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Document 52020XC0323(01)

Publication of the single document referred to in Article 94(1)(d) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council and of the reference to the publication of the product specification for a name in the wine sector 2020/C 94/03

C/2020/1738

OJ C 94, 23.3.2020, p. 4–15 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

23.3.2020   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 94/4


Publication of the single document referred to in Article 94(1)(d) of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council and of the reference to the publication of the product specification for a name in the wine sector

(2020/C 94/03)

This publication confers the right to oppose the application pursuant to Article 98 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council (1) within two months from the date of this publication.

SINGLE DOCUMENT

’Achterhoek – Winterswijk’

Reference number: PDO-NL-02402

Date of application: 21 November 2017

1.   Name to be registered

Achterhoek – Winterswijk

2.   Geographical indication type

PDO – Protected designation of origin

3.   Categories of grapevine products

1.

Wine

3.

Liqueur wine

5.

Quality sparkling wine

9.

Aerated semi-sparkling wine

15.

Wine from raisined grapes

16.

Wine from overripe grapes

4.   Description of the wine(s)

Wine category 1: WINE: red wine, dry, fruity or sweet

Grape varieties: Regent (N), Pinotin (N), Acolon (N), Cabertin (N), Cabernet Cortis (N), Monarch (N) or a coupage thereof

Organoleptic properties

Colour: dark red, depending on the combination of varieties

Aroma: dark red fruit such as forest fruits, blackberries and cherries. The specific aroma depends on the combination of the varieties.

Taste: fine fruit aromas for an accessible wine, contains tannins.

Analytical characteristics

The sugar content of the dry, fruity wine is between 0,5 and 6 grams/litre.

The sweet red wines have a sugar content of between 15 and 30 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10,5

Minimum total acidity

63,84 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 1: WINE: red wine, barrel-aged

Grape varieties: Regent (N), Pinotin (N), Acolon (N), Cabertin (N), Cabernet Cortis (N), Monarch (N) or a coupage thereof

Organoleptic properties

Colour: intense red, depending on the combination of varieties

Aroma: dark red fruit such as forest fruits, blackberries and cherries. The specific aroma depends on the combination of the varieties.

Taste: full-bodied wines with vanilla notes, based on a ripe tannin structure

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 0,5 and 6 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

11,5

Minimum total acidity

63,84 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 1: WINE: white wine, dry, fruity or sweet

Grape varieties: Johanniter (B), Souvignier Gris (Rs), Solaris (B), Merzling (B) or a coupage of those varieties

Organoleptic properties

Colour: between yellow and golden yellow, depending on the combination

Aroma: for Solaris and Merzling wines: tropical fruit; Johanniter and Souvignier Gris wines have an aroma of ripe fruit, such as yellow apples.

Taste: fruity and fresh, Johanniter wines containing notes of Riesling, in part because of their acidity, while Souvignier Gris are fuller-bodied.

Solaris wines have a refreshing acidity and Merzling wines combine sweetness with acidic fruitiness.

Analytical characteristics

Sugar content of dry wine: between 1 and 8 grams/litre

Sugar content of sweet wine: between 15 and 30 grams/litre

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10,5

Minimum total acidity

77,14 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 1: WINE: white wine, barrel-aged

Grape variety: Solaris (B)

Organoleptic properties

Colour: golden yellow

Aroma: bouquet of native fruits and tropical fruits such as mango or ripe pineapple

Taste: acidic freshness. The barrels give the wine its woody notes and creamy taste.

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 15 and 30 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10,5

Minimum total acidity

77,14 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 1: WINE: rosé wine, with a full fruitiness

Grape varieties: Regent (N), Pinotin (N), Acolon (N), Cabertin (N), Cabernet Cortis (N), Monarch (N) or a coupage thereof, possibly also with Solaris (B)/Johanniter (B)

Organoleptic properties

Colour: salmon pink

Aroma: sweetish red fruit

Taste: fruity, somewhat sweet character, full-flavoured

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 3 and 10 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10

Minimum total acidity

63,84 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 3: LIQUEUR WINE, red

Grape varieties: Regent (N), Pinotin (N), Acolon (N), Cabertin (N) or a coupage thereof

Organoleptic properties

Colour: red

Aroma: sweet, blackcurrants, slightly spicy

Taste: spicy, with an even balance between sweetness and fruity acidity

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 50 and 100 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

18

Minimum total acidity

63,84 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 5: QUALITY SPARKLING WINE, white

Grape varieties: Johanniter (B), Souvignier Gris (Rs), Solaris (B) or a coupage of those varieties

Organoleptic properties

Colour: white

Aroma: apple, citrus

Taste: fruity, fresh with tiny bubbles, fairly full-bodied

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 5 and 16 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10,5

Minimum total acidity

79,8 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 9: Aerated SEMI-SPARKLING WINE, rosé

Grape varieties: Regent (N), Pinotin (N), Acolon (N), Cabertin (N), Cabernet Cortis (N), Monarch (N) or a coupage thereof, possibly also with Solaris/Johanniter (B)

Organoleptic properties

Colour: salmon pink

Aroma: light, red fruit

Taste: fruity, producing a tingling sensation

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 5 and 16 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

10

Minimum total acidity

63,84 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 15: WINE from raisined grapes, white

Grape variety: Solaris (B)

Organoleptic properties

Colour: golden yellow

Aroma: ripe tropical fruit, honey

Taste: full-bodied, creamy, sweet with a full-bodied freshness

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 120 and 240 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

9

Minimum total acidity

66,5 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

Wine category 16: WINE from overripe grapes, white

Grape variety: Solaris (B)

Organoleptic properties

Colour: golden yellow

Aroma: ripe tropical fruit, honey

Taste: full-bodied, creamy, sweet with a full-bodied freshness

Analytical characteristics

The wine has a sugar content of between 50 and 120 grams/litre.

The characteristics below for which no values are specified are in line with the limits laid down in the EU Regulations.

General analytical characteristics

Maximum total alcoholic strength (in % volume)

 

Minimum actual alcoholic strength (in % volume)

12

Minimum total acidity

73,15 milliequivalents per litre

Maximum volatile acidity (in milliequivalents per litre)

 

Maximum total sulphur dioxide (in milligrams per litre)

 

5.   Wine making practices

a.   Essential oenological practices

Wine production rules and specific oenological practice

The following wine production rules apply to all categories of wine listed below.

The maximum enrichment is subject to the rules laid down in the EU Regulation, with a possible 0,5 % additional enrichment if permitted for the year in question by the national authorities (in this case the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality).

Deacidification is subject to the limits defined in the EU Regulation.

For acidification, approval must be obtained for each year from the national authorities (in this case the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality) following an application for the year in question, after which the limits set out in the EU Regulation will apply.

Wine category 1: WINE: red wine, dry, fruity or sweet

Specific oenological practice

Pulp fermentation for at least 4 days

Wine category 1: WINE: red wine, barrel-aged

Specific oenological practice

Pulp fermentation for at least 4 days

Ageing in wooden barrels for at least 8 months

Wine category 1: WINE: white wine, dry, fruity or sweet

Specific oenological practice

Cold fermentation at below 18 °C (exception: the temperature is increased at the beginning of fermentation for wines that are difficult to ferment)

Wine category 1: WINE: white wine, barrel-aged

Specific oenological practice

Cold fermentation at below 18 °C (exception: the temperature is increased at the beginning of fermentation for wines that are difficult to ferment)

Ageing in wooden barrels of at least 50 % of the volume for a minimum of 3 months

Wine category 1: WINE: rosé wine, fruity fullness

Specific oenological practice

Cold fermentation at below 18 °C (exception: the temperature is increased at the beginning of fermentation for wines that are difficult to ferment)

Wine category 3: LIQUEUR WINE, red

Specific oenological practice

Pulp fermentation for at least 4 days

Ageing in wooden barrels for at least 1 year

Addition of wine alcohol

Wine category 5: QUALITY SPARKLING WINE, white

Specific oenological practice

Cold fermentation at below 18 °C (exception: the temperature is increased at the beginning of fermentation for wines that are difficult to ferment)

Second fermentation in the bottle, using the traditional method

Wine category 9: Aerated SEMI-SPARKLING WINE, rosé

Specific oenological practice

Cold fermentation at below 18 °C (exception: the temperature is increased at the beginning of fermentation for wines that are difficult to ferment)

Addition of carbon dioxide during bottling (at a maximum pressure of 2,5 bar)

Wine category 15: WINE from raisined grapes, white

Specific oenological practice

Late harvest, grapes picked by hand

Grapes dried naturally, then dried on straw, for at least 2 weeks

Made into wine by cold fermentation at below 18 °C

Wine category 16: WINE from overripe grapes, white

Specific oenological practice

Late harvest of grapes with a sugar content of at least 120 degrees Oechsle

Cold fermentation at below 18 °C (exception: the temperature is increased at the beginning of fermentation for wines that are difficult to ferment)

b.   Maximum yields

Red, Regent (N)

50 hectolitres per hectare

Red, Pinotin (N)

50 hectolitres per hectare

Red, Monarch (N)

50 hectolitres per hectare

Red, Acolon (N)

50 hectolitres per hectare

Red, Cabertin (N)

50 hectolitres per hectare

Red, Cabernet Cortis (N)

50 hectolitres per hectare

White, Souvignier Gris (Rs)

60 hectolitres per hectare

White, Souvignier Gris (Rs), raisined grapes

20 hectolitres per hectare

White, Souvignier Gris (Rs), overripe grapes

40 hectolitres per hectare

White, Johanniter (B)

60 hectolitres per hectare

White, Johanniter (B), raisined grapes

20 hectolitres per hectare

White, Johanniter (B), overripe grapes

40 hectolitres per hectare

White, Solaris (B)

50 hectolitres per hectare

White, Solaris (B), raisined grapes

20 hectolitres per hectare

White, Solaris (B), overripe grapes

40 hectolitres per hectare

White, Merzling (B)

60 hectolitres per hectare

6.   Demarcated geographical area

The defined geographical area is located in the eastern part of the Achterhoek region, extending to the border with Germany, and is bounded by the borders of the municipality of Winterswijk.

Within the area of Achterhoek – Winterswijk, the vineyards covered by this protected designation of origin include the areas containing soils classified as HN21, KX and eZE23. They also encompass HN23, ZG23 and ZG21 soils containing the humus and loam which are important for the cultivation of grapes. Taken together, soils of those types make up most of the defined area.

The municipality has a large number of outlying areas, made up of nine hamlets, all forming part of the municipality of Winterswijk. The hamlets, moving clockwise on the map, are as follows: Meddo (1 448 inhabitants), Huppel (414 inhabitants), Henxel (268 inhabitants), Ratum (354 inhabitants), Brinkheurne (272 inhabitants), Kotten (798 inhabitants), Woold (861 inhabitants), Miste (675 inhabitants) and Corle (281 inhabitants). Meddo is the only one of the hamlets to have a village centre with various amenities.

7.   Main wine grapes variety(ies)

 

Cabertin (N) (VB-91-26-17)

 

Cabernet Cortis

 

Johanniter (B)

 

Monarch

 

Acolon

 

Pinotin (N)

 

Regent (N)

 

Souvignier Gris

 

Solaris

 

Merzling (B)

8.   Description of the link(s)

Defined area

Most of the defined area is located on the East Netherlands Plateau and has a different soil structure (containing loam and lime) from the areas of the Achterhoek to the west of Winterswijk (where the soil is made up of fluvial clay and surface sand deposits).

The Winterswijk area is known for its hedgerow landscape and quarry containing fossil remains. Jurassic Lias strata can be found at the surface of a number of stream beds in Winterswijk. In 2005 the Dutch Government accordingly designated the Winterswijk area as the Winterswijk National Landscape Area, covering nearly 22 000 hectares in total.

Soil

The soil of the ‘East Netherlands Plateau’, which contains loam and also lime, surrounds Winterswijk. The soil in the other parts of the Achterhoek region is made up of fluvial clay and surface sand deposits.

The defined area has various types of soil, which alternate and merge with one another.

The soil types have the following characteristics:

A good humus layer.

The soil contains loam, which helps give the wine its fullness of flavour and prevents the soil from drying out.

The loam (lutum) layer will reduce the rate at which the vines wither.

The sandy top soil ensures a good water balance.

The groundwater absorbs the minerals from the subsoil (such as the lime that it contains), providing good nutrition for the vines.

Climate and environment

The defined area is not far from the Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute station at Hupsel, where the (2010-2015) climate averages for the wine-growing season from May to September were:

Average temperature: 15,58 °C

Average minimum temperature: 9,93 °C

Average maximum temperature: 20,83 °C

Average relative humidity: 78,36 %

Average precipitation: 78,54 mm per month

Average hours of sunshine: 192,93 hours per month

The fact that night-time temperatures are slightly below the national average helps to make the wines fresh and fruity, while the somewhat higher maximum temperatures and the greater number of sunshine hours mean that the grapes are riper.

Human aspects (cultivation and wine-making)

The cultivation process is characterised by the following practices, specifically selected to produce a quality wine:

Selection of varieties: The varieties selected are able to ripen well in the local environment and provide the necessary aromas. They are also selected for their resistance, in order to try and make cultivation more sustainable.

Vine density: The rows are set 2-2,2 m apart (to ensure that they get enough sunlight), the spacing between the vines being 1-1,25 m. The area per vine is therefore about 2,2 m2, ensuring that each vine obtains sufficient nutrients (for the grapes to ripen and the aromas to develop).

The strips between the rows of vines are clean-cultivated in order that the heat released at night-time is captured so as to speed up ripening. It also helps to combat night frost. Alternatively, the strips may be kept green, with a covering of short vegetation.

Vine shoots are topped during growing weather to ensure that the nutrients get to the bunches.

Cultivation is limited (maximum yield as specified in the description of the wines). The bunches are thinned out where necessary.

Training of the vines: It was decided to use the Guyot method (in which the vines are secured to the tying-up wire each year), with an upright leaf canopy growing to a height of approximately 2,2 m (to absorb sunlight for photosynthesis) and an open grape zone once the leaves have been removed (faster drying, sunlight).

One of the key decisions in the cultivation process is when to harvest the grapes. The decision is made on the basis of very close monitoring of the ripening of the grapes – their sugar content, acidity (pH) and aromas – in order to produce a quality wine.

The following processes used play a particularly important part in shaping the character of the wines produced:

The wines are made on the basis of specifications geared to the quality of the harvest (residual sugar content, acidity, minimum alcohol content, ageing in contact with wood). Each year a panel of expert tasters decides on the exact composition of each coupage and whether it should be barrel-aged.

Cool fermentation of white and rosé wines to make them fresh and fruity.

The use of wooden casks for the ageing of red wines, to give them a full flavour with soft tannins, white wines being subjected to partial ageing in contact with wood to produce a fuller wine.

Causal link

The quality of the wine is a result of the combination of climate, soil, cultivation and wine-making practices.

The combination of the layers of soil ensures a good water balance. The subsoil provides lime and mineral nutrients through the groundwater, while the loam and humus contained in the topsoil provide the necessary conditions for grapes to flourish.

Soils containing humus and loam are ideally suited to wine-growing. They retain moisture and nutrients well, allowing the grape aromas to fully develop and produce a full-bodied, robust wine, even in fairly dry periods.

The climate (which is more continental) helps to achieve the required ripeness, but with the freshness and fruity flavour of the wine (as a result of the somewhat lower night-time temperatures).

The human input – such as the selection of varieties, the growing method used (maximum use of sunlight, thinning of bunches), harvest management (checking of sugar levels, acidity and aromas) and wine-making practices (cold fermentation, ageing in wooden barrels) – is a further aspect that, together with the soil and climate, allows quality wines to be produced. The resulting wines are recognisable varietal and coupage wines (full and fruity), with fresh white (ripe fruit/citrus aroma)/rosé wines and red wines with soft tannins.

In summary, the combination of climate (freshness and ripening), soil (loam/humus with lime for good water balance and nutrients), cultivation (selection of varieties, vine density, foliage management, harvest decisions) and wine-making practices (such as cold fermentation, use of barrel ageing) ensures:

the freshness and full, fruity flavour of the white and rosé wines;

the soft tannins and full flavour of the red wines.

This combination applies to the category ‘wine’ but also to the other categories of wine (‘liqueur wine’, ‘quality sparkling wine’, ‘semi-sparkling wine’) which are made in the same way and from the same grapes as wine from Category 1 ‘Wine’ (‘the base wine’) but which have their specific category characteristics added to them by way of additional operations during the wine-making process.

For ‘Wine from raisined grapes’ and ‘Wine from overripe grapes’, the combination of climate, soil, cultivation and wine-making practices is also important. These quality dessert wines are, however, produced by longer ripening (higher sugar content)/drying (higher sugar content/concentration of aromas) of the grapes.

Details of the other wine categories (not ‘Wine’)

Liqueur wine

Liqueur wine consists of a ‘base wine’ with the same organoleptic properties (resulting from the combination of soil, climate and human action) as the category ‘wine’, but with the desired residual sugar content of liqueur wine. Moreover, liqueur wine is barrel-aged for at least 1 year (allowing it to develop softer tannins and woody notes) and wine alcohol is added to turn the wine into a liqueur. Liqueur wine has a minimum actual alcoholic strength of 18 %.

Quality sparkling wine

The ‘base wine’ for quality sparkling wine has the same organoleptic properties as the category ‘wine’ (the same freshness and fruity flavour resulting from the combination of soil, climate and human action). It also has the characteristics resulting from the transformation of the base wine into sparkling wine using bottle fermentation (the traditional method), which gives the wine its elegant mousse. The wine has an excess pressure of at least 3,5 bar. The coupage used for quality sparkling wine has a minimum total alcoholic strength by volume of 10,5 %.

Aerated semi-sparkling wine

The ‘base wine’ used for semi-sparkling wine also has the same organoleptic properties as the category ‘wine’ (the same freshness and fruity taste resulting from the combination of soil, climate and human action). It also has the characteristics resulting from the CO2 added to obtain the bead. Aerated semi-sparkling wine has a minimum actual alcoholic strength of 10 % and an excess pressure of at most 2,5 bar. A fresh and very fruity summer wine.

Wine from raisined grapes (dessert wine)

The essential step of ripening the grapes for longer before drying them for at least 2 weeks is what gives wine from raisined grapes its concentration of sugars and aromas. The cold fermentation process produces a wine with a minimum actual alcoholic strength of 9,4 %.

The concentration of aromas in this fruity wine is a result of the combination of soil, climate and human action. The care taken by the people who make it is, in particular, what gives the dessert wine its full flavour.

Wine from overripe grapes (dessert wine)

As a result of the essential step of ripening the grapes for longer, wine from overripe grapes has a sugar content of at least 110 degrees Oechsle. The result of this process, which involves cold fermentation without enrichment, is a wine with a minimum actual alcoholic strength of 12 % that derives its fruitiness from the combination of soil, climate and human action. The care taken by the people who make it is, in particular, what gives the dessert wine its full flavour.

As a result of this approach, the wines continue to win medals each year in a number of competitions held both in the Netherlands and abroad (e.g. in Vienna).

9.   Essential further conditions

NONE

Link to the product specification

https://www.rvo.nl/sites/default/files/2017/06/Productdossier-BOB-Achterhoek-Winterswijk.pdf


(1)  OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 671.


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