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Document 32022D1965

Council Decision (CFSP) 2022/1965 of 17 October 2022 in support of the United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects

ST/11709/2022/INIT

OJ L 270, 18.10.2022, p. 67–81 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, GA, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

Legal status of the document In force

ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/dec/2022/1965/oj

18.10.2022   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

L 270/67


COUNCIL DECISION (CFSP) 2022/1965

of 17 October 2022

in support of the United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects

THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION,

Having regard to the Treaty on European Union, and in particular Articles 28(1) and 31(1) thereof,

Having regard to the proposal from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy,

Whereas:

(1)

On 20 July 2001, the States participating in the United Nations (UN) Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects adopted the UN Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (‘the UN Programme of Action’). On 8 December 2005, the UN General Assembly adopted the International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace, in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons (‘the International Tracing Instrument’). Both of those international instruments declare that States will cooperate, as appropriate, with the UN to support their effective implementation.

(2)

On 12 July 2002, the Council adopted Joint Action 2002/589/CFSP (1) on combating the destabilising accumulation and spread of small arms and light weapons (‘SALW’).

(3)

On 16 December 2005, the European Council adopted the EU Strategy to combat illicit accumulation and trafficking of SALW and their ammunition. That Strategy identifies support for the UN Programme of Action as the first priority for action at international level, and calls for the adoption of a legally binding international instrument on the tracing and marking of SALW and their ammunition.

(4)

Following the adoption of the International Tracing Instrument, the Union supported its full implementation through the adoption and implementation of Council Joint Action 2008/113/CFSP (2). The Council assessed the implementation of the Joint Action positively.

(5)

On 18 July 2011, the Council adopted Decision 2011/428/CSFP (3), which supported the second United Nations Conference to Review Progress Made in the Implementation of the UN Programme of Action in 2012.

(6)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development launched on 25-27 September 2015 affirms that combating the illicit trade in SALW is necessary for the achievement of many sustainable development goals, including those relating to peace, justice and strong institutions, poverty reduction, economic growth, health, gender equality and safe cities. Therefore, in Sustainable Development Goal 16.4, all States have committed to significantly reducing illicit financial and arms flows.

(7)

On 3 April 2017, the Council adopted Decision 2017/633/CFSP (4), which supported the third United Nations Conference to Review Progress Made in the Implementation of the UN Programme of Action in 2018. On 30 June 2018, the third Review Conference adopted an outcome document in which States renewed their commitment to preventing and combating the diversion of SALW. States reaffirmed their willingness to pursue international cooperation and to reinforce regional cooperation through improved coordination, consultation, information exchange and operational cooperation, involving relevant regional and sub-regional organisations, as well as law enforcement, border control and export and import licensing authorities.

(8)

In his Agenda for Disarmament ‘Securing our Common Future’, which was presented on 24 May 2018, the UN Secretary-General called for addressing the excessive accumulation of and illicit trade in conventional arms, and for supporting country-level approaches on SALW and their ammunition identified as a key enabler of armed violence and conflict.

(9)

On 19 November 2018, the Council adopted the EU Strategy against Illicit Firearms, Small Arms & Light Weapons and their Ammunition, entitled ‘Securing Arms, Protecting Citizens’ (the ‘EU SALW Strategy’), which sets the guidelines for Union action in the field of SALW. The EU SALW Strategy considers the UN Programme of Action as the global framework to counter the threat posed by illicit SALW and supports its full and effective implementation at national, regional, and global levels.

(10)

On 17 December 2018, the Council adopted Decision 2018/2011/CFSP (5). The EU SALW Strategy states that the Union will systematically mainstream gender considerations in the design of new projects relating to the fight against gun violence and SALW control in general, and the sharing of good practices in that regard.

(11)

The final report of the 2022 ‘Eight Biennial Meeting of States to Consider the Implementation of the UN Programme of Action’ notes:

that the full and effective implementation of the Programme of Action and the International Tracing Instrument is vital for advancing efforts towards sustainable peace, security, socioeconomic development, enjoyment of human rights and the protection of lives, also as outlined in the relevant provisions on SALW in the UN Secretary-General’s Agenda for Disarmament,

the need for the full, equal, meaningful, and effective participation of women in all decision-making, and implementation processes relating to the Programme of Action and the International Tracing Instrument and encourages mainstreaming a gender perspective into their implementation efforts to address the differential impact of the illicit trade in SALW on women, men, girls and boys,

the role which civil society plays in supporting States’ efforts for the full and effective implementation of the Programme of Action and recognises the positive contributions youth can bring in this regard,

the need for enhanced, effective and sustainable international cooperation and assistance,

that recent developments in SALW manufacturing, technology and design, in particular polymer and modular weapons and firearms produced by 3D printing, have implications for the full and effective implementation of the Programme of Action and the International Tracing Instrument, and should be addressed by all States, taking into account opportunities, challenges, the role of industry, as well as, the need for financial and technical support, technological gaps between States and the need to foster international cooperation,

the importance of effective tracing of SALW to combat the illicit trade in SALW in conflict and post-conflict settings,

the importance of developing or establishing strict national regulatory frameworks for the marking, recording and tracing of SALW, in line with the International Tracing Instrument to prevent and combat the diversion and the illicit international transfer of SALW to unauthorised recipients,

the need to implement the commitments on marking, record-keeping and tracing contained in the International Tracing Instrument regardless of the materials or methods used in the manufacture of SALW,

the establishment of the open-ended working group established pursuant to General Assembly resolution 76/233 to elaborate a set of political commitments as a new global framework that will address existing gaps in through-life ammunition management,

the respective roles of those involved in the different stages of the entire life cycle of SALW, including the importance of cooperation with industry and the private sector, as appropriate, to effectively prevent the illicit manufacture of and trade in SALW,

HAS ADOPTED THIS DECISION:

Article 1

1.   With a view to the implementation of the EU SALW Strategy, the purpose of this Decision is to support the full and effective implementation of the UN Programme of Action and the International Tracing Instrument, enhance international, regional and national security, contribute to the realisation of human security, and promote sustainable development through SALW control.

2.   Pursuant to paragraph 1, the objectives of this Decision are the following:

(a)

to support forward-looking global policy developments in the context of the fourth United Nations Conference to Review Progress Made in the Implementation of the UN Programme of Action in 2024;

(b)

to strengthen effective national and regional implementation of the Programme of Actions and the International Tracing Instrument;

(c)

to support gender-responsive SALW control policies and programmes.

3.   A detailed description of the project is set out in the Annex to this Decision.

Article 2

1.   The High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (‘HR’) shall be responsible for implementing this Decision.

2.   The technical implementation of the project referred to in Article 1 shall be carried out by the UN Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

3.   UNODA shall perform its tasks under the responsibility of the HR. For that purpose, the HR shall enter into the necessary arrangements with UNODA.

Article 3

1.   The financial reference amount for the implementation of the project financed by the Union shall be EUR 4 524 465,05.

2.   The expenditure financed by the reference amount set out in paragraph 1 shall be managed in accordance with the procedures and rules applicable to the general budget of the Union.

3.   The Commission shall supervise the proper management of the expenditure referred to in paragraph 1. For that purpose, it shall conclude the necessary financing agreement with UNODA. The financing agreement shall stipulate that UNODA is to ensure the visibility of the Union’s contribution, appropriate to its size.

4.   The Commission shall endeavour to conclude the financing agreement referred to in paragraph 3 as soon as possible after the entry into force of this Decision. It shall inform the Council of any difficulties in that process and of the date of conclusion of the financing agreement.

Article 4

1.   The HR shall report to the Council on the implementation of this Decision on the basis of regular narrative reports prepared by UNODA. Those reports shall form the basis of the evaluation to be carried out by the Council.

2.   The Commission shall report on the financial aspects of the project referred to in Article 1.

Article 5

1.   This Decision shall enter into force on the date of its adoption.

2.   This Decision shall expire 36 months after the date of conclusion of the financing agreement referred to in Article 3(3). However, it shall expire 6 months after the date of its entry into force if no financing agreement has been concluded within that period.

Done at Luxembourg, 17 October 2022.

For the Council

The President

J. BORRELL FONTELLES


(1)  Council Joint Action 2002/589/CFSP of 12 July 2002 on the European Union’s contribution to combating the destabilising accumulation and spread of small arms and light weapons and repealing Joint Action 1999/34/CFSP (OJ L 191, 19.7.2002, p. 1).

(2)  Council Joint Action 2008/113/CFSP of 12 February 2008 in support of the International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace, in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW) in the framework of the EU Strategy to combat the illicit accumulation and trafficking of SALW and their ammunition (OJ L 40, 14.2.2008, p. 16).

(3)  Council Decision 2011/428/CFSP of 18 July 2011 in support of United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs activities to implement the United Nations Programme of Actions to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (OJ L 188, 19.7.2011, p. 37).

(4)  Council Decision (CFSP) 2017/633 of 3 April 2017 in support of the United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (OJ L 90, 4.4.2017, p. 12).

(5)  Council Decision (CFSP) 2018/2011 of 17 December 2018 in support of gender mainstreamed policies, programmes and actions in the fight against small arms trafficking and misuse, in line with the Women, Peace and Security agenda (OJ L 322, 18.12.2018, p. 38).


ANNEX

PROJECT DOCUMENT SUPPORTING THE UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME OF ACTION TO PREVENT, COMBAT AND ERADICATE THE ILLICIT TRADE IN SMALL ARMS AND LIGHT WEAPONS IN ALL ITS ASPECTS

1.   Background

The adoption of the United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects (PoA) in 2001 marked a turning point in international efforts to counter the illicit trade in small arms and light weapons (SALW). Since then, important progress has been made in implementing the provisions of the PoA and its tracing instrument, the 2005 International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace, in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons (ITI). However, challenges and obstacles still stand in the way of the full and effective implementation of both instruments.

Effective small arms control does not only contribute to strengthening national and human security. It also promotes sustainable development as recognized by states in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which serves as an umbrella for comprehensive global policymaking and programming. The illicit flows of arms play a central role in initiating, exacerbating, and sustaining armed conflict, pervasive violence and acts of crime and terrorism. These flows, particularly in conflict settings, negatively affect the work of humanitarian and peace operations personnel and complicate the conclusion of peace agreements.

The PoA and ITI continue to provide the universal framework, which all UN Member States have agreed upon, for tackling the small arms problem, committing all states to improve national small arms laws and policies, import/export controls, stockpile management, marking and tracing, and to engage in cooperation and assistance. Yet, new challenges related to SALW control, among them developments in SALW manufacturing, technology and design, have emerged over the past decades which could undermine the effectiveness of some of the provisions set out in the PoA and ITI.

The eighth Biennial Meeting of States (BMS8), which took place in June 2022, and the fourth Review Conference (RevCon4), scheduled for 2024, provide opportunities for states to take stock of the remaining gaps, address new challenges and set in motion remedial and corrective policy and operational measures, enabling States to strengthen the global policy agenda and the effectiveness of the PoA and ITI.

From commitments to action

Despite commendable progress at the global policy level, firm national and regional actions are still required to implement the global commitments and regional instruments states have agreed upon. With an estimated one billion firearms in circulation worldwide (1), SALW control remains an urgent and pressing task.

Requests for international assistance (2) remain high. Enhanced, sustainable, and predictable assistance mechanisms are required to meet the demands and strengthen the control and regulation of SALW. For many states to fully meet political commitments related to small arms control, including those under the 2030 Agenda for Development, international assistance is needed.

Many states continue to lack national coordination mechanisms and in many countries where they exist, they are weak. These mechanisms are essential to the harmonization of national policies and programmes, the development, implementation and evaluation and monitoring of comprehensive national policies, strategies, and programmes to address small arms problems. The number of national action plans on SALW remains low and, where they exist, the allocation of funds or integration into wider national development and security frameworks is lacking. Data collection continues to be a major challenge in many states, undermining tracing, and the quantitative monitoring of implementation efforts. Where data is available, harmonizing and disaggregating national data remains challenging. While relative progress has been made on marking, consistently high demands for assistance are received for stockpile management, record-keeping, transfer controls and tracing. (3) With tracing being part of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) framework, low success rates in this framework undermine the achievement of the 2030 Agenda in particular. (4)

Since the Sixth Biennial Meeting of States in 2016, significant progress has been made globally on strengthening the linkages between small arms control and gender equality. The unique, deeply societal characteristics of the small arms issue necessitates a comprehensive mainstreaming of gender perspectives in all dimensions of small arms control. Notable progress in the implementation of gender-related provisions is visible in national reports submitted by Member States to UNODA, indicating a jump from 40% to 63% between 2018 and 2022 of States which now take account of gender considerations in small arms control. (5)

The EU’s Council Decision (CFSP) 2018/2011 of 17 December 2018 in support of gender mainstreamed policies, programmes and actions in the fight against small arms trafficking and misuse, in line with the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda which deployed its activities in Africa, Asia and the Pacific and Latin America and the Caribbean, has played a significant role in those efforts. Nevertheless, the depth and geographical implementation of such efforts varies widely and only 24% of States reportedly collect sex and age disaggregated data related to small arms. (6) Without the benefits of accurate, detailed, and evidence-based information on the different risks that small arms present to women, men, girls and boys and their specific security needs, small arms control interventions are likely remaining gender-blind, hampering effective policy and programmatic developments and impeding achievement of SDG 5. Further advances in this regard will also benefit the implementation of the WPS agenda, with the new WPS Monitoring Framework including an indicator on the “Number of countries taking into account gender considerations in the implementation of the Programme of Action (PoA) on small arms and light weapons” which this project will contribute to.

The small-arms issue manifesting itself in vastly different ways around the world and the challenges faced at the national level regarding the circulation of illicit SALW reflect unique combinations of circumstances and contexts. Consequently, progress in implementation can only, to a limited extent, be a concerted, globally coordinated effort, but must rather be based on national and regional ownership and priorities. Hence, states agreed at the Seventh Biennial Meeting of States on the PoA (BMS7) “to consider the establishment of voluntary national and regional targets in line with the provisions of the Programme of Action, taking into account varying national and regional contexts, with a view to strengthening national and regional ownership and the measurability of implementation progress.”  (7) Such targets should relate to actions set out in national action plans or strategies on SALW, including regional roadmaps, and should be measurable and be aligned with the PoA and ITI as well as the Goals and targets agreed in the 2030 Agenda. Moreover, national efforts on SALW control must be harmonized with other national frameworks relevant to security, gender equality and development, whenever they exist.

States will look to the UN Secretariat for guidance and assistance in implementing this new target-driven approach, which ultimately provides a unique opportunity for more tailored international assistance requests and resource allocation as well. (8) The recent trends in the establishment of regional roadmaps/action plans and programmes are an excellent example of how target setting can facilitate progress on implementation, while ensuring that coordinated assistance is provided to support those efforts.

Building on previous projects and successes, paving the way forward

The European Union and its Member States have provided valuable financial contributions in support of the PoA to the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA) and its regional centres over the past years, supporting the preparations of Review Conferences under the PoA (9); financing operational aspects such as enhanced stockpile management in Africa (10); and most recently supporting gender mainstreamed policies, programmes and actions in the fight against small arms trafficking and misuse, in line with the Women, Peace and Security agenda (11).

Tangible outcomes of those projects included the agreement of a forward-looking outcome document at the Third Review Conference (12) enabled by expert discussions, regional consultations and a sponsorship programme that ensured a wider and more equitable participation of states and civil society representatives at the Conference. In Africa, operational and technical capacities were enhanced which concretely strengthened the Physical Security and Stockpile Management (PSSM) in Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, and Nigeria. The ongoing gender and small arms control project built national capacities in countries worldwide in support of gender-responsive small arms control, trained representatives of regional and sub-regional organizations on the issue, and significantly enhanced synergies between small arms control efforts and the implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda.

This project proposal builds on those previous projects and their successes, while introducing a new, three-fold approach to advance the effective implementation of the PoA and the ITI.

The new project will enable UNODA and its regional centres to ensure that global policy making, and national and regional implementation are aligned, and cross-regional learning continues to take place.

2.   Project objectives, activities, and outcomes

The overriding objective of the project is to enhance international, regional and national security, contribute to the realization of human security and promote sustainable development through SALW control.

This will be achieved through a cross-cutting approach, supporting work on (1) forward-looking global policy developments in the context of the Fourth Review Conference; (2) effective national and regional implementation of the PoA and ITI; and a particular focus on (3) gender-responsive small arms control policies and programmes.

In tandem, the three pillars will bolster the PoA and ITI as universal global small arms control frameworks and ensure their continued relevance and effectiveness.

Outcomes across all three pillars:

Engagement with regional and sub-regional organizations is increased, enabling a more streamlined approach to policy and implementation efforts on the sub-regional, regional and global levels.

Civil society engagement, in particular women’s organizations and youth actors, is strengthened at all levels.

3.   Description of Projects’ Pillars Strategies

3.1   Advancing global policies and commitments in the context of the 2024 Fourth UN Review Conference (RevCon4) of the Programme of Action on small arms.

3.1.1   Outcomes

The relevance and effectiveness of the PoA/ITI are ensured and increased.

RevCon4 on the PoA is well supported and includes a broad range of stakeholders.

National reporting by States under the PoA and ITI is reinforced, including as a framework for data collection for SDG target 16.4 (13) and indicator 16.4.2. (14)

3.1.2   Activities

Virtual expert roundtable discussions to develop action-oriented recommendations related to SALW control in support of RevCon4.

Through a series of virtual expert roundtable different topics are discussed and explored to ensure the relevance and effectiveness of the PoA and ITI. The roundtable topics will be determined based on the outcomes of BMS8 (i.e., selected from the BMS8 outcome document’s priority areas for further action and consideration at RevCon4). The President-designate of RevCon4 will be invited to all expert roundtables. This activity will be implemented in collaboration with UNIDIR. All expert roundtable meetings will be conducted virtually. The key findings and recommendations of each roundtable will be presented and discussed at all regional meetings.

Substantive and inclusive preparations for RevCon4

Regional meetings will provide a forum for participating States and respective regional organizations to identify region-specific SALW-related challenges and discuss regional priorities for RevCon4. The President-designate of RevCon4 will be invited to all regional meetings.

Other regions and regional organizations will typically organize a preparatory meeting for RevCon4 such as the European Union, the League of Arab States, the Pacific and the OSCE. The project does not need to cover those regions. Upon request, UNODA can participate/be involved in any of those regional meetings to present the findings of the expert roundtable discussions. This activity will be implemented by UNODA and its regional centres in late 2023 / early 2024, with substantive support from UNIDIR. All activities will take place in-person.

The following five regional meetings are suggested:

Countries from sub-regions

Regional organisations

Regional centre

Venue

West Africa and Central Africa

AU, ECCAS, ECOWAS, RECSA, UEMOA, G5 Sahel

UNREC

Lomé, Togo

East Africa and Southern Africa

AU, EAC, SADC, IGAD, RECSA, SARCOM

UNREC

Lomé, Togo

Caribbean

CARICOM

UNLIREC

Virtual

Latin America

MERCOSUR, OAS, SICA

UNLIREC

Virtual

ASEAN and South Asian States

ASEAN, SAARC

UNRCPD

Bangkok, Thailand

Sponsorship programme for participants of developing or severely affected countries to attend RevCon4

Because of a lack of funds, many developing countries struggle to be represented at PoA review conferences by their key officials dealing with SALW issues in capital. A sponsorship programme for a selected group of most-affected countries would enable their participation, thus enriching the deliberations at RevCon4. It also provides a great networking opportunity and can create possible synergies with side events and other activities in the margin of RevCon4.

Participants will be approved by the EEAS upon recommendation by UNODA, including its regional centres. In principle, selected officials from national authorities should be designated PoA national focal points. Other criteria for selection include gender considerations, timely submission of a national report, active participation in regional meetings and/or roundtable discussions.

Actions to strengthen civil society engagement in small arms control

Activities will include research and advocacy, media campaigns, sponsorship programmes and workshops. The activities will be carried out by the International Action Network on Small Arms (IANSA), in liaison/cooperation with UNODA and its regional centres, in support of civil society involvement at RevCon4.

3.1.3   Outputs

—   Four (4) virtual expert roundtables were organized in 2023

The roundtables provided action-oriented recommendations which States could consider including in the outcome document of RevCon4 in 2024. The key findings and recommendations of the roundtable discussions were collated into a single short paper and published ahead of RevCon4. The paper was made available in English and translated into Arabic, French, and Spanish.

—   Five (5) 2-day regional meetings were organized to support governments and organizations from specific regions in preparing for RevCon4

National reporting was included on the agenda of the regional meetings and assistance was made available to delegations wishing to prepare and/or submit their national reports during the meetings. Due to low reporting rates in the Asia and Pacific regions, a dedicated one-day national reporting clinic was conducted following the regional meeting, with a view to increase reporting rates in the region for RevCon4. The findings and recommendations from the expert roundtables (Activity 1.3.1) were presented and discussed at the meetings.

—   Fifteen (15) sponsored participants attended RevCon4

The travel to and accommodation at RevCon4 (not the Preparatory Committee earlier in 2024) for up to 15 participants was sponsored. In addition, travel was also sponsored for one participant from each regional centre (UNREC, UNLIREC, UNRCPD) to attend RevCon4 in New York.

3.1.4   Civil society engagement was strengthened through the following:

i.

A report on the results of BMS8 for civil society organizations was produced and disseminated, which informed the preparations for RevCon4.

ii.

A campaign was designed and promoted for the Global Week of Action Against Gun Violence campaigns with RevCon4 as a thematic focus.

iii.

A civil society guide on RevCon4 was developed and disseminated ahead of the Conference, outlining how civil society could contribute to the preparations and the actual RevCon4.

iv.

Up to ten (10) civil society representatives attended RevCon4 and actively participated in events organized in the margins of RevCon4 through a sponsorship programme.

v.

A preparatory workshop on RevCon4 for participating civil society organizations was held. It was a two-day, in-person activity bringing together IANSA members in New York the weekend before the Conference.

vi.

Up to three (3) advocacy briefing papers for IANSA members on thematic subjects relating to issues that the PoA/ITI has not addressed sufficiently were produced and disseminated. The papers were made available online in English with translation into French and Spanish. Hard copies were made available at RevCon4.

3.2   Ensuring the full and effective implementation of the PoA/ITI based on national and regional priorities, targets, strategies, and action plans

3.2.1   Outcomes

The full and effective implementation of the commitments made by States in the framework of the PoA and ITI is strengthened.

National and regional target setting, agreed by States at BMS7, is piloted.

3.2.2   Activities

Upgrade of the MOSAIC assessment tool (online and paper version) to enable States to carry out self-assessments on the implementation of the PoA/ITI

The MOSAIC assessment tool will enable States to (self-)evaluate the level of implementation of the PoA/ITI and other small arms control frameworks at the national level. It will assist States to identify gaps in their national small arms control systems and determine priority areas to be addressed to strengthen national capabilities and ensure the full and effective implementation of the PoA/ITI.

Findings of assessments can underpin the development of national and regional action plans, strategies, roadmaps and/or targets and ensure that they are based on the provisions agreed upon in key global SALW agreements. The MOSAIC assessment tool can also be used to support the collection and compilation of information to be included in national reports on the implementation of the PoA/ITI and facilitate the development of project proposals for fundraising purposes.

The MOSAIC assessment tool will facilitate national considerations of their small arms control systems against the areas covered by the MOSAIC modules contained in series 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, therefore covering the full lifecycle of small arms, including on cross-cutting issues such as gender and youth. (15) In addition to its use by national authorities, it is envisaged that such a tool can also be used by a broader range of stakeholders, including regional organizations and civil society. It will directly benefit the work of UNODA’s regional centres and can be used during scoping missions under the Saving Lives Entity (SALIENT) (16). In order to ensure these entities can support national efforts to use the MOSAIC assessment tool, a User Guide will be developed and made available.

These activities will be implemented in collaboration with UNIDIR.

Support States to strengthen their implementation efforts of the PoA/ITI

In Latin America and the Caribbean implemented by UNLIREC

Consolidation of a SALW Roadmap for Central American States (2022-2024), engaging all interested Sistema de la Integración Centroamericana (SICA) member states (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama) to bolster implementation of international, regional and sub-regional SALW instruments and reduce the illicit proliferation of arms and ammunition in the sub-region. (17)

Activities will consist of sub-regional seminars, workshops, work-sessions (drafting and thematic meetings). Central American States will be able to garner the political momentum in the run-up to RevCon4 to advance a new sub-regional initiative with clear objectives and indicators.

The consolidation process of the Roadmap initiative will be undertaken in conjunction with the Department of Public Security of the Organization of American States (OAS) and complement activities outlined in EU COUNCIL DECISION (CFSP) 2022/847 of 30 May 2022. UNLIREC’s will be able to guide the process alongside OAS and build on its expertise under the Caribbean Firearms Roadmap. All activities will be coordinated with the sub-regional organization SICA.

Courses on Combating Trafficking in Arms and Ammunition (CTAM) and the Interdicting Small Arms, Ammunition and Parts and Components Course (ISAAPC) will be carried out in South and Central American States.

In Asia-Pacific implemented by UNRCPD

Support of the establishment and training of PoA National Focal Points. To date, only 17 countries have designated and reported a national point of contact on the implementation of the PoA/ITI in the Asia and Pacific region. Under this activity, UNRCPD will support the establishment of national focal points, where they do not exist, and enhance the capacity of existing focal points and national coordination mechanisms through a dedicated regional workshop. This activity will be carried out in 2023 to ensure the designation of national focal points in time for RevCon4. This activity will be conducted virtually.

MOSAIC assessments in selected states to identify gaps and opportunities for strengthened implementation and the establishment of national and regional priorities, targets and action plans. This activity will be conducted in-person.

Assistance to states in the Asia-Pacific region on the implementation of the PoA/ITI. Assistance can be provided on different aspects of SALW control, among them legislative and regulatory aspects, the design and management of small arms control and/or operational support. This may also include sub-regional approaches (e.g., on border security). All activities will be gender responsive and inclusive. They may include operational support, trainings, workshops, meetings, data collection or research activities. Primary beneficiaries will be national authorities and/or security services and defence forces.

UNRCPD will respond to assistance requests from countries during the project implementation. Assistance requests stemming from the other activities carried out under this project, in particular the MOSAIC assessment, or which have been communicated through national reports will be prioritized. Assistance may be provided in person and/or virtually.

In Africa implemented by UNREC

MOSAIC assessments in selected states to identify gaps and opportunities for strengthened implementation and the establishment of national and regional priorities, targets and action plans. This activity will be conducted in-person.

Assistance to states in Africa on the implementation of the PoA/ITI. Assistance can be provided on different aspects of SALW control, among them legislative and regulatory aspects, the design and management of small arms control, and/or operational support. This may also include sub-regional approaches (e.g., on border security). All activities will be gender responsive and inclusive. They may include operational support, trainings, workshops, meetings, data collection or research activities. Primary beneficiaries will be national authorities and/or security services and defence forces.

UNREC will respond to assistance requests from countries during the project implementation. Assistance requests stemming from the other activities carried out under this project, in particular the MOSAIC assessment, or which have been communicated through national reports will be prioritized. Assistance may be provided in person and/or virtually.

Actions to strengthen civil society engagement in small arms control, including:

Annual Campaigns - IANSA and its member organizations will run annual campaign activities for events such as the Global Week of Action Against Gun Violence, International Youth Day, Africa Amnesty Month, International Day of Peace, Day of the African Child, International Gun Destruction Day, Wear Orange, International Women’s Day, and the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence.

Civil society capacity building on SALW control - develop policy-oriented materials and organize learning opportunities for IANSA members, including webinars and presentations, to assess and improve the knowledge of the PoA/ITI and other international/regional/subregional instruments relevant for the control of SALW among civil society to enable them to advocate and promote small arms control.

Civil society engagement, advocacy, and outreach programme on national and regional target-setting, action plans, and/or roadmaps - in consultation and collaboration with UNODA and its regional centres, IANSA will support its network members to discuss with officials and promote the development by states of national and regional targets and priorities for the implementation of the PoA/ITI.

Grant Programme for the sustainable engagement of selected IANSA members - IANSA will establish a Grant Programme for IANSA Members to enable grass-roots organisations to carry out programmatic work. IANSA will establish a process to facilitate the Grant Programme based on clearly defined selection criteria, which will be approved by UNODA.

Advocacy for National Reporting - IANSA and its members, in consultation with UNODA, consistently advocate for regular and comprehensive PoA/ITI reporting through constructive dialogue with national authorities and parliamentarians.

These activities will be carried out by the International Action Network on Small Arms (IANSA), in liaison/cooperation with UNODA and its regional centres and support civil society involvement in the full and effective implementation of the PoA/ITI.

3.2.3   Outputs

MOSAIC assessment tool received the following upgrades:

Development of a MOSAIC assessment tool, which strengthened national small arms controls, supported the implementation of the PoA and informed target setting, as well as action plans, roadmap developments and facilitated international assistance requests. The MOSAIC assessment tool built on the previously developed beta version of the ISACS Assessment Tool, which was limited in scope to series 5 of the International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS).

A paper version of the tool was made available in Arabic, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish. An English-language online version was also made available.

Development and publication of a User’s Guide for the MOSAIC Assessment Tool in English, with translations into Arabic, French, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Combined validation exercises / training sessions of the MOSAIC assessment tool with regional and sub-regional organizations and mechanisms were carried out on the margins of the regional meetings in preparation for RevCon4.

In Latin America and the Caribbean

Up to eight (8) seminars/workshops/work-sessions/meetings were held in person and in virtual settings in support of consolidation of a SALW roadmap for Central American States (2022-2024). During the first year of activities, the Roadmap DRAFT document was consolidated, while year two focused on launching the development of national strategies (National Action Plans (NAPs) or similar initiatives) and the implementation of activities identified in the sub-regional initiative / roadmap.

UNLIREC conducted two (2) ISAAPC courses and four (4) CTAM courses in selected Central American and South American States.

In Asia and the Pacific

A dedicated regional workshop was held. The regional workshop focused on the role and tasks of a National Point of Contact in particular the coordination with national entities, the submission of national reports and the provision of guidance on policy and programming related to SALW control. It was based on MOSAIC module 03.40 on National coordination mechanisms on SALW control.

MOSAIC assessments were conducted in-person in up to two (2) selected states.

Up to four (4) States in the Asia Pacific region received assistance on the implementation of the PoA/ITI.

In Africa

MOSAIC assessments were conducted in-person in up to two (2) selected states.

Up to four (4) States in Africa received assistance on the implementation of the PoA/ITI.

3.2.4   Civil society engagement was strengthened through:

i.

Campaign activities and materials were developed, and small stipends were provided to local and national IANSA member organizations for activities that were carried out during those campaigns.

ii.

Policy-oriented materials were developed and learning opportunities for IANSA members were organized.

iii.

Civil society engagement and advocacy programme established on national and regional target-setting, action plans, and/or roadmaps.

iv.

A grant Programme for the sustainable engagement of selected IANSA members was established.

v.

Advocacy was conducted with national authorities and parliamentarians to improve National Reporting.

3.3   Serving the ongoing demand to strengthen and deepen gender-mainstreamed small arms control policies and programmes, in line with the Women, Peace and Security Agenda

3.3.1   Outcomes

Sustainable strategic and operational capacity to mainstream gender in small arms control among a broad range of key stakeholders is further increased and deepened.

Synergies and actionable linkages with complementary policy frameworks and agendas in particular the 2030 Agenda, the Women, Peace and Security agenda, Our Common Agenda and General Assembly resolutions on women and disarmament are further enhanced.

3.3.2   Activities

All activities will build on the outcomes of the previous EU funded project, namely Council Decision (CFSP) 2018/2011 of 17 December 2018 in support of gender mainstreamed policies, programmes and actions in the fight against small arms trafficking and misuse, in line with the Women, Peace and Security agenda.

Strengthening the small arms control component in the WPS agenda

This includes UNODA’s continued engagement in the Women, Peace and Security Focal Points Network to promote small arms control in WPS national action plans, strategies and implementation efforts. This will be a continued engagement throughout the implementation of the project and be carried out in an in-person and/or virtual format.

Support to States to strengthen gender-responsive small arms control policies and programmes

In Latin America and the Caribbean implemented by UNLIREC

Training on gender-mainstreaming in small arms control in Central and South American States - the courses target national authorities responsible for small arms control and regulation, citizen security and preventing and reducing violence against women/gender-based violence.

Webinar series on SALW controls and gender in the lead up to the RevCon4 - the topics will vary and will be determined in coordination with Central and South American States and in line with the preparations and outcomes of RevCon4.

In Asia-Pacific implemented by UNRCPD

Harmonizing the implementation of converging agendas on small arms control and gender equality - this will involve engaging countries in Asia and the Pacific with expired, existing or planned national action plans on Women, Peace and Security to enhance the implementation of converging agendas with small arms control initiatives. The initiative will also explore synergies with other gender equality frameworks, in particular the Spotlight Initiative.

Regional seminar on the universalization of the ATT in the Asia-Pacific region and the convergence with the WPS agenda - in 2013, States adopted the ATT, a multilateral treaty that specifically regulates the international trade in conventional weapons. The ATT is also the first legally binding weapon-related treaty that recognizes the link between the arms trade and gender-based violence (GBV). Implementing the ATT also enables States to fulfil their commitments on arms exports set out in the PoA in 2001. Accession to the ATT remains low in the Asia-Pacific, however, China’s and the Philippines’ recent accession has created a favourable political momentum in the region to promote the universalization of the Treaty. The workshop built on the engagement of civil society and parliamentarians under the previous project, in which the ATT was identified as a key priority area. The workshop will be implemented in collaboration with key partners, including UN agencies, regional and international organizations and civil society. It will be organized virtually.

In Africa implemented by UNREC

Regional workshops on gender mainstreaming small arms control to exchange on gender-related challenges and priorities - regional workshops will be held for West Africa, Central Africa, East Africa and Southern Africa. These workshops will be implemented in collaboration with regional organizations and key partners and will be organized in-person.

Integrating small arms control into wider gender equality, development and security efforts through a webinar series with experts working on GBV, CRSV, youth engagement, humanitarian issues, and assistance to internally displaced people and refugees to raise awareness of the underlying drivers and impacts of small arms proliferation, trafficking and misuse and the need to link and/or integrate arms control into other agendas. The objective of the webinar series is to develop a multidimensional approach to the prevention and reduction of armed violence and to generate tangible connections between small arms control national authorities, and further stakeholders for this purpose. The webinar series will be implemented in collaboration with key partners and will be organized virtually.

Actions to strengthen civil society engagement in small arms control, including:

Gender Mainstreaming & SALW Report on achievements and lessons learned under the EU funded project (CFSP) 2018/2011, including an overview and assessment of the activities implemented by IANSA and its members and recommendations for further engagement. This report will inform other gender-related activities under this project.

Virtual workshops, trainings and events on gender-mainstreaming small arms control for civil society in partnership with UNODA and its regional centres, IANSA will organize virtual workshops, trainings and events on gender and small arms control throughout the project implementation period for a broad, global audience.

Civil society proposals for enhancing synergies with WPS agenda. Produce a tool kit compiling IANSA members’ proposals for enhancing synergies between small arms control and WPS agendas, focusing on advocacy techniques, cross-regional messaging, and policy implementation that can be applied across regions. The toolkit will be widely disseminated, including during activities organized by IANSA and/or UNODA and its regional centres.

The above activities will be carried out by IANSA, in liaison/cooperation with UNODA and its regional centres, in support of civil society involvement in gender-mainstreamed small arms control policies and programmes, in line with the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

3.3.3   Outputs

Arms control and disarmament, including small arms, was promoted in the United Nations’ work and networks on WPS, including on conflict-related sexual violence(18)

States’ capacity for gender-responsive small arms policies and programmes strengthened through:

 

In Latin America and the Caribbean

Three (3) courses on gender-mainstreaming small arms control in Central and South American States were organized and implemented.

Up to four (4) webinars on SALW controls and gender were held in the lead up and/or follow-up to RevCon4.

 

In Asia-Pacific

One (1) regional workshop will be carried out in 2023 in collaboration with key regional partners such as ASEAN, the Pacific Island Forum and civil society partners.

Regional seminar on the universalization of the ATT in the Asia-Pacific region and the convergence with the WPS agenda was conducted.

 

In Africa

Four (4) three-day regional workshops on gender-mainstreaming small arms control for national commissions/PoA focal points and key stakeholders were held. The workshops presented the progress made under the previous EU funded project and provided a platform for exchanging best practices among countries in the region. It also identified gaps and opportunities to strengthen gender-mainstreaming in small arms control. The third day of the workshop served to meet with regional organizations to define priorities and a strategy for ways forward to translate the outcomes of the workshop into national practice.

A webinar series on small arms proliferation, trafficking and misuse and the need to link and/or integrate arms control into other agendas was held.

3.3.4   Civil society engagement in small arms control is strengthened through:

i.

Production and dissemination of a report on achievements and lessons learned under the EU funded project (CFSP) 2018/2011.

ii.

Virtual workshops, trainings and events on gender-mainstreaming small arms control for civil society were held.

iii.

A tool kit was produced and disseminated, compiling IANSA members’ proposals for enhancing synergies between small arms control and WPS agendas.

4.   Awareness raising, advocacy, outreach and partnerships

UNODA and its implementing partners will generate sustained impact through effective awareness raising, advocacy, outreach, and partnerships.

UNODA will support the dissemination of information and outputs of the proposed activities to the broadest possible audience. Furthermore, outreach will be undertaken in the framework of all relevant actions through media engagement, side events and web tools. UNODA and IANSA will develop and participate in social media campaigns throughout the year.

UNODA and IANSA will make use of the widest possible range of communication tools, including a webpage, written press releases, selected social media tools, side events and informal briefings. The implementation of all actions will be tracked through monitoring and evaluation tools, including participant surveys and regular meetings of the respective working group.

UNODA will take all appropriate measures to ensure proper visibility of the Union's contribution to the action. Such measures will be carried out in accordance with the Commission's Communication and Visibility Manual for European Union External Actions.

Coordination with a wide range of partners, including those benefiting from other EU Council Decisions, will be ensured throughout the project implementation.

UNODA will continue to engage actively in the informal Coordination Mechanism on Gender and SALW, which was established under the ongoing project in 2019.

5.   Duration

The total estimated duration of the project, including all activities under its three pillars will be 36 months.

6.   Reporting

UNODA will prepare regular reports, in line with the negotiated agreement.

7.   Total cost

The total estimated funding sought from the EU for the implementation of Phase II is EUR XXX.


(1)  https://www.smallarmssurvey.org/database/global-firearms-holdings

(2)  https://smallarms.un-arm.org/international-assistance

(3)  Presentation delivered by UNODA at BMS7 entitled “Programme of Action on SALW. International Tracing Instrument. Trends, Challenges and Opportunities. Data from 2020 National Reports”, https://documents.unoda.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/BMS7-UNODA-Trends-challenges-opportunities.pdf

(4)  SDG Indicator 16.4.2 reads: “Proportion of seized, found or surrendered arms whose illicit origin or context has been traced or established by a competent authority in line with international instruments”.

(5)  Presentation delivered by UNODA at BMS7 entitled “Programme of Action on SALW. International Tracing Instrument. Trends, Challenges and Opportunities. Data from 2020 National Reports”.

(6)  https://smallarms.un-arm.org/statistics

(7)  https://undocs.org/A/CONF.192/BMS/2021/1, para 50. See also para 51, 52, 57, and 58.

(8)  https://www.undocs.org/A/74/187

(9)  EU Council Decision 2011/428/CFSP of 18 July 2011 and EU Council Decision (CFSP) 2017/633 of 3 April 2017

(10)  EU Council Decision 2014/912/CFSP of 15 December 2014

(11)  EU Council Decision (CFSP) 2018/2011 of 17 December 2018

(12)  https://meetings.unoda.org/section/poa-revcon3-2018_documents

(13)  SDG Target 16.4: “By 2030, significantly reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime”.

(14)  SDG Indicator 16.4.2: “Proportion of seized, found or surrendered arms whose illicit origin or context has been traced or established by a competent authority in line with international instruments”.

(15)  www.un.org/disarmament/mosaic

(16)  www.un.org/disarmament/salient

(17)  Please note that SICA States Belize and Dominican Republic both form part of the Caribbean Firearms Roadmap, while Nicaragua participation will need to be confirmed.

(18)  Participation, Conflict Prevention, Protection and Relief and Recovery.


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