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Document 52023XC01453

Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector, as referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

PUB/2023/1574

OJ C, C/2023/1453, 06.12.2023, ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/C/2023/1453/oj (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, GA, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/C/2023/1453/oj

European flag

Official Journal
of the European Union

EN

Series C


C/2023/1453

6.12.2023

Publication of a communication of approval of a standard amendment to a product specification for a name in the wine sector, as referred to in Article 17(2) and (3) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33

(C/2023/1453)

This communication is published in accordance with Article 17(5) of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2019/33 (1).

COMMUNICATING THE APPROVAL OF A STANDARD AMENDMENT

‘Bordeaux’

PDO-FR-A0821-AM08

Date of communication: 5 September 2023

DESCRIPTION OF AND REASONS FOR THE APPROVED AMENDMENT

1.   Official Geographic Code

The reference to the Official Geographic Code has been amended as regards the list of municipalities in the geographical area and the area in immediate proximity.

The area itself remains unchanged.

Points 6 and 9 of the single document have been amended.

2.   Vine varieties

The list of secondary varieties has been amended to include varieties of interest for the purposes of adaptation.

Limits have also been set on the proportion of these varieties at the vineyard and in the blending process for batches of wine intended for marketing.

The document [sic] is not affected by this amendment.

SINGLE DOCUMENT

1.   Name of the product

Bordeaux

2.   Geographical indication type

PDO – Protected designation of origin

3.   Categories of grapevine product

1.

Wine

4.   Description of the wine(s)

1.   Still dry white wines

BRIEF WRITTEN DESCRIPTION

The still dry white wines have:

a minimum natural alcoholic strength by volume of 10 %;

a fermentable sugar content of ≤ 3 g/l. This may be increased to 5 g/l if total acidity is ≥ 2,7 g/l H2SO4.

After enrichment, the total alcoholic strength by volume is ≤ 13 %.

Prior to packaging, they have:

a volatile acidity of ≤ 13,26 meq/l;

a total SO2 content of ≤ 180 mg/l.

The other analytical standards comply with EU rules.

Dry white wines made from the Sauvignon B variety have very aromatic, fresh and fruity floral and citrus notes. Sémillon B provides body and richness and Muscadelle B adds floral aromas. In blends, the secondary varieties bring out acidity and citrus notes. These thirst-quenching wines are very suitable for early consumption (1 or 2 years).

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum total acidity

in milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

18

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

200

2.   Still white wines with residual sugars

BRIEF WRITTEN DESCRIPTION

The still white wines with fermentable sugars have:

a minimum natural alcoholic strength by volume of 10,5 %;

a fermentable sugar content of > 5 g/l and ≤ 60 g/l.

After enrichment, the total alcoholic strength by volume is ≤ 13,5 %.

Prior to packaging, they have:

a volatile acidity of ≤ 13,26 meq/l;

a total SO2 content of ≤ 250 mg/l.

The other analytical standards comply with EU rules.

The white wines with fermentable sugars are based around the Sémillon B variety, which gives round, generous wines with a golden colour and aromas of candied fruit, sometimes blended with Sauvignon B to add freshness. The wines can be aged for a few years or enjoyed young.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10

Minimum total acidity

in milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

18

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

250

3.   Still rosé wines

BRIEF WRITTEN DESCRIPTION

The still rosé wines have:

a minimum natural alcoholic strength by volume of 10 %;

a fermentable sugar content of ≤ 3 g/l. This may be increased to 5 g/l if total acidity is ≥ 2,7 g/l H2SO4;

a modified colour intensity (OD 420 + OD 520 + OD 620) of ≤ 1,1.

After enrichment, the total alcoholic strength by volume is ≤ 13 %.

Prior to packaging, they have:

a volatile acidity of ≤ 13,26 meq/l;

a total SO2 content of ≤ 180 mg/l.

The other analytical standards comply with EU rules.

The rosé wines have a colour that ranges from pale pink to a more intense pink according to the technique used (direct pressing, light maceration or bleeding/draining) and a range of fruity or floral aromas underpinned by a balanced structure combining roundness and liveliness. They are full-bodied in the mouth. These wines are suitable for early consumption (1 or 2 years).

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum total acidity

in milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

18

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

200

4.   Still red wines

BRIEF WRITTEN DESCRIPTION

The still red wines have:

a minimum natural alcoholic strength by volume of 10,5 %;

a fermentable sugar content of ≤ 3 g/l;

a malic acid content of ≤ 0,3 g/l.

After enrichment, the total alcoholic strength by volume is ≤ 13,5 %.

Prior to packaging, they have:

a volatile acidity of ≤ 13,26 meq/l;

a total SO2 content of ≤ 140 mg/l.

The other analytical standards comply with EU rules.

The red wines, in which Merlot N is often the predominant variety, are supple, fruity and not very acidic. In years of good ripeness, freshness can be added through the acidity of the Petit Verdot N and Cot N varieties. However, the main combination is Merlot N with Cabernet Sauvignon N and, to a lesser extent, Cabernet Franc N, both of which give the wines an aromatic complexity and a tannic power that allows them to maintain and develop their bouquet.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum total acidity

in milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

20

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

150

5.   Wine-making practices

5.1.    Specific oenological practices

1.   Planting density – spacing

Cultivation method

The minimum planting density of the vines is 4 000 plants per hectare (for parcels planted as from 1 August 2008). The spacing between vine rows must not exceed 2,50 metres, and the spacing between plants in the same row must be at least 0,85 metres. This density may be reduced to 3 300 plants per hectare. In that case, the spacing between vine rows must not exceed 3 metres, and the spacing between plants in the same row must be at least 0,85 metres.

2.   Pruning rules

Cultivation method

Only spur pruning and cane pruning are allowed. For the Merlot N, Sémillon B and Muscadelle B grape varieties, the number of buds when pruning must not exceed 45 000 per hectare and 18 per plant. For the other varieties, including Cabernet Franc N, Cabernet Sauvignon N, Sauvignon B and Sauvignon Gris G, the number of buds when pruning must not exceed 50 000 per hectare and 20 per plant. After debudding, the number of fruit-bearing branches per plant must not exceed:

for the Merlot N, Sémillon B and Muscadelle B grape varieties, 12 branches per plant if the vine planting density is 4 000 plants per hectare or more, and 15 branches per plant if the vine planting density is less than 4 000 plants per hectare;

for the other varieties, including Cabernet Franc N, Cabernet Sauvignon N, Sauvignon B and Sauvignon Gris G, 14 branches per plant if the vine planting density is 4 000 plants per hectare or more, and 17 branches per plant if the vine planting density is less than 4 000 plants per hectare. Pruning is carried out at the unfolded leaves stage (Lorenz stage 9) at the latest. Debudding is carried out prior to fruit setting.

3.

Specific oenological practice

The use of oenological charcoal is permitted for musts in the production of rosé wines other than those eligible to use the indication ‘clairet’, in a proportion not exceeding 20 % of the volume of rosé wine produced by the winemaker concerned, for the harvest in question.

4.   Enrichment

Specific oenological practice

Enrichment by partial concentration is permitted for the red wines, subject to a 15 % concentration limit for the volumes enriched using this method. After enrichment, the wines’ total alcoholic strength by volume must not exceed:

13,5 % in the case of red wines and white wines with fermentable sugars;

13 % in the case of rosé and dry white wines.

5.2.    Maximum yields

1.

Still white wines (dry and with fermentable sugars)

77 hectolitres per hectare

2.

Still rosé wines

72 hectolitres per hectare

3.

Still red wines – vine planting density ≥ 4 000 plants/ha

68 hectolitres per hectare

4.

Still red wines – vine planting density < 4 000 plants/ha

64 hectolitres per hectare

6.   Demarcated geographical area

The grapes are harvested and the wines made, developed and aged on the territory of the following municipalities in the department of Gironde, on the basis of the Official Geographic Code in force on 1 January 2022:

Abzac, Aillas, Ambarès-et-Lagrave, Ambès, Anglade, Arbanats, Arcins, Arsac, Artigues-près-Bordeaux, Arveyres, Asques, Aubiac, Auriolles, Auros, Avensan, Ayguemorte-les-Graves, Bagas, Baigneaux, Barie, Baron, Barsac, Bassanne, Bassens, Baurech, Bayas, Bayon-sur-Gironde, Bazas, Beautiran, Bégadan, Bègles, Béguey, Bellebat, Bellefond, Belvès-de-Castillon, Bernos-Beaulac, Berson, Berthez, Beychac-et-Caillau, Bieujac, Birac, Blaignac, Blaignan-Prignac, Blanquefort, Blasimon, Blaye, Blésignac, Bommes, Bonnetan, Bonzac, Bordeaux, Bossugan, Bouliac, Bourdelles, Bourg, Branne, Brannens, Braud-et-Saint-Louis, Brouqueyran, Bruges, Budos, Cabanac-et-Villagrains, Cabara, Cadarsac, Cadaujac, Cadillac, Cadillac-en-Fronsadais, Camarsac, Cambes, Camblanes-et-Meynac, Camiac-et-Saint-Denis, Camiran, Camps-sur-l’Isle, Campugnan, Canéjan, Capian, Caplong, Carbon-Blanc, Cardan, Carignan-de-Bordeaux, Cars, Cartelègue, Casseuil, Castelmoron-d’Albret, Castelnau-de-Médoc, Castelviel, Castets et Castillon, Castillon-la-Bataille, Castres-Gironde, Caudrot, Caumont, Cauvignac, Cavignac, Cazats, Cazaugitat, Cénac, Cenon, Cérons, Cessac, Cestas, Cézac, Chamadelle, Cissac-Médoc, Civrac-de-Blaye, Civrac-sur-Dordogne, Civrac-en-Médoc, Cleyrac, Coimères, Coirac, Comps, Coubeyrac, Couquèques, Courpiac, Cours-de-Monségur, Cours-les-Bains, Coutras, Coutures, Créon, Croignon, Cubnezais, Cubzac-les-Ponts, Cudos, Cursan, Cussac-Fort-Médoc, Daignac, Dardenac, Daubèze, Dieulivol, Donnezac, Donzac, Doulezon, Escoussans, Espiet, Etauliers, Eynesse, Eyrans, Eysines, Faleyras, Fargues, Fargues-Saint-Hilaire, Flaujagues, Floirac, Floudès, Fontet, Fossés-et-Baleyssac, Fours, Francs, Fronsac, Frontenac, Gabarnac, Gaillan-en-Médoc, Gajac, Galgon, Gans, Gardegan-et-Tourtirac, Gauriac, Gauriaguet, Générac, Génissac, Gensac, Gironde-sur-Dropt, Gornac, Gours, Gradignan, Grayan-et-l’Hôpital, Grézillac, Grignols, Guillac, Guillos, Guîtres, Haux, Hure, Illats, Isle-Saint-Georges, Izon, Jau-Dignac-et-Loirac, Jugazan, Juillac, La Brède, La Lande-de-Fronsac, La Réole, La Rivière, La Roquille, La Sauve, Labarde, Labescau, Ladaux, Lados, Lagorce, Lalande-de-Pomerol, Lamarque, Lamothe-Landerron, Landerrouat, Landerrouet-sur-Ségur, Landiras, Langoiran, Langon, Lansac, Lapouyade, Laroque, Laruscade, Latresne, Lavazan, Le Bouscat, Le Fieu, Le Haillan, Le Nizan, Le Pian-Médoc, Le Pian-sur-Garonne, Le Pout, Le Puy, Le Taillan-Médoc, Le Tourne, Le Verdon-sur-Mer, Léogeats, Léognan, Les Artigues-de-Lussac, Les Billaux, Les Eglisottes-et-Chalaures, Les Esseintes, Les Lèves-et-Thoumeyragues, Les Peintures, Les Salles, Lesparre-Médoc, Lestiac-sur-Garonne, Libourne, Lignan-de-Bazas, Lignan-de-Bordeaux, Ligueux, Listrac-de-Durèze, Listrac-Médoc, Lormont, Loubens, Loupes, Loupiac, Loupiac-de-la-Réole, Ludon-Médoc, Lugaignac, Lugasson, Lugon-et-l’Ile-du-Carnay, Lussac, Macau, Madirac, Maransin, Marcenais, Margaux-Cantenac, Margueron, Marimbault, Marions, Marsas, Martignas-sur-Jalle, Martillac, Martres, Masseilles, Massugas, Mauriac, Mazères, Mazion, Mérignac, Mérignas, Mesterrieux, Mombrier, Mongauzy, Monprimblanc, Monségur, Montagne, Montagoudin, Montignac, Montussan, Morizès, Mouillac, Mouliets-et-Villemartin, Moulis-en-Médoc, Moulon, Mourens, Naujac-sur-Mer, Naujan-et-Postiac, Néac, Nérigean, Neuffons, Noaillac, Noaillan, Omet, Ordonnac, Paillet, Parempuyre, Pauillac, Pellegrue, Périssac, Pessac, Pessac-sur-Dordogne, Petit-Palais-et-Cornemps, Peujard, Pineuilh, Plassac, Pleine-Selve, Podensac, Pomerol, Pompéjac, Pompignac, Pondaurat, Porchères, Porte-de-Benauge, Portets, Préchac, Preignac, Prignac-et-Marcamps, Pugnac, Puisseguin, Pujols, Pujols-sur-Ciron, Puybarban, Puynormand, Queyrac, Quinsac, Rauzan, Reignac, Rimons, Riocaud, Rions, Roaillan, Romagne, Roquebrune, Ruch, Sablons, Sadirac, Saillans, Saint-Aignan, Saint-André-de-Cubzac, Saint-André-du-Bois, Saint-André-et-Appelles, Saint-Androny, Saint-Antoine-du-Queyret, Saint-Antoine-sur-l’Isle, Saint-Aubin-de-Blaye, Saint-Aubin-de-Branne, Saint-Aubin-de-Médoc, Saint-Avit-de-Soulège, Saint-Avit-Saint-Nazaire, Saint-Brice, Saint-Caprais-de-Bordeaux, Saint-Christoly-de-Blaye, Saint-Christoly-Médoc, Saint-Christophe-de-Double, Saint-Christophe-des-Bardes, Saint-Cibard, Saint-Ciers-d’Abzac, Saint-Ciers-de-Canesse, Saint-Ciers-sur-Gironde, Sainte-Colombe, Saint-Côme, Sainte-Croix-du-Mont, Saint-Denis-de-Pile, Saint-Emilion, Saint-Estèphe, Saint-Etienne-de-Lisse, Sainte-Eulalie, Saint-Exupéry, Saint-Félix-de-Foncaude, Saint-Ferme, Sainte-Florence, Sainte-Foy-la-Grande, Sainte-Foy-la-Longue, Sainte-Gemme, Saint-Genès-de-Blaye, Saint-Genès-de-Castillon, Saint-Genès-de-Fronsac, Saint-Genès-de-Lombaud, Saint-Genis-du-Bois, Saint-Germain-de-Grave, Saint-Germain-de-la-Rivière, Saint-Germain-d’Esteuil, Saint-Germain-du-Puch, Saint-Gervais, Saint-Girons-d’Aiguevives, Sainte-Hélène, Saint-Hilaire-de-la-Noaille, Saint-Hilaire-du-Bois, Saint-Hippolyte, Saint-Jean-de-Blaignac, Saint-Jean-d’Illac, Saint-Julien-Beychevelle, Saint-Laurent-d’Arce, Saint-Laurent-des-Combes, Saint-Laurent-du-Bois, Saint-Laurent-du-Plan, Saint-Laurent-Médoc, Saint-Léon, Saint-Loubert, Saint-Loubès, Saint-Louis-de-Montferrand, Saint-Macaire, Saint-Magne-de-Castillon, Saint-Maixant, Saint-Mariens, Saint-Martial, Saint-Martin-de-Laye, Saint-Martin-de-Lerm, Saint-Martin-de-Sescas, Saint-Martin-du-Bois, Saint-Martin-du-Puy, Saint-Martin-Lacaussade, Saint-Médard-de-Guizières, Saint-Médard-d’Eyrans, Saint-Médard-en-Jalles, Saint-Michel-de-Fronsac, Saint-Michel-de-Lapujade, Saint-Michel-de-Rieufret, Saint-Morillon, Saint-Palais, Saint-Pardon-de-Conques, Saint-Paul, Saint-Pey-d’Armens, Saint-Pey-de-Castets, Saint-Philippe-d’Aiguille, Saint-Philippe-du-Seignal, Saint-Pierre-d’Aurillac, Saint-Pierre-de-Bat, Saint-Pierre-de-Mons, Saint-Quentin-de-Baron, Saint-Quentin-de-Caplong, Sainte-Radegonde, Saint-Romain-la-Virvée, Saint-Sauveur, Saint-Sauveur-de-Puynormand, Saint-Savin, Saint-Selve, Saint-Seurin-de-Bourg, Saint-Seurin-de-Cadourne, Saint-Seurin-de-Cursac, Saint-Seurin-sur-l’Isle, Saint-Sève, Saint-Sulpice-de-Faleyrens, Saint-Sulpice-de-Guilleragues, Saint-Sulpice-de-Pommiers, Saint-Sulpice-et-Cameyrac, Sainte-Terre, Saint-Trojan, Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, Saint-Vincent-de-Pertignas, Saint-Vivien-de-Blaye, Saint-Vivien-de-Médoc, Saint-Vivien-de-Monségur, Saint-Yzan-de-Soudiac, Saint-Yzans-de-Médoc, Salaunes, Salleboeuf, Samonac, Saucats, Saugon, Sauternes, Sauveterre-de-Guyenne, Sauviac, Savignac, Savignac-de-l’Isle, Semens, Sendets, Sigalens, Sillas, Soulac-sur-Mer, Soulignac, Soussac, Soussans, Tabanac, Taillecavat, Talais, Talence, Targon, Tarnès, Tauriac, Tayac, Teuillac, Tizac-de-Curton, Tizac-de-Lapouyade, Toulenne, Tresses, Uzeste, Val-de-Livenne, Val de Virvée, Valeyrac, Vayres, Vendays-Montalivet, Vensac, Vérac, Verdelais, Vertheuil, Vignonet, Villandraut, Villegouge, Villenave-de-Rions, Villenave-d’Ornon, Villeneuve, Virelade, Virsac and Yvrac.

7.   Wine grape variety(-ies)

 

Cabernet Franc N

 

Cabernet Sauvignon N

 

Carmenère N

 

Cot N – Malbec

 

Merlot N

 

Muscadelle B

 

Petit Verdot N

 

Sauvignon B – Sauvignon Blanc

 

Sauvignon Gris G – Fié Gris

 

Semillon B

8.   Description of the link(s)

The geographical area benefits from favourable, relatively homogeneous climatic conditions for vine growing, that is, a location close to large water bodies (the Atlantic Ocean, the Gironde estuary, the valleys of Garonne and Dordogne), which play an important role in regulating the temperature. However, the maritime influences that help mitigate spring frost weaken as one moves away from the sea and large valleys towards the forested areas of Les Landes, Saintonge and Double Périgourdine. These special features explain why there are few vineyards on the northernmost and south-south-westernmost edges of the geographical area. The area extends over 494 of the 535 municipalities of the department of Gironde, excluding the south-western part, which is given over to forestry rather than winegrowing.

The Bordeaux vine varieties, grown in a maritime climate, have needed support poles (échalas) since the 17th and 18th centuries, followed by widespread trellising to ensure a well-distributed grape harvest and sufficient leaf area for proper chlorophyll synthesis and optimum ripeness. The various types of soils and exposures have led to different varieties being selected and adapted according to the characteristics of the environment. Four distinct types can be identified:

clay-limestone and marly-limestone soils, which are very widespread on the slopes of the hillsides ideal for the Merlot N variety;

siliceous soils mixed with clays and calcareous elements that are perfect for the Merlot N and Sauvignon B varieties, for example;

leached soils (boulbènes) with fine siliceous elements, which are lighter soils suitable for the production of dry white wines;

gravelly soils made up of gravel, water-worn quartz and relatively coarse sands forming well-drained terraces that are warm and ideal for growing vines, in particular Cabernet Sauvignon N.

The compatibility of the various grape varieties, the diversity of the biophysical environment, the way the vines are tended and the wine-making process result in wines with a particular style, characterised by a great aromatic richness. Bordeaux’s port and close historical ties with other countries soon gave rise to strong and well-organised trade, and the region’s vineyards have always been oriented towards the rest of the world. Able to both benefit from and spread technical innovations, they became more dynamic and were able to strengthen, develop and export their expertise.

The marriage in 1152 of Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, to Henry Plantagenet, the future king of England, led to a flourishing trade where the English imported Bordeaux wines, which they named ‘claret’ because of their light colour. This tradition continued over time and is found today in the use of the terms ‘clairet’ and ‘claret’.

In the 17th century, a new commercial era began as new consumers emerged. Exports continue to account for a large part of the sales of Bordeaux wines. A third of the volume produced is shipped to more than 150 countries. The production of PDO wines – a vital resource of the department of Gironde – has contributed greatly to shaping both the rural and urban landscapes and the local architecture (wine-growing châteaux and wineries).

The department’s main towns and cities are ports on rivers that developed around the wine trade.

9.   Essential further conditions (packaging, labelling, other requirements)

Area in immediate proximity

Legal framework:

National legislation

Type of further condition:

Derogation concerning production in the demarcated geographical area

Description of the condition:

The area in immediate proximity, defined by derogation for making, developing and ageing wines eligible to use the ‘Bordeaux’ protected designation of origin (whether or not it is supplemented by the indication ‘clairet’ or ‘claret’) comprises the following municipalities, based on the Official Geographic Code in force on 1 January 2022:

Department of Dordogne: Le Fleix, Fougueyrolles, Gageac-et-Rouillac, Gardonne, Minzac, Pomport, Port-Sainte-Foy-et-Ponchapt, Razac-de-Saussignac, Saint-Antoine-de-Breuilh, Saint-Seurin-de-Prats, Saussignac, Thénac and Villefranche-de-Lonchat.

Department of Lot-et-Garonne: Baleyssagues, Beaupuy, Cocumont, Duras, Esclottes, Lagupie, Loubès-Bernac, Sainte-Colombe-de-Duras, Savignac-de-Duras and Villeneuve-de-Duras.

Geographical designations – supplementary indications

Legal framework:

National legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

The ‘Bordeaux’ PDO may be supplemented by the indication ‘claret’ for red wines and the indication ‘clairet’ for dark rosé wines in line with the provisions laid down for those kinds of wine, particularly as regards the analytical standards.

In the case of white wines, the ‘Bordeaux’ PDO may be supplemented by the geographical designation ‘Haut-Benauge’ in line with the provisions laid down for that supplementary geographical designation, particularly as regards the geographical area, vine varieties, yield and analytical standards.

Legal framework:

National legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

The geographical designation ‘Haut-Benauge’ should appear immediately after the name of the protected designated of origin ‘Bordeaux’ in letters no larger, either in height or in width, than those forming the name of the protected designated of origin.

Legal framework:

EU legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

The labelling of white wines with a fermentable sugar content greater than 5 g/l and less than 60 g/l should indicate the wine’s fermentable sugar content, as defined by EU legislation.

Broader geographical unit

Legal framework:

National legislation

Type of further condition:

Additional provisions relating to labelling

Description of the condition:

Wines with this protected designation of origin may specify the broader geographical unit ‘Vin de Bordeaux’ on their labels. The size of the letters used for this broader geographical unit must not be larger, either in height or in width, than two thirds of the size of the letters forming the name of the protected designation of origin.

Link to the product specification

https://info.agriculture.gouv.fr/gedei/site/bo-agri/document_administratif-0d742d0f-4323-4219-8903-290a5d27bf55


(1)   OJ L 9, 11.1.2019, p. 2.


ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/C/2023/1453/oj

ISSN 1977-091X (electronic edition)


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