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Document 32018D1106(02)

Commission Implementing Decision of 24 October 2018 on the publication in the Official Journal of the European Union of the application for registration of a name referred to in Article 49 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council — ‘Ziegen-Heumilch’/‘Goat’s Haymilk’/‘Latte fieno di capra’/‘Lait de foin de chèvre’/‘Leche de heno de cabra’ (TSG)

C/2018/7260

OJ C 400, 6.11.2018, p. 7–10 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

In force

6.11.2018   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 400/7


COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING DECISION

of 24 October 2018

on the publication in the Official Journal of the European Union of the application for registration of a name referred to in Article 49 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council

‘Ziegen-Heumilch’/‘Goat’s Haymilk’/‘Latte fieno di capra’/‘Lait de foin de chèvre’/‘Leche de heno de cabra’ (TSG)

(2018/C 400/04)

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

Having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs (1), and in particular Article 50(2)(b) thereof,

Whereas:

(1)

Austria has sent to the Commission an application for protection of the names ‘Ziegen-Heumilch’/‘Goat’s Haymilk’/‘Latte fieno di capra’/‘Lait de foin de chèvre’/‘Leche de heno de cabra’ in accordance with Article 49(4) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012.

(2)

In accordance with Article 50 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 the Commission has examined that application and concluded that it fulfils the conditions laid down in that Regulation.

(3)

In order to allow for the submission of notices of opposition in accordance with Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, the product specification, referred to in Article 50(2)(b) of that Regulation for the names ‘Ziegen-Heumilch’/‘Goat’s Haymilk’/‘Latte fieno di capra’/‘Lait de foin de chèvre’/‘Leche de heno de cabra’ should be published in the Official Journal of the European Union,

HAS DECIDED AS FOLLOWS:

Sole Article

The product specification referred to in Article 50(2)(b) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 for the names ‘Ziegen-Heumilch’/‘Goat’s Haymilk’/‘Latte fieno di capra’/‘Lait de foin de chèvre’/‘Leche de heno de cabra’ (TSG) is contained in the Annex to this Decision.

In accordance with Article 51 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, the publication of this Decision shall confer the right to oppose to the registration of the name referred to in the first paragraph of this Article within three months from the date of publication of this decision in the Official Journal of the European Union.

Done at Brussels, 24 October 2018.

For the Commission

Phil HOGAN

Member of the Commission


(1)  OJ L 343, 14.12.2012, p. 1.


ANNEX

SPECIFICATION FOR A TRADITIONAL SPECIALITY GUARANTEED

‘Ziegen-Heumilch’/‘Goat’s Haymilk’/‘Latte fieno di capra’/‘Lait de foin de chèvre’/‘Leche de heno de cabra’

EU No: TSG-AT-02290-22.2.2017

Austria

1.   Name(s) to be registered

‘Ziegen-Heumilch’ (de); ‘Goat’s Haymilk’ (en); ‘Latte fieno di capra’ (it); ‘Lait de foin de chevre’ (fr); ‘Leche de heno de cabra’ (es)

2.   Type of product

Class 1.4. Other products of animal origin (eggs, honey, various dairy products except butter, etc.)

3.   Grounds for registration

3.1.   The product

results from a mode of production, processing or composition corresponding to traditional practice for that product or foodstuff;

is produced from raw materials or ingredients that are those traditionally used.

Haymilk production is the most natural form of milk production. The milk comes from animals on traditional, sustainable dairy farms. The key difference between standard milk and haymilk, and haymilk’s traditional character, stems from the fact that, as in the earliest form of milk production, the animals are not given any fermented feed. Since the 1960s, and due to mechanisation, the industrialisation of farming has increasingly relied upon the production of silage (fermented feed), thus reducing dry-fodder farming. Moreover, regulations prohibit the use of animals and feed which are to be identified as ‘genetically modified’ under prevailing legislation. The feeding procedure is adapted to match seasonal changes: in the ‘green-feeding period’, animals are fed mainly fresh grass and foliage and some hay and forms of feed permitted under point 4.2; in the winter period, animals are fed hay or other forms of feed permitted under point 4.2.

3.2.   The name

has been traditionally used to refer to the specific product;

identifies the traditional character or specific character of the product.

Goat’s haymilk production and processing is as old as the tradition of goat farming (dating back to around the 11th century BC). Goat farming was widespread in the foothills of the Alps and the Tyrolean mountains in the Middle Ages, on small-scale Alpine dairy farms called ‘Schwaighöfe’. The labourers on these farms often took goats with them as a source of milk on rugged mountain meadows that were particularly far from the farms. The word ‘Schwaig’ comes from Middle High German and denotes a special form of settlement and, in particular, farming in the Alpine region. ‘Schwaighof’ farms were often established as permanent settlements by land-owners and their cattle stock was primarily used for dairy farming (particularly for cheese production). Evidence of their presence in Tyrol dates back to the twelfth century. In certain areas of the Alps where farms were divided equally among heirs, small-scale valley farmers would keep goats to supply them with milk.

4.   Description

4.1.   Description of the product to which the name under point 1 applies, including its main physical, chemical, microbiological or organoleptic characteristics showing the product’s specific character (Article 7(2) of this Regulation)

Goat’s milk in accordance with the applicable legislation.

4.2.   Description of the production method of the product to which the name under point 1 applies that the producers must follow including, where appropriate, the nature and characteristics of the raw materials or ingredients used, and the method by which the product is prepared (Article 7(2) of this Regulation)

‘Goat’s Haymilk’ is produced according to traditional production conditions that comply with the ‘Heumilchregulativ’ (regulations on haymilk production). This form of milk is distinguished by rules prohibiting the use of fermented feed, such as silage, and of animals and feed which are to be identified as ‘genetically modified’ under prevailing legislation.

Heumilchregulativ

‘Goat’s Haymilk’ is a form of goat’s milk produced by dairy farmers who have undertaken to comply with the following criteria. No animals or feed which are to be identified as ‘genetically modified’ under prevailing legislation may be used.

The entire agricultural holding must be managed according to these rules of haymilk production.

Permitted types of feed

The animals are mainly fed fresh grass, leguminous plants and foliage during the ‘green-feeding period’ and hay in the winter period.

The following are included and permitted as further roughage: green rapeseed, green maize, green rye and fodder beets, as well as hay, lucerne and maize pellets and similar types of feed.

Roughage must make up at least 75 % by weight of the yearly ration of dry feed.

The cereal crops wheat, barley, oats, triticale, rye and maize are also permitted, in their conventional commercial form and in composites with minerals (e.g. bran, pellets).

The following may also be used as feed: beans, field peas, oleaginous fruits, and extraction meal or cakes.

Prohibited types of feed

The following types of feed are prohibited: silage (fermented feed), damp hay and fermented hay.

Animals may not be fed by-products from breweries, distilleries, fruit pressing, or other by-products from the food industry, such as wet brewer’s grains or wet cuttings. Exception: dry cuttings and molasses as a by-product of sugar manufacturing, and dry protein feed produced during grain processing.

Lactating animals may not be given any form of wet feed.

Animals may not be fed products of animal origin (milk, whey, meat-and-bone meal, etc.), except for young cows, which may be fed milk and whey.

Animals may not be fed garden waste, fallen fruit, potatoes or urea.

Fertilisation conditions

The use of sewage sludge, sewage sludge products, or compost from municipal treatment plants, with the exception of green compost, is prohibited on all land farmed by milk suppliers.

Milk suppliers must wait at least three weeks after manure spreading before using land to graze livestock.

Use of chemical auxiliaries

Only the selective use of synthetic chemical pesticides under the expert supervision of agronomic specialists, and the targeting of specific sites in any of the green fodder areas of the dairy farm is permitted.

Permitted fly sprays may be used in dairy stalls only when no lactating cows are present.

Compliance with milk delivery deadlines

Milk may not be delivered as ‘Goat’s Haymilk’ within 10 days of kidding.

When goats that have been fed silage (fermented feed) are used, there must be a waiting period of at least 14 days.

As regards alpine animals which have been fed silage (fermented feed) on their farms, either they must be given silage-free feed for 14 days before being moved to alpine pastures, or their milk can be classed as ‘Goat’s Haymilk’ only once they have spent 14 days on alpine pastures (owned by the milk supplier). No silage may be produced or used as feed on the alpine pasture.

Prohibition of genetically modified food and feed

In order to preserve the traditional production of ‘Goat’s Haymilk’, no animals or feed which are to be identified as ‘genetically modified’ under prevailing legislation may be used.

Other provisions

No silage (fermented feed) may be produced or stored.

No film-wrapped round bales of any type may be produced or stored.

No damp hay or fermented hay may be produced.

4.3.   Description of the key elements establishing the product’s traditional character (Article 7(2) of this Regulation)

‘Goat’s Haymilk’ is different from standard goat’s milk on account of its special production conditions described in point 4.2 above, as governed by the ‘Heumilchregulativ’.


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