

Multi-level governance and Participation

Strengthening of multi-level governance when promoting the participation of young people on political and other decision-making processes at local, regional, national and European levels

Space and Participation for All

PT

2020 (1st half)

(poss.) Council Conclusions on Youth work in rural areas and promotion of intergenerational solidarity

 

Moving Rural Youth Forward

Inclusive Societies

HR

2020 (1st half)

(poss.) Council Conclusions on Promotion of youth work by raising awareness of the youth sector through information and strengthening of the resources

 

Space and Participation for All

HR

2020 (1st half)

(poss.) topic for the DG meeting Promoting social entrepreneurship among young people

 

Quality Employment for All

Inclusive Societies

HR

DE, PT, SI Trio Presidency

2020 (2nd half)

Updating the 2008 Council Recommendation on the mobility of young volunteers across the European Union

Adoption by Council

Strengthening the potential of the European Youth Programmes in reaching out young people and helping to build a community.

Space and Participation for All

Connecting Youth with EU

Youth Organisations and European Programmes

DE, (COM)

2020 (2nd half)

Council Resolution ‘Agenda on Youth Work’ (term in line with final EU-YS)

Adoption by Council

Summarising/Merging/Consolidating of actions and resolutions in the field of Youth Work in Europe and identifying synergies in the cooperation with the Council of Europe.

Youth Organisations and European Programmes

Space and Participation for All

DE

Dec. 2020

3rd European Youth Work Convention

Start of the implementation process of the European Agenda on Youth Work and Council of Europe Recommendation on Youth Work.

Youth Organisations and European Programmes

Space and Participation for All

DE

2020 (2nd half)

Council Conclusions on youth and democracy

Adoption by Council

Connecting EU with Youth

Space and Participation for All

DE

2020 (2nd half)

(poss.) Joint Meeting DG and Heads of National Agencies for Erasmus+ Youth in Action/European Solidarity Corps

Discussion on the contribution of the new EU Youth Programmes starting in 2021 reaching the political aims of EU Youth Policy.

Youth Organisations and European Programmes

DE

2020 or 2021

(poss.) Peer-learning exercise on digital youth work

 

Space and Participation for All

Information and Constructive Dialogue

FI

2020-2021

Peer-learning activities on national solidarity activities

Peer learning activities to exchange good practices activities

Connecting Youth with EU

Youth Organisations and European Programmes

COM

May 2021

International Seminar

Non-formal and informal education as tools for working with young people in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals.

(poss.) Presidency Conclusions

Sustainable Green Europe

Quality Learning

PT

2021 (1st half)

(poss.) Council Conclusions on ensuring a rights-based approach to youth policies

Adoption by the Council

(having in consideration the Council Conclusions on promoting young people’s access to rights in order to foster their autonomy and participation in civil society, 12 December 2014)

Quality Employment for All

Space and Participation for All

PT

2021 (1st half)

(poss.) Council Conclusions on strengthening the multi-level governance when promoting the participation of young people on political and other decision-making processes at local, regional, national and European levels

Adoption by the Council

By the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the Resolution of the Council on encouraging new and effective forms of participation of all young people in democratic life in Europe

Space and Participation for All

Connecting Youth with EU

PT

2021

Peer-learning activity on innovative ways of financing youth work

Compendium of good practice examples

Space and Participation for All

COM

2021 (2nd half)

Joint Report of the Council and the Commission on the implementation of the EU Youth Strategy

Report on progress made over the 2019-2021 in the implementation of the Youth Strategy, including the triannual work plan

 

SI, (COM)

2021 (2nd half)

Work plan 2022-2024

 

 

SI

2021 (2nd half)

EU Youth dialogue, Council Conclusions

 

 

SI


II Information

INFORMATION FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

European Commission

18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/23


Withdrawal of notification of a concentration

(Case M.9094 — Amcor/Bemis)

(Text with EEA relevance)

(2018/C 456/02)

(Council Regulation (EC) No 139/2004)

On 15 November 2018, the Commission received notification of a proposed concentration between Amcor and Bemis. On 12 December 2018, the notifying parties informed the Commission that they withdrew their notification.


IV Notices

NOTICES FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS, BODIES, OFFICES AND AGENCIES

Council

18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/24


Notice for the attention of certain persons and entities subject to the restrictive measures provided for in Council Decision 2014/145/CFSP and Council Regulation (EU) No 269/2014 concerning restrictive measures in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine

(2018/C 456/03)

The following information is brought to the attention of Mr Aleksandr Viktorovich VITKO (No 19), Mr Dmitry Olegovich ROGOZIN (No 22), Mr Valery Kirillovich MEDVEDEV (No 31), Mr Oleg Yevgenyvich BELAVENTSEV (No 35), Mr Oleg Genrikhovich SAVELYEV (No 36), Denys Volodymyrovych PUSHYLIN (No 46), Mr Igor Nikolaevich BEZLER (No 55), Ms Ekaterina Yurievna GUBAREVA (No 83), Ms Oksana TCHIGRINA (No 89), Mr Sergey Vadimovich ABISOV (No 91), Mr Vladimir Petrovich KONONOV (No 97), Mr Andrei Nikolaevich RODKIN (No 102), Mr Aleksandr Akimovich KARAMAN (No 103), Mr Sergey Yurievich KOZYAKOV (No 120), Ms Larisa Leonidovna AIRAPETYAN (No 122), Mr Yevgeniy Eduardovich MIKHAYLOV (No 129), Vladyslav Mykolayovych DEYNEGO (No 132), Alexandr Vasilievich SHUBIN (No 138), Aleksandr Yurievich TIMOFEEV (No 142) and Mr Andrei Valeryevich KARTAPOLOV (No 149), and the Donetsk Republic (No 24), Peace to Luhansk Region (No 25), Free Donbass (No 26) and Luhansk Economic Union (No 28), persons and entities appearing in the Annex to Council Decision 2014/145/CFSP (1) and in Annex I to Council Regulation (EU) No 269/2014 (2) concerning restrictive measures in respect of actions undermining or threatening the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine.

The Council is considering maintaining the restrictive measures against the above-mentioned persons and entities with new statements of reasons. Those persons and entities are hereby informed that they may submit a request to the Council to obtain the intended statements of reasons for their designation, before 28 December 2018, to the following address:

Council of the European Union

General Secretariat

RELEX.1.C

Rue de la Loi/Wetstraat 175

1048 Bruxelles/Brussel

BELGIQUE/BELGIË

Email: sanctions@consilium.europa.eu

The persons and entities concerned may submit at any time a request to the Council, together with any supporting documentation, that the decision to include and maintain them on the list should be reconsidered, to the address provided above. Such requests will be considered when they are received. In this respect, the attention of the persons and entities concerned is drawn to the regular review by the Council of the list. In order for requests to be considered at the next review, they should be submitted by 14 January 2019.


(1)  OJ L 78, 17.3.2014, p. 16.

(2)  OJ L 78, 17.3.2014, p. 6.


18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/25


Notice for the attention of the persons to whom restrictive measures provided for in Council Decision 2011/172/CFSP and in Council Regulation (EU) No 270/2011 concerning restrictive measures in view of the situation in Egypt apply

(2018/C 456/04)

The following information is brought to the attention of Mr Mohamed Zohir Mohamed Wahed Garrana and Mr Habib Ibrahim Habib Eladli who appear in the Annex to Council Decision 2011/172/CFSP (1) and in Annex I to Council Regulation (EU) No 270/2011 (2) concerning restrictive measures in view of the situation in Egypt.

The Council is considering maintaining the restrictive measures against the above-mentioned persons. The above-mentioned persons are hereby informed that they may submit a request to the Council to obtain the elements the Council holds in its file regarding their designation, before 28 December 2018, to the following address:

Council of the European Union

General Secretariat

RELEX.1.C

Rue de la Loi/Wetstraat 175

1048 Bruxelles/Brussel

BELGIQUE/BELGIË

Email: sanctions@consilium.europa.eu

In this regard, the attention of the persons concerned is drawn to the regular review by the Council of the list of designated persons in Decision 2011/172/CFSP and in Regulation (EU) No 270/2011.


(1)  OJ L 76, 22.3.2011, p. 63.

(2)  OJ L 76, 22.3.2011, p. 4.


European Commission

18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/26


Euro exchange rates (1)

17 December 2018

(2018/C 456/05)

1 euro =


 

Currency

Exchange rate

USD

US dollar

1,1341

JPY

Japanese yen

128,44

DKK

Danish krone

7,4659

GBP

Pound sterling

0,89890

SEK

Swedish krona

10,2725

CHF

Swiss franc

1,1254

ISK

Iceland króna

139,20

NOK

Norwegian krone

9,7838

BGN

Bulgarian lev

1,9558

CZK

Czech koruna

25,801

HUF

Hungarian forint

323,32

PLN

Polish zloty

4,2835

RON

Romanian leu

4,6550

TRY

Turkish lira

6,0958

AUD

Australian dollar

1,5801

CAD

Canadian dollar

1,5189

HKD

Hong Kong dollar

8,8624

NZD

New Zealand dollar

1,6668

SGD

Singapore dollar

1,5588

KRW

South Korean won

1 282,21

ZAR

South African rand

16,2812

CNY

Chinese yuan renminbi

7,8222

HRK

Croatian kuna

7,4028

IDR

Indonesian rupiah

16 529,51

MYR

Malaysian ringgit

4,7292

PHP

Philippine peso

60,123

RUB

Russian rouble

75,5249

THB

Thai baht

37,198

BRL

Brazilian real

4,4355

MXN

Mexican peso

22,8295

INR

Indian rupee

81,2130


(1)  Source: reference exchange rate published by the ECB.


18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/27


Communication from the Commission concerning the prolongation of the specific regime for operating aid for airports with up to 700 000 passengers per annum provided for in the Guidelines on State aid to airports and airlines

(2018/C 456/06)

1.   

The Guidelines on State aid to airports and airlines (1) (‘the Guidelines’) specify the conditions under which public financing of airports and airlines may constitute State aid within the meaning of Article 107(1) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, and when it does constitute State aid, the conditions under which it can be declared compatible with the internal market.

2.   

In principle, operating aid constitutes a very distortive form of aid and can only be authorised under exceptional circumstances. The Commission considers that airports and airlines should normally bear their own operating costs. Nevertheless, to enable the aviation industry to adapt to new market situations, such as increased competition between airports to attract airlines, certain categories of operating aid to airports might still be justified under certain conditions.

3.   

In this context, the Guidelines foresee a transitional period of 10 years from 4 April 2014 during which airports with annual average traffic of up to 3 million passengers per annum can receive operating aid. By the end of the transitional period in 2024, all airports must have reached full coverage of their operating costs and no operating aid to airports will be considered compatible with the internal market after that date, with the exception of operating aid granted in accordance with horizontal State aid rules, such as rules applicable to the financing of services of general economic interest (2).

4.   

The Guidelines recognise that airports with annual passenger traffic of up to 700 000 may face increased difficulties in achieving full cost coverage during the 10-year transitional period. They therefore provide for a specific regime for such airports for an initial period of five years until 3 April 2019.

5.   

For the purposes of that specific regime, the aid amount is, in principle, to be established ex-ante as a fixed sum covering the expected operating funding gap (determined on the basis of an ex-ante business plan) (3). In any event, the maximum permissible aid amount during the whole transitional period is limited to 80 % of the initial operating funding gap for a period of five years (4).

6.   

The Guidelines state that the Commission will reassess the need for continued specific treatment and the future prospects for full operating cost coverage for this category of airports, in particular with regard to changes in market conditions and profitability prospects after four years. The Guidelines contain no specific rules as regards operating aid for this category of airports beyond 3 April 2019.

7.   

In point 175 of the Guidelines, the Commission states that it will undertake a general evaluation of the Guidelines by 4 April 2020, including the rules on operating aid for airports.

8.   

As a review of the specific rules for smaller airports together with the remaining rules on operating aid will allow for a more comprehensive assessment of the market situation, it is appropriate to carry out the reassessment of this specific regime in the context of the overall evaluation of the Guidelines, which will be undertaken by 4 April 2020. This will also allow the Commission to assess the appropriateness of the Guidelines as a whole and, if necessary, to propose a consistent package of changes concerning all categories of airports and all types of aid.

9.   

As a consequence of postponing the evaluation of the specific regime for airports with up to 700 000 passengers per annum, the existing rules need to be prolonged which will provide for continuity and legal certainty in the treatment of this type of aid. Therefore, the specific regime set out in point 130 of the Guidelines is extended until 3 April 2024, aligning the transitional period for the application of the rules for smaller airports with that applicable for airports with more than 700 000 passengers per annum.

10.   

Thus, as of the date of the publication of this Communication in the Official Journal of the European Union, the maximum permissible aid amount for airports with up to 700 000 passengers per annum will be 80 % of the initial operating funding gap for a period of 10 years after the beginning of the transitional period. For instance, if the annual average funding gap of a small airport over the period 2009 to 2013 is equal to EUR 1 million, the maximum amount of operating aid that the airport could receive as an ex-ante established fixed sum would be EUR 8 million over 10 years (80 % x 1 million x 10).


(1)  OJ C 99, 4.4.2014, p. 3.

(2)  See Commission Decision 2012/21/EU of 20 December 2011 on the application of Article 106(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union to State aid in the form of public service compensation granted to certain undertakings entrusted with the operation of services of general economic interest (OJ L 7, 11.1.2012, p. 3); Commission Communication on a European Union framework for State aid in the form of public service compensation (2011) (OJ C 8, 11.1.2012, p. 15).

(3)  See point 121 of the Guidelines.

(4)  See point 130 of the Guidelines.


Court of Auditors

18.12.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 456/29


Special Report No 34/2018

Office accommodation of EU institutions — Some good management practices but also various weaknesses

(2018/C 456/07)

The European Court of Auditors hereby informs you that Special Report No 34/2018 ‘Office accommodation of EU institutions – Some good management practices but also various weaknesses’ has just been published.

The report can be accessed for consultation or downloading on the European Court of Auditors’ website: http://eca.europa.eu


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