Accept Refuse

EUR-Lex Access to European Union law

This document is an excerpt from the EUR-Lex website

Document 52014PC0367

Proposal for a DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL establishing a programme on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens (ISA2) Interoperability as a means for modernising the public sector

/* COM/2014/0367 final - 2014/0185 (COD) */

No longer in force, Date of end of validity: 25/11/2015

52014PC0367

Proposal for a DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL establishing a programme on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens (ISA2) Interoperability as a means for modernising the public sector /* COM/2014/0367 final - 2014/0185 (COD) */


EXPLANATORY MEMORANDUM

1.           CONTEXT OF THE PROPOSAL

1.1         Political context

The public sector plays a key role in the economy as regulator, service provider and employer. It accounts for over 25 % of total employment and a significant proportion of economic activity in the EU Member States. An efficient and productive public sector can be a strong driver of economic growth through its support for, and governance of, the private sector. At a time when governments are facing up to the challenge of ensuring financial consolidation while fostering growth, competitiveness and employment, there is strong justification for efficiency gains, better governance, faster delivery and more user involvement in the public sector[1].

Years of work around themes such as interoperability, eGovernment, open data, cloud computing and social innovation have brought within reach a suite of mature concepts and tools. The core novelty is the capacity of open data, participative tools and interoperable platforms to unleash unprecedented speed, efficiency and quality in the creation and delivery of public goods and services. The potential for interlinked and cooperative open governments joining together contributions from various sectors in an interoperable and secure manner is now high, and realising this ambition will be a crucial element for the successful building of the digital single market.

As mentioned in its 2013 annual growth survey[2], the Commission considers the cross-border interoperability of online services and the digitisation of European public administrations to be important contributors to growth and increased efficiency. Interoperability between administrations is a key enabler for more efficient and effective delivery of digital services, while sharing and re-using existing interoperability solutions could reduce the multiplication of costs. These are important productivity factors that could improve and modernise public administrations at EU, national, regional and local levels[3].

In response to the current economic crisis, the Commission has adopted another important initiative, the Europe 2020 Strategy[4], to turn the EU into a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy, delivering high levels of employment, productivity and social cohesion. Certain key challenges addressed by the Strategy relate directly to the modernisation of European public administrations. As underlined in the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE)[5], a Europe 2020 flagship programme, interoperability is essential to maximising the social and economic potential of ICT and, consequently, DAE can take off only if interoperability is ensured. The DAE’s ‘interoperability and standards’ pillar ties in with policy priorities under other relevant initiatives such as the European Interoperability Strategy (EIS), the European Interoperability Framework (EIF)[6] and the 2012-15 e‑Commission Strategy[7].

On 24 and 25 October 2013, the European Council adopted conclusions stressing that the modernisation of public administrations should continue, with the swift implementation of services, such as e-government, e-health, e-invoicing and e-procurement that rely on interoperability. This will lead to more and better digital services for citizens and enterprises across Europe, cost savings and increased efficiency, transparency and quality of service in the public sector.

Interoperability programmes have come a long way since they were first introduced in 1995. The Commission has demonstrated its dedication to interoperability solutions over a remarkably long period. Today, strong commitment on all sides is essential if the Commission and the Member States are to transform and modernise services within and across Europe. In this context, interoperability, as a key enabler, has led the way to achieving ‘efficient and effective electronic cross-border and cross-sectoral interaction between […] administrations, […] enabling the delivery of electronic public services supporting the implementation of EU policies and activities’, as called for in the decision on the previous programme (ISA Decision Article 1(2)[8]).

Therefore, in responding to real needs, the current proposal for the continuation of the Commission’s interoperability programme will make a strong contribution to the modernisation of European public administrations.

The proposal ties in with other initiatives contributing to the modernisation of public administrations, such as the DAE, Horizon 2020[9], Connecting Europe Facility (CEF)[10] and networks like the European Public Administration Network (EUPAN), the Investment Funds and the European Structural Funds (in the latter two cases by ensuring that funded projects are aligned with the EU‑wide interoperability frameworks and specifications). In a recent report on powering European public‑sector innovation[11], interoperability and work under the previous programme are mentioned as factors conducive to digital innovation and overcoming barriers to public sector modernisation.

This new programme should therefore be a central point of reference and an instrument enabling the ICT-based modernisation of the public sector in Europe and, consequently, an invaluable contribution to achieve the digital single market.

1.2         The importance of interoperability

In today’s Europe, citizens are free to work and re-locate and businesses are free to trade and operate within and across the Union. In doing so, they frequently have to interact electronically with Member State administrations. To facilitate this interaction, Member States are gradually modernising their administrations by improving business processes and ICT infrastructures, thereby reducing their administrative burden and costs while increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the services they provide.

However, because it takes place at national level and lacks European‑level interoperability, such change very often throws up electronic barriers (‘e-barriers’) that prevent citizens and businesses from using public services efficiently and impede the smooth functioning of the internal market.

At the same time, the challenges facing Europe increasingly require common policy responses and consequently the joining of Member States’ forces in implementing these. Applying a broad range of legislative acts is the shared responsibility of the Member States and the Commission and requires interaction across borders and sectors by means of ICT interoperability solutions, which are now an integral part of most legislative acts and a key instrument for such interaction.

1.3         Background

The 1995-99 Interchange of Data between Administrations (IDA) Programme[12] aimed to promote the development and operation of trans-European telematic networks through which Member State administrations could exchange data with each other and/or the EU institutions.

The follow-on programme, IDA II (1999-2004) [13][14], aimed to make the delivery of e‑Government services to European businesses and citizens more efficient.

The 2005-09 IDABC Programme[15] aimed at the interoperable delivery of pan-European e‑Government services to public administrations, businesses and citizens.

The 2010-15 ISA Programme[16] on interoperability solutions for European public administrations had as its objective to support cooperation between European public administrations by facilitating efficient and effective electronic cross-border and cross-sector interaction enabling the delivery of electronic public services to help implement Union policies and activities.

Activities under the above programmes have contributed significantly to ensuring interoperability in the electronic exchange of information between European public administrations. In its Resolution on a competitive digital single market — e-Government as a spearhead (3 April 2012), the European Parliament recognised the contribution and overarching role of the ISA Programme in defining, promoting and supporting the implementation of interoperability solutions and frameworks for European public administrations, achieving synergies, promoting the re-use of infrastructure, digital services and software solutions, and translating public administrations’ interoperability requirements into specifications and standards for digital services. The Parliament also called for an increase in the financial allocations for interoperability solutions between the EU public administrations for 2014-20.

With the ISA Programme coming to an end on 31 December 2015, a new EU programme on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens is needed in order to:

· map and analyse the overall interoperability landscape in Europe and avoid its fragmentation;

· enable, promote and support a holistic approach to the collection, assessment, development, establishment, industrialisation, operation, improvement and maintenance of interoperability solutions, including solutions that facilitate the re-use of data as well as its exchange, in support of cross-border or cross-sector interaction for European public administrations and between them and enterprises and citizens; and

· promote and support the re-usability, integration and convergence of existing solutions, including those from other Union policy areas.

The new programme will contribute to meeting challenges and ensuring continuity while providing a forum for the exchange of ideas and experience.

1.4         Related EU initiatives and interoperability in other policy areas

In the wider context, action under the previous ISA Programme was continuously coordinated and aligned with the ongoing work under the ICT Policy Support Programme (ICT PSP) of the Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme (CIP) and/or with the Commission’s internal ICT strategy, and with action in the context of the 2011-15 European e-Government Action Plan. The ISA Programme supported these and similar initiatives whenever they contributed to interoperability between EU public administrations.

ISA was also well aligned with the CEF Programme, the Union’s funding instrument for trans-European networks in the fields of transport, energy and telecommunications. CEF supports the deployment and operation of key cross-border digital services. The proposed programme is complementary to CEF by including in its scope bringing-up services to operational level, as required, before being taken on board by CEF. It is also one of the enabler and contributor programmes for public sector innovation in Europe.

Interoperability has also made a significant contribution in the area of cloud computing. As stated in the Commission communication ‘Unleashing the Potential of Cloud Computing in Europe’[17], interoperability plays an important role in supporting the “creation of public services based on standards, scalable, and in line with the needs of a mobile population and businesses that want to benefit from the European digital single market”. The proposed programme will take into account the activities of the European Cloud Initiative regarding interoperability.

Interoperability is an enabler of EU policy-making and successful implementation at sectoral level. The following policy areas, among others, rely on interoperability for their effective and efficient implementation:

· Internal market: Directive 2006/123/EC on services in the internal market[18] requires Member States to offer service providers the possibility of completing electronically and across borders all procedures and formalities needed to provide a service outside their home country. In addition, in the area of company law, Directive 2012/17/EU[19] requires the interoperability of Member States’ central, commercial and companies registers via a central platform. Interconnecting company registers will ensure cross-border exchange of information between registers and will facilitate EU-level access for citizens and businesses to data on companies, thus improving the legal certainty of the business environment in Europe;

· Environment: The INSPIRE Directive[20] requires the adoption of common implementing rules laying down technical interoperability arrangements and national infrastructures to be adapted so as to ensure that spatial data and services are interoperable and accessible across borders in the Union;

· Home affairs and Justice: Effectiveness relies on enhanced interoperability and synergies among European databases via, for example, the Visa Information System (VIS), the Schengen Information System II (SIS II), the European Dactyloscopy system (Eurodac) and the e‑Justice portal;

· Customs, taxation and excise duties: with more than 20 years of experience in operating trans-European ICT systems spanning all Member States supporting business services funded by the Fiscalis 2013[21] and Customs 2013[22] programmes, implemented and operated by the Commission and national administrations, interoperability has proven a key success factor. The assets created under Fiscalis 2013 and Customs 2013 programmes are available for sharing and re-use from other policy areas on ‘as is’ basis;

· Health: Directive 2011/24/EU on the application of patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare provides rules for facilitating access to safe, high-quality cross-border healthcare. The Directive sets explicit provisions for achieving wider interoperability of national ICT systems for the electronic exchange of health data. In pharmaceuticals, the European Telematics network is managed by the European Medicines Agency, the national authorities and the Commission. It delivers practical solutions to streamlining the authorisation of medicinal products and an interoperable European pharmacovigilance network.

· Animal Health and Food safety: Effective solutions supporting the full chain of animal and animal product traceability and alerts have been applied for the past 10 years with steady improvements. All actors in the chain (from business to administrations) are involved in the TRACES system. Electronic exchanges between the actors (including third countries) are based on international standards (UNCEFACT) and a system of electronic signatures is being introduced to enable e-processing of almost all official documents.

· European funds: All exchanges of information in relation with the European Regional Development Fund, European Social Fund, Cohesion Fund, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, between beneficiaries and managing authorities, certifying authorities, audit authorities and intermediate bodies are carried out by means of electronic data exchange systems[23], so as to facilitate interoperability with national and EU frameworks and allow beneficiaries to submit all requisite information only once;

· Public sector information: Directive 2013/37/EU[24] provides that, where possible and appropriate, public sector bodies make documents available in open and machine‑readable formats together with their metadata, at the best level of precision and granularity, in a format that ensures interoperability, re-use and accessibility;

· Electronic identity: The Commission’s proposal for a Regulation on electronic identification and trust services for electronic transactions in the internal market[25] stresses that the EU needs an enabling framework to address cross‑border interoperability and improve the coordination of national supervision schemes on EU‑wide accepted electronic identification and electronic authentication;

· ICT standardisation: Regulation (EU) No 1025/2012 on European standardisation[26] refers to interoperability as an essential outcome of standardisation and states that, in order to ensure interoperability in the single market and improve freedom of choice for EU users in the field of ICT, it is appropriate to encourage the use of, or require compliance with, relevant technical specifications at Union level. In this context, the present programme should promote and, where appropriate, support the partial or full standardisation of existing interoperability solutions.

· Production of European Statistics: In Regulation (EC) No 223/2009[27] on European Statistics setting up the basis of the European Statistical System (ESS) and the subsequent Commission Communication 404 (2009)[28] on ‘the production of EU statistics: a vision for the next decade’, interoperability is a key enabler for achieving efficiency gains, reducing the administrative burden reduction and improving the quality of EU statistics for EU citizens, enterprises and policy makers.

· In the area of Public Procurement, Directives 2014/25/EU, 2014/24/EU and 2014/23/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 March 2014 require Member States to implement electronic procurement. They state that the tools and devices to be used for communicating by electronic means, as well as their technical characteristics, have to be interoperable with the information and communication technology products in general use. The Directive 2014/55/EU[29] on electronic invoicing in public procurement adopted by the Parliament on 11 March 2014concerns the development of a European standard for electronic invoicing in public procurement to ensure interoperability between electronic invoicing systems across the EU.

However, for all the above sectorial initiatives to unleash their full potential, cross-sector interoperability has to be considered and placed within the scope of the present programme.

1.5         Grounds for the proposal

To enable efficient and effective interaction with citizens and businesses, Member States should modernise their administrations and provide interoperable digital services at national and European level.

Issues faced by public administrations still include internal organisational complexity, lack of frameworks, ICT architectures and tools enabling interoperability, cultural fragmentation and a lack of cooperation among dispersed institutional entities.

The 2012 interim evaluation of the ISA Programme found that it was relevant[30] in responding to Member States’ needs, on the basis that those addressed by past and current Commission programmes, i.e. IDA, IDABC and ISA, still apply to European public administrations.

The present programme is therefore needed to:

– facilitate cooperation among Member States and the Commission;

– map and analyse the overall interoperability landscape in Europe;

– enable, promote and support a holistic approach to collecting, assessing, developing, establishing, industrialising, operating, improving and maintaining interoperability solutions, including solutions that facilitate the re-use of data as well as its exchange, in support of cross-border or cross-sector interaction between European public administrations, businesses and citizens; and

– at the same time, promote and support the re-usability, integration and convergence of existing solutions, including those derived from other EU policy areas.

A key factor in the success of any interoperability, especially in the area of ICT, is to address it at the right legal level for maximum effect. It should be ensured that the ICT impact of proposed legislation is assessed and measured early in the EU legislative process and that ICT needs are identified in time, allowing for smooth implementation of the legislation when it comes into force.

The present programme will support and promote the assessment of the ICT implications of proposed or adopted Union legislation and planning for the introduction of solutions to support the implementation of such legislation.

2.           RESULTS OF CONSULTATIONS WITH THE INTERESTED PARTIES AND IMPACT ASSESSMENTS

2.1         Consultation of interested parties

Stakeholders’ views on the future of the ISA Programme (the present proposal) were collected between March 2013 and January 2014 in five rounds of formal consultations with Member States. Twelve Commission DGs[31] were also consulted and their comments were taken into account in the proposal.

The Commission presented the ‘state of play’ on preparation of the legal basis for the new ISA Programme to Member States in two official ISA Committee meetings and three ISA Coordination Group meetings. This iterative process enabled it to gather Member States’ feedback on the proposed legislation.

The Commission first informed the Member States of its intention to introduce a new legal decision for the successor ISA Programme in March 2013. It presented a draft of the legislation in an ISA Coordination Group meeting in October 2013 and asked the Member States to provide feedback.

The feedback received from 16 Member States[32] in November 2013 indicated that:

· the new legislation should focus on avoiding duplication of effort and coordinating with other EU programmes (mentioned by 10 Member States);

· the monitoring of results should continue and include quantification of the programme benefits (mentioned by seven Member States);

· the new ISA Programme should contribute to the interoperability ‘big picture’ by using an architecture model/tool such as the European Interoperability Cartography (mentioned by six Member States); and

· the Programme should be driven by a needs-based approach (mentioned by six Member States).

Other, more minor comments were that:

· there is a need to involve different stakeholder groups in the review of the legislation (e.g. citizens, businesses, academia) and to ensure that it addresses their situation;

· the new legislation should stress the importance of re-using data, services and solutions;

· specific references in the legislation should encourage the simplification of processes in the context of the modernisation of public administrations; and

· the new programme should play the role of a facilitator/incubator for Member State and inter-institutional cooperation so as to ensure that solutions are not only put in place but are also sustainable, without efforts being duplicated.

The latest feedback from Member States was gathered in the 16 January 2014 meeting of the ISA Committee, when the time plan for adoption of the new programme was presented and agreed. It was also agreed that, although the legislation should extend to citizens and businesses, public administrations should remain the focal point to ensure end-to-end interoperability.

2.2         Impact assessment

The impact assessment for the present programme was based on a meta-evaluation from the previous programme’s evaluations (2012 interim evaluation for the ISA Programme and the EIS implementation review) and on Member States’ feedback.

The largely positive ISA interim evaluation concluded that the ISA Programme was aligned with the Commission’s policy priorities and Member States’ needs and was implemented efficiently and coherently, delivering results that were re-used by Commission services and Member States. However, it also identified some shortcomings and made recommendations for action with regard to:

· communication and awareness‑raising;

· stakeholder involvement and project management continuity; and

· avoiding overlaps and duplication of work, increasing re-usability and ensuring sustainability.

Also, the evaluators considered that four out of the eleven recommendations from the final evaluation of the predecessor programme (IDABC) were still applicable to the ISA Programme.

The present programme takes the recommendations of the interim report into account and addresses the shortcomings with specific activities, while aiming to consolidate, promote and expand existing ISA Programme activities. In particular, the new programme will help identify, create and operate interoperability solutions, which will then be provided for unlimited use to other Union’s institutions and bodies, and national, regional and local public administrations, thus facilitating cross-border or cross-sector interaction between them. The programme will also develop interoperability solutions autonomously or complement and support other Union initiatives by piloting interoperability solutions as a ‘solution incubator’ or ensuring their sustainability as a ‘solution bridge’.

By doing so, the programme will help reduce the cost and administrative burden of cross‑border interaction for all concerned, further improve the internal market and freedom of movement in the EU without administrative e-barriers, and contribute to the swift implantation of ICT systems supporting EU legislation.

In the event of the present programme not being adopted, existing support for effective and efficient interaction between European public administrations would be dropped, leading to multiplied costs and additional effort. Furthermore, the proliferation of disparate solutions could inadvertently result in new or worse e-barriers, thus impeding the smooth functioning of the internal market and freedom of movement, i.e. the opposite of the objective of modernising European public administrations.

Similarly, the establishment and operation of new interoperability solutions would no longer contribute to ensuring an efficient and effective exchange of data between European public administrations. With no new programme, far fewer EU initiatives would be taken in support of interoperability, which is a pre‑condition for the delivery of cross-border or cross-sector online digital services of European public administrations.

By launching the present programme, the EU will make an important contribution to ensuring smooth interaction between European public administrations to the direct benefit of Member States, businesses and citizens.

The programme will add economic value by supporting the proper functioning of the internal market through solutions that will ensure:

(a)        shorter response times in public administrations’ interaction with citizens and businesses;

(b)        the identification and re-use of existing solutions to serve similar business needs; and

(c)        the automation of cross-border and cross-sector transactions, thus saving resources and time.

Social value would be added in as far as the programme activities will eventually benefit citizens and businesses as users of cross-border and cross-sector electronic public services making use of such common and shared solutions.

3.           LEGAL ELEMENTS OF THE PROPOSAL

3.1         Summary of the proposed legislation

The present programme succeeds the ISA Programme and will consolidate, promote and expand its activities.

In particular, the new programme will:

· help to identify, create and operate interoperability solutions, which will then be provided for unlimited use to other Union institutions and bodies, and national, regional and local public administrations, thus facilitating cross-border or cross-sector interaction between them;

· develop interoperability solutions autonomously or complement and support other Union initiatives by piloting interoperability solutions as a ‘solution incubator’ or ensuring their sustainability as a ‘solution bridge’; and

· assess the ICT implications of existing and proposed EU legislation.

3.2         Legal basis

In accordance with Article 170 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), to help achieve the objectives referred to in Articles 26 and 174 TFEU and to enable citizens of the European Union, economic operators and regional and local communities to derive full benefit from the setting‑up of an area without internal frontiers, the Union should contribute to the establishment and development of trans-European networks by means of actions to promote the interconnectivity and interoperability of national networks, as well as access to them.

In accordance with Article 172 TFEU (previously Article 156 of Treaty Establishing the European Community), ‘the guidelines and other measures referred to in Article 171(1) shall be adopted by the European Parliament and the Council, acting in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure and after consulting the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions. Guidelines and projects of common interest which relate to the territory of a Member State shall require the approval of the Member State concerned.’

3.3         Subsidiarity principle

The subsidiarity principle applies insofar as the proposal does not fall under the exclusive competence of the EU.

The objectives of the proposal cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States acting independently, as this could not produce the interoperability effects necessary for cross-border or cross-sector electronic public services or establish common and shared solutions in support of the interaction between European public administrations.

EU action will achieve the objectives of the proposal more effectively, as the programme will establish and operate interoperability solutions in support of smooth interaction between public administrations across borders or sectors, enabling the delivery of electronic public services supporting the implementation of EU policies and activities.

Therefore, the programme has a clear inherent EU dimension. The proposal therefore complies with the subsidiarity principle.

3.4         Proportionality principle

The programme will support the provision of common and shared solutions, i.e. common frameworks, generic tools and common services, to be applied, as appropriate, by European public administrations for the exchange of information across borders or sectors. In the absence of other provisions, the application of such solutions is subject to Member States’ discretion.

The establishment and improvement of common frameworks and generic tools will be financed via the programme, while the use of such frameworks and tools is to be financed by the users at the administrative level in question. The programme will finance the establishment, industrialisation (i.e. bringing to a state of operational maturity) and improvement of common services, but will finance their actual operation only where this may serve the EU interests. In other cases, the use of the services, including their operation on a decentralised basis, will be financed by the users.

The solutions established by the programme will reduce the financial and administrative burden on European public administrations in interacting with each other. The proposal therefore complies with the proportionality principle.

3.5         Choice of instruments

As with the previous ISA Programme, the legal act proposed is a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council, since in this particular case, a decision is the most appropriate means for complying with the proportionality principle.

4.           BUDGETARY IMPLICATION

The financial envelope for implementation of the new ISA2 Programme for the period 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2020 is EUR 130 928 000. The proposed envelope is consistent with the current Multiannual Financial Framework for the years 2014-2020.

Further details are provided in the legislative financial statement accompanying the proposal.

5.           OPTIONAL ELEMENTS

European Economic Area

The proposed act concerns an EEA matter and should therefore extend to the European Economic Area.

Candidate countries

The proposed act is open to participation by candidate countries.

2014/0185 (COD)

Proposal for a

DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

establishing a programme on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens (ISA2)

Interoperability as a means for modernising the public sector

(Text with EEA relevance)

THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, and in particular Article 172 thereof,

Having regard to the proposal from the European Commission,

After transmission of the draft legislative act to the national parliaments,

Having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee[33],

Having regard to the opinion of the Committee of the Regions[34],

Acting in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure,

Whereas:

(1)       In a series of Ministerial Declarations (in Manchester on 24 November 2005, Lisbon on 19 September 2007, Malmö on 18 November 2009 and Granada on 19 April 2010), ministers invited the Commission to facilitate cooperation among Member States by implementing cross-border and cross-sector interoperability solutions that will enable more efficient and secure public services. Moreover, Member States recognised that better public services need to be delivered with fewer resources, and that the potential of e-Government can be boosted by promoting a culture of collaboration and improving the conditions for interoperability in European public administrations.

(2)       In its Communication of 19 May 2010 to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on A Digital Agenda for Europe[35] (DAE), one of the flagship initiatives of its Europe 2020 Strategy[36], the Commission stressed that interoperability is essential to maximise the social and economic potential of ICT and that, consequently, the Digital Agenda can take off only if interoperability is ensured.

(3)       In its Communication of 16 December 2010 to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions Towards interoperability for European public services[37], the Commission introduced the European Interoperability Strategy (EIS) and the European Interoperability Framework (EIF).

(4)       At Union level, interoperability facilitates successful implementation of policies. The following policies in particular rely on interoperability for their effective and efficient implementation:

(5)       In the area of the internal market, Directive 2006/123/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council[38] requires Member States to offer service providers the possibility of completing electronically and across borders all procedures and formalities needed to provide a service outside their home country.

(6)       In the area of company law, Directive 2012/17/EU[39] requires the interoperability of Member States’ central, commercial and companies registers via a central platform. The interconnection of company registers will ensure cross-border exchange of information between registers and will facilitate EU-level access for citizens and businesses to data on companies, thus improving legal certainty in the business environment in Europe.

(7)       In the area of environment, Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council[40] requires the adoption of common implementing rules laying down technical interoperability arrangements. In particular, that Directive requires national infrastructures to be adapted to ensure that spatial data and services are interoperable and accessible across borders in the Union.

(8)       In the area of home affairs and justice, enhanced interoperability among European databases is the basis of the Visa Information System (VIS)[41], the Schengen Information System II (SIS II)[42], the European Dactyloscopy system (Eurodac)[43] and the e‑Justice portal[44]. Furthermore, on 24 September 2012, the Council adopted conclusions calling for the introduction of the European Legislation Identifier (ELI) and highlighting the need for interoperable searching and exchange of legal information published in national official journals and legal gazettes, through the use of unique identifiers and structured metadata.

(9)       Interoperability has been a key factor to success in the area of Customs, Taxation and excise duties, in operating trans-European ICT systems spanning all Member States supporting interoperable business services funded by the Fiscalis 2013 and Customs 2013 programmes, implemented and operated by the Commission and national administrations. Assets created under Fiscalis 2013 and Customs 2013 programmes are available for sharing and re-use from other policy areas.

(10)     In the area of health, Directive 2011/24/EU[45] provides rules for facilitating access to safe, high-quality cross-border healthcare. Specifically, the Directive established the eHealth Network to address the interoperability challenge between electronic health systems. The Network can adopt guidelines on the minimum data set to be exchanged across borders in case of unplanned and emergency care and on ePrescription services across national borders.

(11)     In the area of European funds, Article 122 of Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council[46] requires all exchanges of information between beneficiaries and managing authorities, certifying authorities, audit authorities and intermediate bodies to be carried out by means of electronic data‑exchange systems. These systems are to facilitate interoperability with national and Union frameworks and allow beneficiaries to submit all requisite information only once.

(12)     In the area of public sector information, Directive 2013/37/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council[47] stresses that public sector bodies should, where possible and appropriate, make documents available through open and machine-readable formats together with their metadata, at the best level of precision and granularity, in a format that ensures interoperability, re-use and accessibility.

(13)     In the area of electronic identity, the proposal of the Commission of 4 June 2012 for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on electronic identification and trust services for electronic transactions in the internal market[48] highlights the need for the Union to create an enabling framework to address cross-border interoperability and to improve the coordination of national supervision schemes on Union-wide accepted electronic identification and electronic authentication.

(14)     In the area of ICT standardisation, Regulation (EU) No 1025/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council[49] refers to interoperability as an essential outcome of standardisation.

(15)     In the area of research and innovation, Regulation (EU) No 1291/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council, establishing Horizon 2020[50], clearly mentions that interoperable solutions and standards in ICT are key enablers for the partnering of industries at Union level. Collaboration around common, open‑technology platforms with spill-over and leverage effects will allow a wide range of stakeholders to benefit from new developments and create further innovations.

(16)     In public procurement, Directives 2014/25/EU[51], 2014/24/EU[52] and 2014/23/EU[53] of the European Parliament and of the Council of 28 March 2014 require Member States to implement electronic procurement. They state that the tools and devices to be used for communicating by electronic means, as well as their technical characteristics, must be interoperable with the information and communication technology products in general use. Moreover, Directive 2014/55/EU[54] on electronic invoicing in public procurement adopted by the Parliament on 11 March 2014 concerns the development of a European standard for electronic invoicing in public procurement to ensure interoperability between electronic invoicing systems across the EU.

(17)     Interoperability is also a fundamental element of the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) established by Regulation (EU) No 1316/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council[55] in the area of broadband infrastructure and services. The Regulation 2014/283/EU[56] on guidelines for trans-European networks in the area of telecommunications infrastructure explicitly mentions that an operational priority for the CEF to achieve its objectives is the interoperability, connectivity, sustainable deployment, operation and upgrading of trans-European digital service infrastructures as well as their coordination at Union level.

(18)     At political level, the Council has repeatedly called for even greater interoperability in Europe and for continued efforts to modernise European public administrations. In particular, on 24 and 25 October 2013, the European Council adopted conclusions stressing that the modernisation of public administrations should continue through the swift implementation of services such as e-government, e-health, e-invoicing and e‑procurement, which rely on interoperability.

(19)     A single sector interoperability perspective is associated with the risk that the adoption of different or incompatible solutions at national or sectoral levels will throw up new e-barriers that impede the proper functioning of the internal market and the associated freedoms of movement, and undermine the openness and competitiveness of markets and the delivery of services of general interest to citizens and enterprises. In order to mitigate this risk, Member States and the Union should step up joint efforts to avoid market fragmentation and ensure cross‑border or cross-sector interoperability in the implementation of legislation, while reducing administrative burdens and costs, and promote commonly agreed ICT solutions, while ensuring appropriate governance.

(20)     Several successive programmes have sought to ensure the coherent development and implementation of global and sectoral interoperability strategies, legal frameworks, guidelines, services and tools to address requirements under Union‑wide policies, such as:

– the IDA Programme (1999-2004) set up by Decision 1719/1999/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council[57] and by Decision No 1720/1999/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council[58],

– the IDABC Programme (2005-09) set up by Decision 2004/387/EC e-Government[59]; and the

– the ISA Programme (2010-15) set up by Decision No 922/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council[60].

(21)     Activities under the IDA, IDABC and ISA Programmes have made important contributions to ensuring interoperability in the electronic exchange of information between public administrations of the Union. In its Resolution on a competitive digital single market — e-Government as a spearhead (3 April 2012)[61], the European Parliament recognised the contribution of the ISA Programme and its overarching role in defining, promoting and supporting the implementation of interoperability solutions and frameworks for European public administrations, achieving synergies, promoting the re-use of solutions and translating their interoperability requirements into specifications and standards for digital services.

(22)     With Decision No 922/2009/EC ceasing to apply on 31 December 2015, a new Union Programme on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens (ISA2) is needed in order to map and analyse the overall interoperability landscape in Europe and avoid its fragmentation. The Programme will enable, support and promote a holistic approach to the collection, assessment, development, establishment, industrialisation, operation, improvement and maintenance of interoperability solutions, including solutions that facilitate the re-use of data as well as its exchange, in support of European public administrations’ cross‑border or cross-sector interactions with each other and with enterprises and citizens. Finally, the Programme will promote the re-usability, integration and convergence of existing solutions, including those derived from other Union policy areas.

(23)     Solutions established or operated under the present ISA2 Programme should, as far as possible, form part of a consistent environment of services facilitating interaction between European public administrations, enterprises and citizens, and ensuring, facilitating and enabling cross-border or cross-sector interoperability.

(24)     Citizens and enterprises should also benefit from common, re-usable and interoperable front-office services resulting from better integration of processes and exchange of data through the European public administrations’ back-offices.

(25)     The ISA2 Programme should be an instrument for public‑sector modernisation in the Union.

(26)     Interoperability is directly connected with, and dependent on the use of, standards and common specifications. The ISA2 Programme should promote and, where appropriate, support the partial or full standardisation of existing interoperability solutions. This should be achieved in cooperation with other standardisation activities at Union level, European standardisation organisations and other international standardisation organisations.

(27)     The modernisation of public administrations is one of the key priorities for successful implementation of the Europe 2020 Strategy. In this context, the Annual Growth Surveys published by the Commission in 2011, 2012 and 2013 show that the quality of European public administrations has a direct impact on the economic environment and is therefore crucial to stimulating productivity, competitiveness and growth. This is clearly reflected in the country-specific recommendations, which call for specific action aimed at public administration reform.

(28)     Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 includes a thematic objective of ‘enhancing institutional capacity of public authorities and stakeholders and an efficient public administration’. In this context, the ISA2 Programme should tie in with programmes and initiatives contributing to the modernisation of public administrations like e.g. the DAE, and related networks like e.g. the European Public Administration Network (EUPAN) and seek synergies with them.

(29)     Interoperability of European public administrations concerns all levels of administration: European, local, regional and national. It is therefore important that solutions take into account their respective needs, as well as those of citizens and enterprises where relevant.

(30)     National administrations can be supported in their endeavours through specific instruments under the European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF). Close cooperation under the ISA2 Programme should maximise the benefits expected from such instruments by ensuring that funded projects are aligned with the Union‑wide interoperability frameworks and specifications such as the EIF.

(31)     This Decision lays down a financial envelope for the entire duration of the ISA2 programme which constitute the prime reference amount, within the meaning of Point 17 of the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013[62] between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management, for the European Parliament and the Council during the annual budgetary procedure.

(32)     Consideration should be given to the possibility of using pre-accession funds to facilitate candidate countries’ participation in the ISA2 Programme and the adoption and further implementation in those countries of solutions provided under it.

(33)     The ISA2 Programme should contribute to the implementation of any follow-on initiatives in the context of Europe 2020 and the DAE. In order to avoid any duplication of effort, it should take account of other Union programmes in the field of ICT solutions, services and infrastructures, in particular the CEF laid down in Regulation 1316/2013/EU and Horizon 2020 laid down in Regulation (EU) No 1291/2013.

(34)     In order to ensure uniform conditions for the implementation of this Decision, implementing powers should be conferred on the Commission. Those powers should be exercised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council[63].

(35)     The Commission should adopt immediately applicable implementing acts where, in duly justified cases relating to the established rolling work programme, imperative grounds of urgency so require.

(36)     The objectives of this Decision are to facilitate efficient and effective electronic cross‑border or cross-sector interaction between European public administrations and between them and citizens and businesses, to enable the delivery of electronic public services supporting the implementation of Union policies and activities. Since this cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States acting alone because the coordination function at the European level would be difficult and costly to set up at the level of the Member States by Member States themselves and can therefore, by reason of the scale and effects of the proposed action, be better achieved at Union level, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality, as set out in that Article l, this Decision does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve those objectives,

HAVE ADOPTED THIS DECISION:

Article 1 Subject matter and objective

1.           This Decision establishes, for 2016-20, a programme on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens (hereinafter referred to as ‘the ISA2 programme’).

The ISA2 programme shall facilitate efficient and effective electronic cross-border or cross-sector interaction between European public administrations and between them and citizens and businesses, in order to enable the delivery of electronic public services supporting the implementation of Union policies and activities.

2.           Through the ISA2 Programme, the Union shall identify, create and operate interoperability solutions implementing Union policies. These solutions shall subsequently be provided for unlimited use to other Union institutions and bodies, and to national, regional and local public administrations, thus facilitating cross‑border or cross-sector interaction between them.

3.           The ISA2 Programme shall develop interoperability solutions autonomously or complement and support other Union initiatives by piloting interoperability solutions as a solution incubator or by ensuring their sustainability as a solution bridge.

4.           The ISA2 programme succeeds the Union programme on interoperability solutions for public administrations established by Decision No 922/2009/EC (hereinafter referred to as ‘the ISA programme’) and shall consolidate, promote and expand its activities.

Article 2 Definitions

For the purposes of this Decision, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) ‘interoperability’ means the ability of disparate and diverse organisations to interact towards mutually beneficial and agreed common goals, involving the sharing of information and knowledge between the organisations, through the business processes they support, by means of the exchange of data between their respective information and communication technology (ICT) systems;

(2) ‘interoperability solutions’ means common frameworks, common services and generic tools facilitating cooperation between disparate and diverse organisations, either autonomously funded and developed by the ISA2 Programme or developed in cooperation with other Union initiatives, based on identified requirements of European public administrations;

(3) acting as a ‘solution incubator’ means the development of, or support for, interoperability solutions during their pilot phase, before they become operational under other Union programmes or initiatives;

(4) acting as a ‘solution bridge’ means the further development of, and support for, fully operational interoperability solutions before their delivery under other Union programmes or initiatives;

(5) ‘common frameworks’ means specifications, standards, methodologies, guidelines, common semantic assets and similar approaches and documents;

(6) ‘common services’ means the organisational and technical capacity to deliver a common outcome to users, including operational systems, applications and digital infrastructures of a generic nature which meet common user requirements across policy or geographical areas, along with their supporting operational governance;

(7) ‘generic tools’ means systems, reference platforms, shared and collaborative platforms, and generic components which meet common user requirements across policy or geographical areas;

(8) ‘actions’ means projects, solutions already in their operational phase and accompanying measures;

(9) ‘project’ means a time-limited sequence of well-defined tasks addressing identified user needs through a phased approach;

(10) ‘accompanying measures’ means:

– strategic and awareness-raising measures;

– measures in support of the management of the ISA2 Programme;

– measures in relation to the sharing of experience and the exchange and promotion of good practices;

– measures to promote the re-use of existing interoperability solutions;

– measures aimed at community-building and capability-raising; and

– measures aimed at establishing synergies with initiatives relevant to interoperability in other areas of Union policy;

(11) ‘European Interoperability Reference Architecture (EIRA)’ means an architecture of a generic structure, comprising a set of principles and guidelines applying to the implementation of interoperability solutions in the European Union;

(12) ‘European Interoperability Cartography (EIC)’ means a repository of interoperability solutions for European public administrations provided by Union institutions and Member States, presented in a common format and complying with specific re-usability and interoperability criteria that can be represented on the EIRA.

Article 3 Activities

The ISA2 Programme shall support and promote:

(a) the assessment, improvement, establishment, industrialisation, operation and re-use of existing cross-border or cross-sector interoperability solutions;

(b) the development, establishment, industrialisation, operation and re-use of new cross‑border or cross-sector interoperability solutions;

(c) the assessment of the ICT implications of proposed or adopted Union legislation;

(d) the identification of legislation gaps that hamper interoperability between European public administrations;

(e) the establishment, maintenance and improvement of the EIRA;

(f) the establishment and maintenance of the EIC as an instrument to facilitate the re-use of existing interoperability solutions and to identify the areas where such solutions are still lacking;

(g) the assessment, update and promotion of existing common specifications and standards and the development, establishment and promotion of new common specifications and standards through the Union’s standardisation platforms and in cooperation with European or international standardisation organisations as appropriate; and

(h) the development of mechanisms that will measure and quantify the benefits of interoperability solutions.

In addition, the ISA2 Programme may act as a ‘solution incubator’, piloting new interoperability solutions, and as a ‘solution bridge’, operating existing interoperability solutions.

Article 4 General principles

Actions launched or continued under the ISA2 Programme shall:

(a) be based on utility and driven by identified needs;

(b) comply with the following set of principles:

– subsidiarity and proportionality;

– user-centricity;

– inclusion and accessibility;

– security and privacy;

– multilingualism;

– administrative simplification;

– transparency;

– preservation of information;

– openness;

– re-usability;

– technological neutrality and adaptability; and

– effectiveness and efficiency;

(c) be extensible and applicable to other business or policy areas; and

(d) demonstrate financial, organisational and technical sustainability.

Article 5 Actions

1.           The Commission shall, in cooperation with the Member States, implement the actions specified in the rolling work programme established pursuant to Article 7, in accordance with the implementation rules laid down in Article 6.

2.           Actions in the form of projects shall, where appropriate, consist of the following phases:

– initiation;

– planning;

– execution;

– closing; and

– monitoring and control.

The phases of specific projects shall be defined and specified at the time when the action is included in the rolling work programme.

3.           The implementation of the ISA2 Programme shall be supported by accompanying measures.

Article 6 Implementation rules

1.           In the implementation of the ISA2 Programme, due consideration shall be given to the European Interoperability Strategy, the European Interoperability Framework and their future updates.

2.           Involvement of the largest possible number of Member States in a project shall be encouraged. Member States shall be able, and encouraged, to join a project at any stage.

3.           In order to ensure interoperability between national and Union information systems, interoperability solutions shall be specified with reference to existing and new European standards or publicly available or open specifications for information exchange and service integration.

4.           The establishment or improvement of interoperability solutions shall, where appropriate, build on or be accompanied by the sharing of experience and the exchange and promotion of good practices. The sharing of experience and good practices between all stakeholders and relevant public consultations shall be encouraged.

5.           In order to avoid duplication and to speed up the establishing of interoperability solutions, results achieved by other relevant Union and Member State initiatives shall be taken into account where appropriate.

6.           The implementation of interoperability solutions under the ISA2 Programme shall, where appropriate, be guided by the EIRA.

7.           Interoperability solutions and their updates shall be included in the EIC and made available, where appropriate, for re-use by European public administrations.

8.           The Commission shall monitor periodically the implementation and re-use of interoperability solutions across the Union, as part of the rolling work programme established pursuant to Article 7.

9.           In order to maximise synergies and ensure complementary and combined efforts, actions shall, where appropriate, be coordinated with other relevant Union initiatives.

10.         All actions and interoperability solutions funded under the ISA2 Programme shall be encouraged, where appropriate, to re-use available interoperability solutions.

Article 7 Rolling work programme

1.           At the start of the ISA2 Programme, the Commission shall adopt implementing acts establishing a rolling work programme and amending it at least once a year, for the implementation of actions for the entire period of application of this Decision. Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 10(2).

The rolling work programme shall identify, prioritise, document, select, design, implement and evaluate the actions referred to in Article 5, as well as promote their results.

2.           The inclusion of actions in the rolling work programme shall be subject to compliance with a set of rules and admission criteria before being included in the rolling work programme. Those rules and criteria and any amendments thereof shall be an integral part of the rolling work programme.

3.           A project originally launched and developed under the ISA Programme or another Union initiative may be included in the rolling work programme in any of its phases.

Article 8 Budgetary provisions

1.           Funds shall be released whenever a project or a solution in its operational phase is included in the rolling work programme or after successful completion of a project phase as defined in the rolling work programme and any amendments thereto.

2.           Amendments to the rolling work programme concerning budgetary allocations of more than EUR 400 000 per action shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 10(2).

3.           Actions under the ISA2 Programme may require the procurement of external services, which shall be subject to EU procurement rules as laid down in Regulation (EU, Euratom) N° 966/2012.

Article 9 Actions and interoperability solutions eligible for financing

1.           The development, establishment and improvement of common frameworks and generic tools shall be funded by the ISA2 Programme. The use of such frameworks and tools shall be financed by the users.

2.           The development, establishment, industrialisation and improvement of common services shall be funded by the ISA2 Programme. A centralised operation of such services at Union level may be also funded by the Programme, in cases where such an operation is considered by the Commission as serving Union interests and is duly justified in the rolling work programme. In all other cases, use of those services shall be financed by other means.

3.           Interoperability solutions taken over by the ISA2 Programme as ‘solution incubator’ or as ‘solution bridge’ shall be funded by the Programme until they are taken over by other programmes or initiatives.

4.           Accompanying measures shall be funded by the Programme.

Article 10 Committee

1.           The Commission shall be assisted by the Committee on Interoperability Solutions for European Public Administrations, Businesses and Citizens (the ISA2 Committee) established under Regulation (EU) No 182/2011.

2.           Where reference is made to this paragraph, Article 5 of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 shall apply.

3.           On duly justified imperative grounds of urgency, the Commission shall adopt immediately applicable implementing acts in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 8 of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011. Those acts shall remain in force for a period not exceeding 6 months.

Article 11 Monitoring and evaluation

1.           The Commission and the ISA2 Committee shall regularly monitor the implementation and impact of the ISA2 Programme and users’ satisfaction with it. They shall also explore synergies with complementary Union programmes.

2.           The Commission shall report annually to the ISA2 Committee on the implementation of the Programme.

3.           The Programme shall be subject to an interim evaluation and a final evaluation, the results of which shall be communicated to the European Parliament and the Council by 31 December 2018 and 31 December 2021 respectively. In this context, the responsible committee of the Parliament may invite the Commission to present the evaluation results and answer questions raised by its members.

4.           The evaluations shall examine issues such as the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, utility, sustainability and coherence of Programme actions. The final evaluation shall, in addition, examine the extent to which the Programme has achieved its objective.

5.           The performance of the Programme shall be assessed against the objective laid out in Article 1 and the actions of the rolling work programme. The objective shall be measured in particular through the number of key interoperability enablers and through the number of supporting instruments for public administrations delivered to and used by European public administrations. Indicators for measuring the result and impact of the Programme shall be defined in the rolling work programme.

6.           The evaluations shall also examine the benefits of the actions to the Union for the advancement of common policies, identify areas for potential improvement and verify synergies with other Union initiatives in the area of cross-border or cross-sector interoperability and the modernisation of European public administrations.

7.           Completed or suspended actions shall remain subject to the overall programme evaluation. They shall be monitored regarding their position in the overall landscape of interoperability solutions in Europe and evaluated in terms of user uptake, utilisation and re-usability.

8.           The evaluation of the ISA2 Programme shall contain, where applicable, information regarding:

(a) quantifiable benefits that the interoperability solutions deliver by linking ICT with users’ needs;

(b) the quantifiable positive impact of the interoperable ICT‑based solutions.

Article 12 International cooperation

1.           The ISA2 Programme shall be open to participation by the countries of the European Economic Area and the candidate countries in the framework of their respective agreements with the Union.

2.           Cooperation with other third countries and international organisations or bodies shall be encouraged, notably in the framework of the Euro-Mediterranean and Eastern Partnerships and with neighbouring countries, in particular those of the Western Balkans and Black Sea regions. Related costs shall not be covered by the ISA2 Programme.

3.           Where appropriate, the Programme shall promote re-use of its solutions by third countries.

Article 13 Non-Union initiatives

Without prejudice to other Union policies, interoperability solutions established or operated by the ISA2 Programme may be used by non-Union initiatives, for non-commercial purposes, provided that no extra costs are incurred for the general budget of the Union and the main Union objective of the interoperable solution is not compromised.

Article 14 Financial provisions

1.           The financial envelope for the implementation of Union action under this Decision for the period of its application shall be EUR 130 928 000.

2.           The annual appropriations shall be authorised by the budgetary authority within the limits of the financial framework.

3.           The financial allocation for the Programme may also cover expenses pertaining to preparatory, monitoring, checking, audit and evaluation activities which are required on a regular basis for the management of the programme and the achievement of its objectives.

Article 15 Entry into force

This Decision shall enter into force on the twentieth day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

It shall apply from 1 January 2016 until 31 December 2020.

Done at Brussels,

For the European Parliament                        For the Council

The President                                                 The President

LEGISLATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENT

1.           FRAMEWORK OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

              1.1.    Title of the proposal/initiative

              1.2.    Policy area(s) concerned in the ABM/ABB structure

              1.3.    Nature of the proposal/initiative

              1.4.    Objective(s)

              1.5.    Grounds for the proposal/initiative

              1.6.    Duration and financial impact

              1.7.    Management mode(s) envisaged

2.           MANAGEMENT MEASURES

              2.1.    Monitoring and reporting rules

              2.2.    Management and control system

              2.3.    Measures to prevent fraud and irregularities

3.           ESTIMATED FINANCIAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

              3.1.    Multiannual financial framework heading(s) and expenditure budget line(s) affected

              3.2.    Estimated impact on expenditure

              3.2.1. Summary of estimated impact on expenditure

              3.2.2. Estimated impact on operational appropriations

              3.2.3. Estimated impact on appropriations of an administrative nature

              3.2.4. Compatibility with the current multiannual financial framework

              3.2.5. Third-party contributions

              3.3.    Estimated impact on revenue

LEGISLATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENT

1.           FRAMEWORK OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

1.1.        Title of the proposal/initiative

Decision of the European Parliament and of the Council on interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens (ISA2)

1.2.        Policy area(s) concerned in the ABM/ABB structure[64]

Information and Communication Technologies — Operational programme under Title 26: Commission’s administration

Activity: 26 03 Services to public administrations, businesses and citizens

1.3.        Nature of the proposal/initiative

ü The proposal/initiative relates to a new action

¨ The proposal/initiative relates to a new action following a pilot project/preparatory action[65]

¨ The proposal/initiative relates to the extension of an existing action

¨ The proposal/initiative relates to an action redirected towards a new action

1.4.        Objective(s)

1.4.1.     Commission multiannual strategic objective(s) targeted by the proposal/initiative

The general objective is to facilitate efficient and effective electronic cross-border or cross-sector interaction between European public administrations and between them and citizens and businesses, to enable the delivery of electronic public services supporting the implementation of Union policies and activities and the exchange of public sector information.

The specific objectives are to:

-         improve, operate and re-use existing cross-border or cross-sector interoperability solutions;

-         develop, operate and re-use new cross-border or cross-sector interoperability solutions;

-         assess the ICT implications of proposed or adopted Union legislation and identify areas in which new legislation could promote interoperability;

-         create a European Interoperability Reference Architecture (EIRA) to be used as the tool for building and assessing interoperability solutions;

-         create an instrument to facilitate the re-use of existing interoperability solutions and to identify the areas in which such solutions are still missing;

-         assess and promote existing common specifications and standards and develop new common specifications and standards; and

-         introduce a mechanism that will measure and quantify the benefits of interoperability solutions.

1.4.2.     Specific objective(s) and ABM/ABB activity(ies) concerned

Specific objective No 26

Interoperable delivery of pan-European e-government services to public administrations, businesses and citizens

-         Investing in modern public administrations — interoperability solutions

ABM/ABB activity(ies) concerned

ABB Activity 26.03: Services to public administrations, businesses and citizens

1.4.3.     Expected result(s) and impact

Specify the effects that the proposal/initiative should have on the beneficiaries/groups targeted.

The development of better interoperability solutions for European public administrations and between them and businesses/citizens will significantly improve the exchange of information between Member States and create opportunities for significant cost reductions.

Through the ISA2 Programme, DIGIT will work, with other Commission services and in close cooperation with Member States and other stakeholders, on key interoperability enablers, support for the effective implementation of EU policies and legislation, and facilitating the delivery of, and support for, electronic public services for use by European public administrations.

It actively supports the modernisation of European public administrations for the benefit of Union initiatives, Member States, citizens and businesses.

1.4.4.     Indicators of results and impact

Specify the indicators for monitoring implementation of the proposal/initiative.

The Commission has identified a general objective and a set of specific objectives (see paragraph 1.4.1).

Achievement of these objectives is expected to feed into outcome indicators by means of which the ‘intervention logic’ of the Programme can be formally measured. The indicators and expected results have been developed in the ex-ante evaluation and are set out in the relevant accompanying document.

The specific objectives, outcomes and indicators fall into the following five main categories that represent the lines of action under the Programme:

–        key interoperability enablers;

–        support for the effective implementation of EU legislation;

–        support instruments for public administrations;

–        accompanying measures; and

–        monitoring activities.

The budgetary impact of the Programme is shown in Table 3.2.2. Programme evaluation will examine issues such as the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, utility, sustainability and coherence of the actions and assess performance against the Programme’s objective and the rolling work programme.

1.5.        Grounds for the proposal/initiative

1.5.1.     Requirement(s) to be met in the short or long term

The ISA2 Programme will have to meet the need to create key interoperability enablers, support the effective implementation of Union legislation, provide support instruments to European public administrations and build on existing or new common frameworks, common services, and re-usable generic tools.

These needs have been identified through exchanges of views with those involved in other areas of Union policy and Member State representatives, through the ex-ante evaluation and through the formal consultation described in the explanatory memorandum. The main beneficiaries of activities under the Programme will be European public administrations. Businesses and citizens will benefit indirectly through the provision of services by public administrations.

1.5.2.     Added value of EU involvement

All activity areas covered by the ISA2 Programme are under the shared responsibility of Member States and the European Union. Therefore, the Programme will intervene only in cases of demonstrable European added value, as specified in the explanatory memorandum.

The Programme management committee will ensure coherence and complementarity with activities at Member State level. At Union level, inter-service coordination will ensure that activities are aligned with those in other policy areas (e.g. European Semester, country-specific reports/recommendations) and with the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) and Digital Agenda pillar II on interoperability and standards, with a view to maximising coherence and synergies. The close cooperation and coordination with Member States and other policy areas will help the Programme constantly to assess actual needs, the proportionality of activities and the respect of subsidiarity.

As stressed in the explanatory memorandum, the ISA2 Programme will add primarily financial and economic value to Union intervention and contribute to the reinforcement and implementation of Union policies and legislation, achieving considerable synergies through coordination across borders or sectors.

1.5.3.     Lessons learned from similar experiences in the past

The Commission’s report to the European Parliament and the Council on the interim evaluation of the previous ISA Programme highlights the largely positive conclusions of the evaluation. All the recommendations have been addressed in the new ISA2 Programme.

1.5.4.     Compatibility and possible synergy with other appropriate instruments

As stated in the explanatory memorandum, coherence with and complementarity to the CEF is ensured and is expected to lead to synergies.

1.6.        Duration and financial impact

ü Proposal/initiative of limited duration

– ü  Proposal/initiative in effect from 1.1.2016 to 31.12.2020

– ¨  Financial impact from YYYY to YYYY

¨ Proposal/initiative of unlimited duration

– Implementation with a start-up period from YYYY to YYYY,

– followed by full-scale operation.

1.7.        Management mode(s) planned[66]

ü Direct management by the Commission

– ü by its departments, including by its staff in the Union delegations;

– ¨  by the executive agencies;

¨ Shared management with the Member States

¨ Indirect management by delegating implementation tasks to:

– ¨ third countries or the bodies they have designated;

– ¨ international organisations and their agencies (to be specified);

– ¨the EIB and the European Investment Fund;

– ¨ bodies referred to in Articles 208 and 209 of the Financial Regulation;

– ¨ public law bodies;

– ¨ bodies governed by private law with a public service mission to the extent that they provide adequate financial guarantees;

– ¨ bodies governed by the private law of a Member State that are entrusted with the implementation of a public-private partnership and that provide adequate financial guarantees;

– ¨ persons entrusted with the implementation of specific actions in the CFSP pursuant to Title V of the TEU, and identified in the relevant basic act.

– If more than one management mode is indicated, please provide details in the ‘Comments’ section.

Comments

The ISA2 Programme will commence on 1 January 2016.

2.           MANAGEMENT MEASURES

2.1.        Monitoring and reporting rules

Specify frequency and conditions

Regular monitoring of programme implementation is planned in accordance with the principle of sound financial management and the Commission’s administrative procedures. Monitoring will include annual reporting to the management committee on progress made in implementing the supported activities.

The Programme will be subject to an interim evaluation and a final evaluation, the results of which will be communicated to the European Parliament and the Council by 31 December 2018 and 31 December 2021 respectively. In this context, the responsible committee of the Parliament may invite the Commission to present the evaluation results and answer questions raised by its members.

2.2.        Management and control system

2.2.1.     Risk(s) identified

An ex-ante evaluation has been carried out to accompany the proposal for the Decision. Specific recommendations resulting from this and from the interim evaluation of the ISA Programme have been duly taken into account. Certain risks identified in the recommendations are addressed thoroughly in the proposal.

The ISA2 Programme will develop and support the European Interoperability Cartography (EIC) as an instrument to map and analyse the interoperability landscape in Europe and to identify solutions that are available and those that are still lacking. On that basis, it will continue to support existing solutions, create new solutions and act as a facilitator for interoperability solutions resulting from other Union initiatives that could become operational in the Union’s digital service delivery channels. It will thus avoid duplication of effort, strengthen collaboration between Member States and Commission services, and actively promote the re-use of existing solutions.

2.2.2.     Information concerning the internal control system set-up

Existing control methods applied by the Commission will cover appropriations under the Programme.

2.2.3.     Estimate of the costs and benefits of the controls and assessment of the expected level of risk of error

A large number of financial and administrative control mechanisms are provided for. The Programme will be implemented through public procurement in accordance with the rules and procedures in the Financial Regulation.

2.3.        Measures to prevent fraud and irregularities

2.3.1.     Specify existing or envisaged prevention and protection measures

The rules and procedures of public procurement apply throughout the process; these include:

–        establishment of the work programme, subject to the opinion of the management committee, with milestones for the release of funding to ensure the controllability of achievements and costs;

–        appropriate drafting of tender specifications to ensure the controllability of achievement of the required results and of incurred costs;

–        qualitative and financial analysis of the tenders;

–        involvement of other Commission departments throughout the process;

–        verification of results and examination of invoices before payment, at several levels; and

–        internal audit.

3.           ESTIMATED FINANCIAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

3.1.        Heading(s) of the multiannual financial framework and expenditure budget line(s) affected

· Existing budget lines

In order of MFF headings and budget lines.

MFF heading || Budget line || Type of expenditure || Contribution

Number […][Heading ………………………………………...……….] || Diff./non-diff. ([67]) || from EFTA countries[68] || from candidate countries[69] || from third countries || within the meaning of Article 21(2)(b) of the Financial Regulation

1A || 26.01.04.01 Support expenditure for interoperability solutions for European public administrations || non-diff. || YES || YES || NO || NO

· New budget lines requested

In order of MFF headings and budget lines.

MFF heading || Budget line || Type of expenditure || Contribution

Number […][Heading ………………………………………...……….] || Diff./non-diff. || from EFTA countries || from candidate countries || from third countries || within the meaning of Article 21(2)(b) of the Financial Regulation

1A || 26.03.01.01 Interoperability solutions for European public administrations, businesses and citizens[70] (ISA2) || diff. || YES || YES || NO || NO

1A || 26.03.01.51 Completion of actions funded by Interoperability Solutions for European Public Administrations (ISA) || diff. || YES || YES || NO || NO

3.2.        Estimated impact on expenditure

3.2.1.     Summary of estimated impact on expenditure

EUR million (to three decimal places)

MFF heading || Number || 1A — Competitiveness for growth and jobs

DG: DIGIT || || || 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019 || 2020 || || || TOTAL

Ÿ Operational appropriations || || || || || || || ||

Number of budget line || Commitments || (1) || 24.448 || 25.115 || 25.783 || 26.452 || 27.130 || || || 128.928

Payments || (2) || 6.500 || 23.800 || 24.500 || 26.000 || 48.128 || || || 128.928

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of specific programmes[71] || || || || || || || ||

Number of budget line || || (3) || 0.400 || 0.400 || 0.400 || 0.400 || 0.400 || || || 2.000

TOTAL appropriations for DG DIGIT || Commitments || =1+1a +3 || 24.848 || 25.515 || 26.183 || 26.852 || 27.530 || || || 130.928

Payments || =2+2a +3 || 6.900 || 24.200 || 24.900 || 26.400 || 48.528 || || || 130.928

Ÿ TOTAL operational appropriations || Commitments || (4) || 24.848 || 25.515 || 26.183 || 26.852 || 27.530 || || || 130.928

Payments || (5) || 6.900 || 24.200 || 24.900 || 26.400 || 48.528 || || || 130.928

Ÿ TOTAL appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope for specific programmes || (6) || || || || || || || ||

TOTAL appropriations for MFF HEADING 1A || Commitments || =4+ 6 || 24.848 || 25.515 || 26.183 || 26.852 || 27.530 || || || 130.928

Payments || =5+ 6 || 6.900 || 24.200 || 24.900 || 26.400 || 48.528 || || || 130.928

MFF heading || 5 || Administrative expenditure

EUR million (to three decimal places)

|| || || 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019 || 2020 || || || TOTAL

DG: DIGIT ||

Ÿ Human resources || 2.416 || 2.416 || 2.416 || 2.416 || 2.416 || || || 12.080

Ÿ Other administrative expenditure || 0.120 || 0.120 || 0.120 || 0.120 || 0.120 || || || 0.600

TOTAL DG DIGIT || Appropriations || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || || || 12.680

TOTAL appropriations for MFF HEADING 5 || (Total commitments = Total payments) || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || || 12.680

EUR million (to three decimal places)

|| || || 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019 || 2020 || || || TOTAL

TOTAL appropriations under MFF HEADINGS 1 to 5 || Commitments || 27.384 || 28.051 || 28.719 || 29.388 || 30.066 || || || 143.608

Payments || 9.436 || 26.736 || 27.436 || 28.936 || 51.064 || || || 143.608

3.2.2.     Estimated impact on operational appropriations

– ¨  The proposal/initiative does not require the use of operational appropriations

– ü  The proposal/initiative requires the use of operational appropriations, as explained below:

Commitment appropriations in EUR million (to three decimal places)

Indicate objectives and outputs ò || || || 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019 || 2020 || || || TOTAL

OUTPUTS

Type[72] || Average cost || No || Cost || No || Cost || No || Cost || No || Cost || No || Cost || No || Cost || No || Cost || No total || Total cost

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE as per paragraph 1.4.1 and 1.4.4 || || || || || || || || || || || || || || || ||

Key interoperability enablers || || || || 6.000 || || 6.000 || || 6.000 || || 7.000 || || 7.000 || || || || || || 32.000

Support the effective implementation of EU legislation || || || || 10.000 || || 12.000 || || 12.000 || || 14.000 || || 14.000 || || || || || || 62.000

Supporting instruments for European public administrations || || || || 3.000 || || 3.500 || || 4.000 || || 4.500 || || 4.500 || || || || || || 19.500

Accompanying measures || || || || 2.550 || || 2.550 || || 2.550 || || 2.550 || || 2.550 || || || || || || 12.750

Monitoring activities || || || || 0.535 || || 0.535 || || 0.535 || || 0.535 || || 0.535 || || || || || || 2.675

TOTAL COST || || 22.094 || || 24.594 || || 25.094 || || 28.594 || || 28.594 || || || || || || 128.925

3.2.3.     Estimated impact on appropriations of an administrative nature

3.2.3.1.  Summary

– ¨  The proposal/initiative does not require the use of appropriations of an administrative nature

– ü  The proposal/initiative requires the use of appropriations of an administrative nature, as explained below:

EUR million (to three decimal places)

|| 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019 || 2020 || || || TOTAL

MFF HEADING 5 || || || || || || || ||

Human resources || 2.416 || 2.416 || 2.416 || 2.416 || 2.416 || || || 12.080

Other administrative expenditure || 0.120 || 0.120 || 0.120 || 0.120 || 0.120 || || || 0.600

Subtotal MFF HEADING 5 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || || || 12.680

Outside MFF HEADING 5[73] || || || || || || || ||

Human resources || || || || || || || ||

Other expenditure of an administrative nature || || || || || || || ||

Subtotal outside MFF HEADING 5 || || || || || || || ||

TOTAL || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || 2.536 || || || 12.680

The human resources appropriations required will be met by appropriations from the DG that are already assigned to management of the action and/or have been redeployed within the DG, together if necessary with any additional allocation which may be granted to the managing DG under the annual allocation procedure and in the light of budgetary constraints.

3.2.3.2.  Estimated requirements of human resources

– ¨  The proposal/initiative does not require the use of human resources.

– ü  The proposal/initiative requires the use of human resources, as explained below:

Estimate to be expressed in full time equivalent units

|| || 2016 || 2017 || 2018 || 2019 || 2020 || || || Total

|| Ÿ Establishment plan posts (officials and temporary staff) || ||

|| XX 01 01 01 (Headquarters and Commission’s Representation Offices) — AD || 10 || 10 || 10 || 10 || 10 || || || 10

|| XX 01 01 01 (Headquarters and Commission’s Representation Offices) — AST || 4 || 4 || 4 || 4 || 4 || || || 4

|| XX 01 01 01 (Headquarters and Commission’s Representation Offices) — AST/SC || 2 || 2 || 2 || 2 || 2 || || || 2

|| XX 01 01 02 (Delegations) || || || || || || || ||

|| XX 01 05 01 (Indirect research) || || || || || || || ||

|| 10 01 05 01 (Direct research) || || || || || || || ||

Ÿ External staff (in full-time equivalent unit: FTE)[74] ||

|| XX 01 02 01 (CA, SNE, INT from the ‘global envelope’) — SNE || 3 || 3 || 3 || 3 || 3 || || || 3

|| XX 01 02 01 (CA, SNE, INT from the ‘global envelope’) — CA || 1 || 1 || 1 || 1 || 1 || || || 1

|| XX 01 02 02 (CA, LA, SNE, INT and JED in the delegations) || || || || || || || ||

|| XX 01 04 yy[75] || - at Headquarters || || || || || || || ||

|| - Delegations || || || || || || || || ||

|| XX 01 05 02 (CA, SNE, INT — Indirect research) || || || || || || || ||

|| 10 01 05 02 (CA, INT, SNE — Direct research) || || || || || || || ||

|| Other budget lines (specify) || || || || || || || ||

|| TOTAL || 20 || 20 || 20 || 20 || 20 || || || 20

XX is the policy area or budget title concerned.

The human resources required will be met by staff from the DG who are already assigned to management of the action and/or have been redeployed within the DG, together if necessary with any additional allocation that may be granted to the managing DG under the annual allocation procedure and in the light of budgetary constraints.

Description of tasks to be carried out:

Officials and temporary staff || The AD posts cover the actual management of the Programme: elaboration of the work Programme, management of the budget, management of the public calls for tenders associated with the execution of the Programme, management of the contract associated with the execution of the Programme, follow-up of projects, contacts with Commission services and Member State experts, organisation of expert meetings, workshops and conferences. Also included is the head of unit. The AST and AST/SC posts provide support in the following areas: - Secretarial tasks, organisation of missions (2 persons); - Budget management, calls for tenders, contracts and payments of invoices (2 persons); - Information dissemination and communication (2 persons); - Logistics: organisation of meetings and workshops, invitations to experts, reimbursement of experts, document management (1 person).

External staff || The END posts support the actual management of the Programme, complementing the AD posts mainly in areas related to coordination with the Member States, the follow-up of projects and the organisation of expert meetings, workshops and conferences. The contractual staff will provide dedicated support for (a) the dissemination and exploitation activities of the Programme and (b) the actual management of specified actions mainly in areas involving other Commission services.

3.2.4.     Compatibility with the current multiannual financial framework

– ü  Proposal/initiative is compatible the current multiannual financial framework.

The proposal is compatible with the existing multiannual financial framework.

– ¨  Proposal/initiative will entail reprogramming of the relevant heading in the multiannual financial framework.

Explain what reprogramming is required, specifying the budget lines concerned and the corresponding amounts.

– ¨  Proposal/initiative requires application of the flexibility instrument or revision of the multiannual financial framework[76].

Explain what is required, specifying the headings and budget lines concerned and the corresponding amounts.

3.2.5.     Third-party contributions

– The proposal/initiative does not provide for co-financing by third parties.

3.3.        Estimated impact on revenue

– ü  Proposal/initiative has no financial impact on revenue.

– ¨  Proposal/initiative has the following financial impact:

¨         on own resources

¨         on miscellaneous revenue

EUR million (to three decimal places)

Budget revenue line: || Appropriations available for the current financial year || Impact of the proposal/initiative[77]

Year N || Year N+1 || Year N+2 || Year N+3 || Enter as many years as necessary to show the duration of the impact (see point 1.6)

Article …………. || || || || || || || ||

For miscellaneous ‘assigned’ revenue, specify the budget expenditure line(s) affected.

Specify the method for calculating the impact on revenue.

[1]               http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/innovation/policy/public-sector-innovation/index_en.htm.

[2]               Commission 2013 annual growth survey, COM(2012) 750 final, 28.11.2012.

[3]               European Interoperability Strategy 2012 Implementation Review, report on political, socio-economic and legal factors.

[4]               Commission Communication EUROPE 2020 A strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, COM(2010) 2020 final, 3.3.2010. .

[5]               A Digital Agenda for Europe, Commission Communication to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM(2010) 245 final, 28.8.2010. .

[6]               Towards interoperability for European public services, Commission Communication to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM(2010) 744 final, 16.12.2010. .

[7]               e‑Commission 2012-15: Delivering user-centric digital services, Communication from VP Šefčovič to the Commission, SEC(2012) 492 final, 1.8.2012.

[8]               Decision 922/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 September 2009 on interoperability solutions for European public administrations (ISA), OJ L 260, 3.10.2009, p. 20.

[9]               Regulation (EU) No 1291/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing Horizon 2020 — the Framework Programme for Research and Innovation 2014-2020 and repealing Decision No 1982/2006/EC (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 104).

[10]             Regulation (EU) No 1316/2013 1316/2013/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing the Connecting Europe Facility, amending Regulation (EU) No 913/2010 and repealing Regulations (EC) No 680/2007 and (EC) No 67/2010 (OJ L 348, 20.12.2013, p. 129).

[11]             Powering European Public Sector Innovation: Towards A New Architecture. Report of the Expert Group on Public Sector Innovation. EUR 13825 EN, 2013

[12]             Council Decision 95/468/EC of 6 November 1995 on a Community contribution for telematic interchange of data between administrations in the Community (IDA). OJ L269. 11.11.1995, p.23-25

[13]             Decision 1719/1999/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 July 1999 on a series of guidelines, including the identification of projects of common interest, for trans-European networks for the electronic interchange of data between administrations (IDA). OJ L 203, 3.8.1999, p. 1.

[14]             Decision 1720/1999/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 12 July 1999 a series of actions and measures in order to ensure interoperability of and access to trans-European networks for the electronic interchange of data between administrations (IDA). OJ L 203, 3.8.1999, p. 9.

[15]             Decision 2004/387/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 on interoperable delivery of pan-European eGovernment services to public administrations, businesses and citizens (IDABC), OJ L 181, 18.5.2004, p. 25.

[16]             Decision 922/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 September 2009 on interoperability solutions for European public administrations (ISA), OJ L 260, 3.10.2009, p. 20.

[17]             Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions ‘Unleashing the Potential of Cloud Computing in Europe’. COM(2012) 529.

[18]             Directive 2006/123/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2006 on services in the internal market, OJ L 376, 27.12.2006, p. 36.

[19]             Directive 2012/17/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 June 2012 amending Council Directive 89/666/EEC and Directives 2005/56/EC and 2009/101/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the interconnection of central, commercial and companies registers.

[20]             Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 March 2007 establishing an Infrastructure for Spatial Information in the European Community (INSPIRE). OJ L 108, 25.4.2007, p. 1.

[21]             Decision No 1482/2007/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2007 establishing a Community programme to improve the operation of taxation systems in the internal market (Fiscalis 2013) and repealing Decision No 2235/2002/EC. OJ L 330, 15/12/2007, p. 1–7.

[22]             Decision No 624/2007/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 May 2007 establishing an action programme for customs in the Community (Customs 2013). OJ L 154, 14/06/2007, p. 25–31.

[23]             Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 laying down common provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and laying down general provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 1083/2006, OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 320

[24]             Directive 2013/37/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 amending Directive 2003/98/EC on the re-use of public sector information, OJ L 175, 27.6.2013, p. 1.

[25]             Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on electronic identification and trust services for electronic transactions in the internal market, COM(2012) 238 final, 4.6.2012.

[26]             Regulation (EU) No 1025/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on European standardisation, amending Council Directives 89/686/EEC and 93/15/EEC and Directives 94/9/EC, 94/25/EC, 95/16/EC, 97/23/EC, 98/34/EC, 2004/22/EC, 2007/23/EC, 2009/23/EC and 2009/105/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and repealing Council Decision 87/95/EEC and Decision No 1673/2006/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, OJ L 316, 14.11.2012, p. 12.

[27]             Regulation (EC) No 223/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 March 2009 on European statistics and repealing Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1101/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the transmission of data subject to statistical confidentiality to the Statistical Office of the European Communities, Council Regulation (EC) No 322/97 on Community Statistics, and Council Decision 89/382/EEC, Euratom establishing a Committee on the Statistical Programmes of the European Communities. OJ L87, 31.3.2009, p.164-173

[28]             Communication from the Commission to the European parliament and the Council on the production method of EU statistics: a vision for the next decade. COM(2009) 404 final, 10.8.2009

[29]             Directive 2014/55/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 on electronic invoicing in public procurement. OJ L 133, 6.5.2014, p. 1-11

[30]             Interim evaluation of the ISA programme, Kurt Salmon, 31.10.2012.

[31]             SG, COMP, MARE, JRC, PO, DGT, EMPL, REGIO, HOME, JUST, ENTR, CNECT.

[32]             Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Malta, the Netherlands, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

[33]               OJ C , , p.

[34]               OJ C , , p. .

[35]               COM(2010) 245.

[36]               COM(2010) 2020.

[37]               COM(2010) 744.

[38]               Directive 2006/123/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2006 on services in the internal market. OJ L 376, 27.12.2006, p. 36.

[39]               Directive 2012/17/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 June 2012 amending Council Directive 89/666/EEC and Directives 2005/56/EC and 2009/101/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the interconnection of central, commercial and companies registers.

[40]               Directive 2007/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 March 2007 establishing an Infrastructure for Spatial Information in the European Community (INSPIRE). OJ L 108, 25.4.2007, p. 1.

[41]               Regulation (EC) No 767/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 July 2008 concerning the Visa Information System (VIS) and the exchange of data between Member States on short-stay visas (VIS Regulation). OJ L 218, 13.8.2008, p. 60–81.

[42]             Regulation (EC) No 1987/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006 on the establishment, operation and use of the second-generation Schengen Information System (SIS II). OJ L 381, 28.12.2006, p. 4–23.

[43]             Council Regulation No 2725/2000 of 11 December 2000 concerning the establishment of ‘Eurodac’ for the comparison of fingerprints for the effective application of the Dublin Convention. OJ L 316, 15.12.2000, p. 1–10.

[44]             https://e-justice.europa.eu

[45]             Directive 2011/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 2011 on the application of patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare. OJ L 88, 4.4.2011, p. 45-65.

[46]             Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 laying down common provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and laying down general provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 1083/2006 . OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 320.

[47]             Directive 2013/37/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 amending Directive 2003/98/EC on the re-use of public sector information. OJ L 175, 27.6.2013, p. 1.

[48]             COM(2012) 238. OJ C [..], [..], p.[..]

[49]             Regulation (EU) No 1025/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on European standardisation, amending Council Directives 89/686/EEC and 93/15/EEC and Directives 94/9/EC, 94/25/EC, 95/16/EC, 97/23/EC, 98/34/EC, 2004/22/EC, 2007/23/EC, 2009/23/EC and 2009/105/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and repealing Council Decision 87/95/EEC and Decision No 1673/2006/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council. OJ L 316, 14.11.2012, p. 12.

[50]             Regulation (EU) No 1291/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing Horizon 2020 — the Framework Programme for Research and Innovation 2014-2020 and repealing Decision No 1982/2006/EC. OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 104.

[51]             Directive 2014/25/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on procurement by entities operating in the water, energy, transport and postal services sectors and repealing Directive 2004/17/EC. OJ L 94, 28.3.2014, p243.

[52]             Directive 2014/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on public procurement and repealing Directive 2004/18/EC. OJ L 94, 28.3/.014, p65-242.

[53]             Directive 2014/23/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the award of concession contracts. OJ L 94, 28.3.2014, p1-64.

[54]             Directive 2014/55/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014 on electronic invoicing in public procurement. OJ L 133, 6.5.2014, p. 1.

[55]             Regulation (EU) No 1316/2013/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing the Connecting Europe Facility, amending Regulation (EU) No 913/2010 and repealing Regulations (EC) No 680/2007 and (EC) No 67/2010. OJ L 348, 20.12.2013, p. 129.

[56]             Regulation (EU) No 283/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 march 2014 on guidelines for trans-European networks in the area of telecommunications infrastructure and repealing Decision No 1336/97/EC. OJ L 86, 21.3.2014, p.14.

[57]             Decision 1719/1999/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 July 1999 on a series of guidelines, including the identification of projects of common interest, for trans-European networks for the electronic interchange of data between administrations (IDA). OJ L 203, 3.8.1999, p. 1.

[58]             Decision 1720/1999.EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 12 July 1999 a series of actions and measures in order to ensure interoperability of and access to trans-European networks for the electronic interchange of data between administrations (IDA). OJ L 203, 3.8.1999, p. 9.

[59]             Decision 2004/387/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 April 2004 on interoperable delivery of pan-European eGovernment services to public administrations, businesses and citizens. OJ L 144, 30.4.2004, p. 62 and OJ L 181, 18.5.2004, p. 25 (Corrigendum).

[60]             Decision No 922/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 September 2009 on interoperability solutions for European public administrations (ISA). OJ L 260, 3.10.2009, p. 20.

[61]             Document A7-0083/2012.

[62]             Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management. OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1-11

[63]             Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 2011 laying down the rules and general principles concerning mechanisms for control by Member States of the Commission’s exercise of implementing powers.                OJ L 55, 28.12.2011, p. 13.

[64]               ABM: activity-based management; ABB: activity-based budgeting.

[65]               As referred to in Article 54(2)(a) or (b) of the Financial Regulation.

[66]               Details of management modes and references to the Financial Regulation may be found on the BudgWeb site: http://www.cc.cec/budg/man/budgmanag/budgmanag_en.html.

[67]               Diff. = differentiated appropriations; non-diff. = non-differentiated appropriations.

[68]               EFTA: European Free Trade Association. .

[69]               Candidate countries and, where applicable, potential candidate countries in the Western Balkans.

[70]               This new budgetary item will replace current budget line 26 03 01 01: Interoperability solutions for European Public Administrations (ISA). Completion of ISA actions will be covered by item 26 03 01 02: Completion ….

[71]               Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.

[72]               Outputs are products and services to be supplied (e.g. number of student exchanges financed, number of km of roads built, etc.).

[73]               Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.

[74]               CA= Contract Staff; LA = Local Staff; SNE= Seconded National Expert; INT = agency staff; JED= Junior Experts in Delegations). .

[75]               Sub-ceiling for external staff covered by operational appropriations (former ‘BA’ lines).

[76]               See points 19 and 24 of the Interinstitutional Agreement (for 2007-13).

[77]               As regards traditional own resources (customs duties, sugar levies), the amounts indicated must be net amounts, i.e. gross amounts after deduction of 25 % for collection costs.

Top