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Document 52012XC0205(05)

Publication of an application pursuant to Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs

OJ C 33, 5.2.2013, p. 10–14 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

5.2.2013   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 33/10


Publication of an application pursuant to Article 50(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs

2013/C 33/06

This publication confers the right to object to the application pursuant to Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council (1).

SINGLE DOCUMENT

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 510/2006

on the protection of geographical indications and designations of origin for agricultural products and foodstuffs  (2)

‘POULET DES CÉVENNES’/‘CHAPON DES CÉVENNES’

EC No: FR-PGI-0005-0862-22.02.2011

PGI ( X ) PDO ( )

1.   Name:

‘Poulet des Cévennes’/‘Chapon des Cévennes’

2.   Member State or third country:

France

3.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff:

3.1.   Type of product:

Class 1.1.

Fresh meat (and offal)

3.2.   Description of product to which the name in point 1 applies:

The ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ PGI has the following characteristics:

The strains: the group uses the S 757 N, T 457 N and T 451 hybrids. These hybrids are listed in the register of currently recognised, slow-growing hybrid strains.

The carcasses have a specific appearance:

 

Class A (as defined in Regulation (EC) No 543/2008).

 

General: no marked dissymmetry of the carcass.

 

Bones: no necrosis, no red diaphysis.

 

Skin:

no scratches: downgraded systematically if there are visible scratches on the breast or thighs; scratches are tolerated on other parts of the body,

burns: downgraded systematically if there are visible burns on the breast or thighs; burns are tolerated on other parts of the body,

absence of residual feathers and stubs,

breastbone: downgraded systematically if the skin on the breastbone is torn,

bleeding: downgraded systematically if the joints of the extremities are red or if there are contusions,

roped poultry: clean head and feet, no necrosis.

The minimum weights of the carcasses:

 

for chickens:

1 kg when presented ‘eviscerated without giblets’, oven-ready,

1,3 kg when presented ‘roped’;

 

for capons:

2,5 kg when presented ‘eviscerated without giblets’, oven-ready,

2,9 kg when presented ‘roped’.

‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ are characterised by firm flesh and muscles, which are much appreciated, especially as the meat is juicy and lean.

‘Poulets des Cévennes’ are sold as fresh whole carcasses, oven-ready (eviscerated without giblets), roped or cut.

‘Chapons des Cévennes’ are sold as fresh whole carcasses, oven-ready or roped.

3.3.   Raw materials (for processed products only):

3.4.   Feed (for products of animal origin only):

‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ have access to a stony run planted with grass and trees at the latest when they are 42 days old.

The natural feed is based on three cereals and contains no flour or animal fat. It is supplemented with vegetable proteins (soy bean, rape seed, sunflower seed), minerals and vitamins.

In the production of ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ the feeding of the poultry consists of three phases for the chickens and four phases for the capons:

Cereal incorporation rates by feeding phase, for chickens

In the initial phase: from day 1 to 28 max:

A minimum of 50 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula.

In the growth phase: from day 29 to day 52:

A minimum of 70 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula

(a minimum of 2 cereals).

In the final phase: from day 53 to slaughtering:

A minimum of 80 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula

(a minimum of 3 cereals).

Cereal incorporation rates by feeding phase, for capons

In the initial phase: from day 1 to 28 max:

A minimum of 50 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula.

In the growth phase: from day 29 to day 52:

A minimum of 70 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula

(a minimum of 2 cereals).

In the final phase: from day 53 to slaughtering:

A minimum of 70 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula

(a minimum of 3 cereals).

In the slaughtering phase: 4 weeks before slaughtering:

A minimum of 80 % of cereals and cereal by-products in weight of the feed formula

(a minimum of 3 cereals).

3.5.   Specific steps in production that must take place in the defined geographical area:

The chickens and capons are reared in the geographical area of the PGI.

The chicks arrive to the breeders’ at the age of one day. The rearing period is 84 days for chickens and a minimum of 150 days for capons.

3.6.   Specific rules on slicing, grating, packaging, etc.:

3.7.   Specific rules concerning labelling:

The following must appear on the labels:

the name of the PGI:

‘Poulet des Cévennes’,

or

‘Chapon des Cévennes’,

the slaughterhouse is identified either on the information label (EEC stamp) or on the weight/price label affixed to the packaging next to the information label.

4.   Concise definition of the geographical area:

The geographical area is defined according to a combination of several basic criteria: the long-standing nature and the reputation of the production, local know-how, historical and current economic realities and ecological factors.

The geographical area of the ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ PGI consists of 426 municipalities in the following 4 departments:

The department of Ardèche

The cantons of: Bourg-Saint-Andéol, Joyeuse, Largentière, Valgorge, Vallon-Pont-d'Arc, Les Vans, Viviers.

Part of the canton of: Villeneuve-de-Berg.

The municipalities of: Vogue, Villeneuve de Berg, Saint-Maurice-d'Ibie, Saint-Maurice-d'Ardèche, Saint-Germain, Saint-Andéol-de-Berg, Rochecolombe, Lavilledieu, Lanas.

The department of Gard

The cantons of: Alès-Nord-Est, Alès-Ouest, Alès-Sud-Est, Alzon, Anduze, Bagnols-sur-Cèze, Barjac, Bessèges, Génolhac, La Grand-Combe, Lasalle, Lédignan, Lussan, Marguerittes, Pont-Saint-Esprit, Quissac, Saint-Ambroix, Saint-André-de-Valborgne, Saint-Chaptes, Saint-Hippolyte-du-Fort, Saint-Jean-du-Gard, Saint-Mamert-du-Gard, Sauve, Sumène, Trèves, Uzès, Valleraugue, Vézénobres, Le Vigan.

The department of Hérault

The cantons of: Claret, Ganges.

The department of Lozère

The cantons of: Barre-des-Cévennes, Florac, Meyrueis, Le Pont-de-Montvert, Saint-Germain-de-Calberte, Villefort.

5.   Link with the geographical area:

5.1.   Specificity of the geographical area:

The geographical area of the ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ PGI is characterised by:

A dramatic landscape

The steep, sloped and hilly Cévenol landscape is characterised by its dramatic contours.

The topography of the Cévennes varies between 200 and 1 700 metres in altitude and the contours vary throughout this area.

Three natural regions can be clearly distinguished: the Hautes Cévennes, rising above the Basses Cévennes in the east, and the high plains divided by gorges, forming the Causses and the Gorges.

Hence, deep and embedded valleys ranging in altitude from 250 to 1 000 metres extend between the Bougès and Aigoual massifs. As the Gardon rivers run down an uneven relief over a distance of nearly 1 400 metres, between highland springs and the Alès basin, they erode the slopes and create countless, deep ravines. These are called ‘vallats’.

The clay-limestone, occasionally slaty, soils of the Cévenol region are arid soils that are difficult to cultivate and exceptionally rocky.

Climatic contrasts

There is a strong contrast between the valleys of the Gardon rivers, which enjoy a hot climate, with severe drought in the summer and plenty of sunshine, and the harsh climate on the slopes of Mont Lozère (over 90 days of frost a year).

The differences from one season to another are particularly marked. Above all, this is a region where Mediterranean showers are common, and they are accentuated by the intensity of the relief: widespread rainfall or violent individual storms that are frequent from September to May, especially in the autumn, and less so in the winter.

Summers, on the other hand, are very dry. During the winter, snow is present above 800 metres, but the thickness and duration of its cover vary greatly.

This results in a variety of highly differentiated climates over an area of just a few kilometres.

Special vegetation cover

The nature of the soils, the diversity of the climate and the variety of landscapes contribute to the diverse vegetation in Cévenole.

Mont Lozère is characterised by an absence of trees. All is but grassland or heath: blueberry heath, heather heath and broom heath.

The first trees are found a little lower down: beeches, firs and pines.

As you move still farther down the slope, you encounter oaks and chestnuts.

The jagged ridges (‘serres’) and valleys of the Cévennes are the most diverse. On the highest point they are covered in heath, with shades varying from the saffron yellow of the broom to the lavender of the heather. Further down you pass by a chestnut grove and reach a forest of green oaks, which gives the distinct impression that brushwood is growing all the way up in the mountains.

Know-how adapted to the environment

Breeders take special care of the runs. They plant trees after observing ‘what grows nearby’. This is a sensible approach, as it means that trees not adapted to the soil and climate of the Cèvenol region are not planted on the runs.

Breeders have also gained extensive know-how in feeding by preparing feeding plans that take into account the different growth phases of the poultry. The poultry feed consists of at least three cereals, including maize. The method is also characterised by a continuous increase in the share of cereals, which reaches a minimum of 80 % during the final phase.

Good maintenance of the runs is another element of this know-how. It allows the poultry to receive complementary feeding in the form of local plant varieties (aromatic herbs, heather, tree seedlings or berries) and natural grit that is composed of stones from the breakdown of Cévenoles rocks and that promotes the development of the gizzard and thereby the efficient crushing and better digestion of the feed.

5.2.   Specificity of the product:

The ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ PGI is characterised by the gustatory quality of the product, the yellow coloration of the chickens, the firm flesh and muscles and meat that is juicy and lean. This PGI has built its reputation over several decades.

5.3.   Causal link between the geographical area and the quality or characteristics of the product (for PDO) or a specific quality, the reputation or other characteristic of the product (for PGI):

The link is based on the reputation and the know-how of the breeders, who fashion the end product in order to highlight all the specific features related to its production territory.

The production of Cévennes poultry is adapted to the physical constraints of the natural environment. Generations of breeders have developed a true know-how in this type of production.

The feed, consisting of at least three cereals, contributes to the gustatory quality of the product (firm, juicy and lean flesh), while the use of maize and sorghum are a natural source of colour of the yellow chickens. The complementary feed found naturally in the area (aromatic herbs, tree seedlings, berries, insects, etc.) helps make the flesh even tastier.

‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ derive from the cou-nu strain, which has long legs. This characteristic, which is indispensable in order for the poultry to be able to move around on uneven ground without hurting itself, allows it to enjoy to the full all the advantages of the run. The special run also affects the muscles of ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ and is reflected in the organoleptic characteristics of the product: firm flesh and muscles and lean meat.

Finally, the presence of poultry in the Cévennes contributes to the maintenance of established farming communities impoverished by the disappearance of mines and industry.

In other words, the ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ PGI is poultry production that is adapted to its natural environment, which in turn influences the special qualities of the product.

In addition, the ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ PGI enjoys a long-standing reputation, as evidenced by the many poultry and agricultural shows, which, starting around 1900, have recognised the quality of Cévennes poultry by awarding it first prize. It should be noted that already in those days, in addition to family-owned farmyards and poultry yards, there were a few specialised holdings engaged in small-scale production intended for sale on the market.

Today ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ and ‘Chapon des Cévennes’ feature in numerous articles in the regional and national press. They are included in all activities promoting good-quality products from the Languedoc-Roussillon region, such as ‘Militant du goût’ or ‘La qualité fait sa comédie’, which takes place annually in Montpellier and is aimed at the public at large.

The numerous prizes, for example the bronze medal awarded to ‘Poulet des Cévennes’ at the Concours Général Agricole du Salon International de l’Agriculture de Paris in 2009, are further proof of the present reputation of this product.

Reference to publication of the specification:

(Article 5(7) of Regulation (EC) No 510/2006)

https://www.inao.gouv.fr/fichier/CDCIGPPouletChaponDesCevennesV2.pdf


(1)  OJ L 343, 14.12.2012, p. 1.

(2)  OJ L 93, 31.3.2006, p. 12. Replaced by Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 November 2012 on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs.


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