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Moving from aid-dependence to self-reliance

Moving from aid-dependence to self-reliance

 

SUMMARY OF:

Communication (COM(2016) 234 final) — Lives in Dignity: from Aid-dependence to Self-reliance

WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE COMMUNICATION?

The aim is to provide a strategy for how the EU can best support refugees and displaced people in long-drawn-out situations such as the Syrian crisis, aiming to foster resilience* and self-reliance.

KEY POINTS

The challenge of forced displacement calls for continuing action by the EU. This European Commission communication proposes a development approach to forced displacement based on improved evidence of what works and does not work. It aims to prevent displacement from becoming long-drawn-out, and to gradually end the dependence on humanitarian aid of those already displaced.

Changing emphasis

The policy builds on the EU’s strategy of linking relief, rehabilitation and development (LRRD) to develop a strategy integrating humanitarian aid, development cooperation and political involvement. Its elements include:

  • Early involvement of all actors. Political and developmental actors should become involved in displacement crises at the outset, with the aim of improving living conditions and finding solutions to end displacement.
  • Strategies based on evidence of what causes displacement and its consequences should be drawn up, leading to long-term protection and self-reliance, enhanced personal dignity, and reduced impact on host countries.
  • Turning strategies into programmes coordinated with EU financial cycles. In addition, targets agreed between the EU and host countries should take into account unexpected influxes of displaced people without threatening local development or making local communities more fragile.
  • Regional cooperation. There should be greater cooperation between countries facing common challenges. Academic and labour mobility, as well as stronger links between legislative bodies and business, trade unions and social partners should be encouraged.
  • Working with partner countries. Legal registration for displaced populations should be promoted, progressively integrating them into the social and economic life of the community, and boosting engagement with local authorities.
  • Private sector involvement. The private sector should be included in planning from the start of a crisis. Cooperation between the private and public sectors should be facilitated, including encouraging self-employment of displaced persons and help in restarting businesses.
  • Good quality education is important for child protection and a top priority. There should be greater continuity between education in emergencies and public education, and host countries should be encouraged to use the potential of displaced education personnel.
  • Access to labour markets. Helping host governments give displaced people access to labour markets and good jobs while protecting them from exploitation is key.
  • Access to services. Helping host governments provide services such as housing, healthcare, security, justice and social protection for displaced persons is essential.

BACKGROUND

For more information, see:

* KEY TERMS

resilience: the ability to recover from shocks or to adjust rapidly.

MAIN DOCUMENT

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions — Lives in Dignity: from Aid-dependence to Self-reliance (COM(2016) 234 final, 26.4.2016 and COM(2016) 234 final/2, 2.5.2016)

RELATED DOCUMENTS

Commission Staff Working Document Accompanying the document Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions — Lives in Dignity: from Aid-dependence to Self-reliance — Forced Displacement and Development (SWD(2016) 142 final, 26.4.2016)

last update 19.09.2016

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