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Document 52017XG0428(01)

Annual progress report on the implementation of the European Union strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (2016)

OJ C 136, 28.4.2017, p. 1–41 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

28.4.2017   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 136/1


Annual progress report on the implementation of the European Union strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (2016)

(2017/C 136/01)

INTRODUCTION

1.

This Progress Report on the implementation of the European Union strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) adopted by the European Council in December 2003 (doc. 15708/03) covers activities carried out in 2016. The Report is non-exhaustive and focuses on the main developments. All activities were undertaken within the broader context of EU security and conflict-prevention policy.

2.

Based on the Global Strategy for the European Union’s Foreign and Security Policy (doc. 10715/16), the European Union strategy against the proliferation of WMD and the New Lines for Action (doc. 17172/08), the guiding principles of the European Union continue to be:

a.

effective multilateralism, including promoting the universality of international treaties, conventions and other instruments and their implementation, through diplomatic action and financial assistance to third countries and international organisations;

b.

close cooperation with countries to strengthen the international non-proliferation regime.

c.

addressing non-proliferation issues in the EU’s bilateral political and non-proliferation and disarmament dialogue meetings and in more informal contacts;

d.

the effective and complementary use of all available instruments and financial resources — the Common Foreign and Security Policy budget, the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP), other instruments — in order to maximise the impact of the EU’s activities in pursuit of its foreign policy objectives.

3.

The European External Action Service (EEAS), including in many cases the Special Envoy for Disarmament and Non-proliferation and Chairpersons of CONOP and COARM, represented the EU in a number of key international meetings in 2016:

the G7 Non-Proliferation Directors’ Group meetings in Tokyo (12-14 January 2016), Hiroshima (2-5 March 2016) and Vienna (26 September 2016);

the special meeting in Madrid of the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) Committee established under UNSC Resolution 1540, in connection with its Comprehensive Review (12-13 May 2016) and the subsequent Open Consultations on the Comprehensive Review of the Status of Implementation of Resolution 1540 (20-22 June 2016);

the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism 10th Anniversary meeting in The Hague (15-16 June 2016);

the 60th International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference held in Vienna (26 — 30 September 2016);

the UN General Assembly First Committee in New York (October-November 2016);

the 8th Review Conference of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) held in Geneva (7-25 November 2016);

the 21st Session of the Conference of the States Parties to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction (CWC) held in The Hague (28 November — 2 December 2016);

the IAEA International Conference on Nuclear Security: Commitments and Actions held in Vienna (5-9 December 2016).

The Special Envoy focused on:

a.

promoting universal adherence to and entry-into-force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and enhancing the visibility of the EU’s commitment;

b.

initiating and maintaining non-proliferation dialogues with major partners and mainstreaming non-proliferation issues in the EU’s bilateral relations;

c.

preparing for EU participation in the Nuclear Security Summit process and follow-up activities;

4.

The EU Council Working Group on Non-Proliferation convened 11 times in 2016, including at Directors’ level, to discuss EU positions and future activities. The EU delegations in Vienna, Geneva and New York prepared a number of EU statements for multilateral fora and contributed actively to policy-making through regular EU coordination meetings.

NUCLEAR ISSUES

5.

The EU is fully committed to promoting universal adherence to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament agreements. Throughout the year, the EU reiterated its firm support for full, complete and effective implementation of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the early entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) and establishing a zone free of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems in the Middle East. Also high on the agenda was the start and early conclusion of negotiations, at the Conference on Disarmament, on a Treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices.

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

6.

The EU attaches great importance to the core responsibilities of the IAEA regarding non-proliferation, nuclear energy, nuclear safety, nuclear security and technical cooperation. Together with the bilateral contributions from its Member States, the EU is the second largest donor to the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund. The total EU financial contribution to the Fund based on six successive Council Joint Actions/Decisions has reached almost EUR 42 million for the period 2009 — 2016. Building on the success and lessons learned from Council Decision VI, 2013/517/CFSP (1), the EU adopted in December 2016 the 7th Council Decision supporting the IAEA nuclear security activities undertaken under the IAEA Nuclear Security Plan for the period 2017 — 2019 with ca EUR 9,3 million.

7.

EU funding to the IAEA has helped the Agency to assist countries to upgrade and ensure the physical protection of selected facilities, improve their national regulatory infrastructure concerning physical protection and the safety and security of radioactive material and to enact the necessary legislation. Numerous vulnerable sources have been protected, dismantled or disposed of; sensitive nuclear equipment and technology and border monitoring equipment have been upgraded and the training of officials has served to strengthen nuclear security worldwide.

8.

The European Commission Joint Research Centre has continued to support the IAEA’s Illicit Trafficking Database. The IAEA has acknowledged the improvements in reporting achieved through modernising the website of the Incident Notification Forms. The EU support in this respect will continue.

9.

The EU has been contributing to the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) by coordinating the Joint Commission established by the JCPOA and a number of expert-level working groups established under the Joint Commission. All coordination activities were conducted while fully respecting the IAEA’s long-term mission of verification and monitoring of Iran’s nuclear-related commitments. Moreover, the EU has engaged in implementing Annex III of the JCPOA in close coordination with the IAEA to foster civil-nuclear cooperation with Iran, in particular on projects to improve nuclear safety.

10.

In February 2016 EU delegations in 63 countries, supported by EU Member States, engaged in diplomatic outreach activities to prepare the way for the entry into force of the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (ACPPNM). The EU supported the IAEA in promoting the original Convention and its Amendment. Council Decision 2013/517/CFSP contains a heading ‘Increase in the number of States that adhere to the CPPNM and its Amendment and/or have declared their intention to implement the international legal instruments supporting the nuclear security framework’. The EU welcomed the entry into force in May 2016 of the ACPPNM and will continue to help countries in their efforts to fully implement its provisions.

11.

Building on the Council of the European Union’s commitment of 8 December 2008, on 15 November 2016 the Council adopted its Decision (CFSP) 2016/2001 (2) on a Union contribution for the establishment and the secure management of a Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Bank under the control of the IAEA. The over EUR 4 million contribution will help to ensure that nuclear fuel is supplied in a secure and safe manner. It will also help the IAEA guarantee the security and safety of LEU transport from procurement to supply, and during storage at the Bank’s site. The European Commission under the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace has already provided EUR 20 million for the purpose of acquiring the LEU once the project is fully operational.

12.

Comprehensive safeguards agreements together with additional protocols constitute the current verification standard and the EU continues to call for them to be made universally adhered to without delay. The close cooperation between Euratom and the IAEA allows for effective and efficient safeguards. The EU actively supports the IAEA’s safeguards system through the European Commission Safeguards Support Programme and the Support Programmes of some of its Member States.

13.

To further the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the EU has allocated EUR 225 million over the period 2014-2020 to promote nuclear safety, radiation protection and the application of efficient and effective safeguards in third countries. The EU and its Member States attach the utmost importance to the worldwide implementation and continuous improvement of nuclear safety. One of the aims of the Council Directive 2009/71/Euratom (3) of 25 June 2009 establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations is to prevent accidents and, should they occur, mitigate the consequences by avoiding early and large radioactive releases. The EU and its Member States continue to be strong supporters of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme, including through substantial contributions to the Technical Cooperation Fund and the Peaceful Uses Initiative. The EU’s ranking as second largest contributor to the Technical Cooperation Programme also demonstrates its commitment to all three pillars of the NPT.

14.

The EU and the IAEA hold an annual Senior Officials Meeting to review and plan their broad-range cooperation. The 2016 meeting was hosted by the IAEA on 21-22 January in Vienna. The EU Political and Security Committee visited Vienna on 25 April 2016 and held meetings with the IAEA at senior level. Discussions covered IAEA activities in the area of verification, including regional issues, nuclear safety and security, and nuclear applications.

Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)

15.

The early entry into force and universality of the CTBT are important objectives of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. All EU Member States have demonstrated their commitment to the Treaty by ratifying it and by provisionally applying its basic obligations. On the 20th anniversary of the opening for signature of the Treaty, the EU adopted and implemented an EU Action Plan in support of the CTBT and the CTBT Organization (CTBTO) promoting the benefits and added value of the Treaty to peace, security and non-proliferation, including in its civil applications.

16.

On 13 June 2016, at the invitation of the CTBTO Executive Secretary Lassina Zerbo, the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the Commission (HRVP) Ms Federica Mogherini attended the ministerial segment of the 46th Session of the CTBTO Preparatory Commission and delivered an agreed EU statement. Together with the Foreign Minister of Kazakhstan she co-chaired a closed ministerial roundtable discussion to promote the ratification of the CTBT and the benefits of the CTBTO verification regime and opened a special anniversary exhibition. By way of drawing parliamentary attention to the promotion of the Treaty and its benefits, HRVP Mogherini together with the ES Zerbo participated in an exchange of views on the 20th Anniversary of the opening for signature of the CTBT held by the European Parliament Committee on Foreign Affairs (AFET) on 7 July 2016 in Strasbourg. The HRVP also spoke on behalf of the EU at the 8th CTBT Friends Ministerial Meeting ‘Time to finish what we started’, held in New York on 21 September 2016 in the margins of the United Nations General Assembly.

17.

The EU uses every opportunity to advocate CTBT ratification in international fora and meetings with countries that have not yet signed or ratified the Treaty, and continues to use diplomatic means to promote the entry into force of the Treaty in those countries. The CTBT was raised bilaterally in the EU political and NPD dialogues with India, Pakistan and the US. On 31 August 2016 the EEAS Special Envoy for Disarmament and Non-proliferation made a presentation on ‘EU policies and activities in support of disarmament and non-proliferation’ at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi and took the opportunity to promote the CTBT.

18.

The EU will continue to strongly support the CTBT both politically and financially. Since 2006 the Council has adopted seven Joint Actions/Council Decisions to support the activities of the Preparatory Commission of the CTBTO and to further strengthen the Preparatory Commission’s monitoring and verification capabilities. The EU’s total financial support to the CTBTO so far exceeds EUR 18,5 million.

Nuclear Security initiatives

19.

The EU was among only four international organisations invited to attend the Nuclear Security Summit chaired by US President Obama from 31 March to 1 April 2016. The European Union was represented by the President of the European Council Tusk and HRVP Mogherini. The Summit concluded with a communique and five action plans in support of relevant work at the UN, the IAEA, INTERPOL, the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism (GICNT) and the Global Partnership against the Spread of Weapons of Mass Destruction. In December 2016 the EU joined the Nuclear Security Contact Group (NSCG).

20.

The EU continued to support the GICNT and its mission to strengthen global capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to nuclear terrorism. The EU participated in the successful GICNT Anniversary Meeting which took place on 15-16 June 2016 in The Hague, Netherlands. The EU Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Action Plan comprising 124 actions, was successfully implemented. Based on an all-hazard approach, the Action Plan overall goal was to reduce the threat of, and damage from CBRN incidents of accidental, natural and intentional origin, including terrorist acts. The EU Nuclear Security Training Centre for detection and response to illicit acts with nuclear and other radioactive materials (EUSECTRA) has been fully operational since 2013 for the benefit of European Union Member States and partner countries, among them several GICNT members. The Centre is operated by the EU Joint Research Centre (JRC) at its sites in Karlsruhe (Germany) and Ispra (Italy), in close cooperation with other international initiatives promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency and several GICNT partner countries. The Centre is also used for practical exercises mainly related to countering nuclear smuggling such as the Counter Nuclear Smuggling Workshop held in Karlsruhe on 8-10 March 2016 in partnership with the United States. Experts from several countries together with representatives from the GICNT, the IAEA and INTERPOL shared best practices and lessons learned in leveraging investigative and technical capabilities to counter smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. On 23 November 2016 in Karlsruhe JRC organized a high-level scenario-based exercise ‘APEX-Europe’ for all EU Member States.

21.

The European Commission and the EU Member States continued their nuclear forensics activities on the basic characterisation of intercepted nuclear material, using an advanced nuclear forensic investigation at the JRC Institute for Transuranium Elements. Overall, nuclear materials detected and seized in more than 50 incidents have been examined thus providing support to competent authorities in EU Member States and beyond.

Regional issues

22.

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s (DPRK) nuclear weapons, WMD and ballistic missile programmes and its decision to cease all cooperation with the IAEA continue to be a major cause for concern to the EU. The HRVP condemned in the strongest terms the two nuclear tests carried out by the DPRK on 6 January and 9 September 2016. The EU used every opportunity to state its concerns and to underline a) that nuclear weapons test explosions represent a threat to international peace and security and undermine the non-proliferation regime, and b) that the DPRK actions aggravate tensions on the Korean Peninsula to the detriment of all and are in clear violation of its international obligations under relevant UN Security Council Resolutions, including UNSCR 2270 and UNSCR 2321, as well as under relevant IAEA General Conference resolutions. The EU has put into effect all relevant UN Security Council resolutions. In line with the objectives of these resolutions it has adopted additional autonomous restrictive measures as a further step in the defence of the international non-proliferation regime.

23.

The EU, through the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Korea, co-sponsored a seminar on the nuclear and ballistic missile dimensions of the DPRK crisis in Seoul on 24-25 October 2016.

24.

Regarding other regions, the EU continued to demonstrate its commitment in relevant multilateral fora to establishing a zone free of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems in the Middle East. This issue also falls within the scope of discussions in the newly established EU — League of Arab States Working Group on Non-proliferation and Arms Control set up under the EU-LAS Strategic Dialogue. The Working Group held two meetings in 2016.

The Conference on Disarmament (CD)/Treaty Banning the Production of Fissile Material for Nuclear Weapons or other Nuclear Explosive Devices

25.

The Conference on Disarmament (CD), in accordance with its mandate, plays a crucial role in negotiating multilateral disarmament treaties. The EU is therefore concerned about its continued stalemate.

26.

A clear priority for the EU is the immediate start and early conclusion of negotiations at the Conference on Disarmament of a Treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, on the basis of document CD/1299 and the mandate contained therein. The EU welcomes the report of the Group of Governmental Experts (GGE) which reflects the views expressed and identifies areas of convergence and divergence. The EU fully supports future discussions at the High-Level Preparatory Group, as envisaged in the 71 UNGA First Committee Resolution: ‘General and complete disarmament: treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices’.

27.

The EU calls on all CD Member States to start negotiations on such a Treaty without delay and to begin work on the other issues on the agenda in line with the adopted Programme of Work CD/1864. The EU also encourages all countries possessing nuclear weapons to declare and uphold an immediate moratorium on the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, if they have not already done so. Furthermore, the EU reiterates its longstanding commitment to the enlargement of the Conference.

CHEMICAL WEAPONS

28.

The EU continued to support the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) with voluntary contributions to the Chemical Weapons Convention’s (CWC) core objectives and the Organisation special operations regarding Syria’s chemical weapons programme.

29.

In this respect, the EU supported the OPCW Director-General’s decision that the Fact Finding Mission (FFM) continue its work and that the Declaration Assessment Team continue to examine gaps and discrepancies in the Syrian declarations. The EU welcomed the adoption of UNSCR 2319 (2016) extending by one year the mandate of the OPCW-UN Joint Investigative Mechanism (JIM) established by UNSCR 2235 (2015) to identify the perpetrators of chemical attacks in Syria. By way of Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/2215 (4) adopted on 30 November 2015, the EU has already provided financial support of EUR 4,6 million to the costs associated with the Joint Investigative Mechanism activities under UNSCR 2235 (2015).

30.

The EU also continued monitoring the implementation of EU Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/259 (5) adopted in February 2015 in support of the OPCW core agenda, for the years 2015-2017.

31.

Council Decision 2014/74/CFSP (6) of 10 February 2014 and Council Regulation (EU) No 124/2014 (7) of 10 February 2014 introduced a derogation for the possible use of Syrian frozen assets to cover expenses related to OPCW verification and destruction activities in Syria. In November 2014, the EU addressed a letter to the OPCW Director-General informing him of this possibility and requesting him to approach the Syrian authorities on this matter. The proposal has been transmitted to the Syrian authorities who have rejected it so far. However, the EU continues to refer to this proposal on all appropriate occasions including in the EU statements at the OPCW.

32.

While the initial core objectives of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) such as universality, destruction of remaining chemical weapons stockpiles and national implementation are yet to be fully achieved, the EU and its Member States are looking ahead and starting to reflect on the post-chemical weapons destruction stage. In view of the upcoming 4th CWC Review Conference (December 2018), the EU and its Member States have started to consider future challenges in keeping the organisation relevant (i.e. prohibiting the re-emergence of chemical weapons, the use by non-state actors and terrorists, convergence with biology), and hence supporting the effectiveness of the Convention. In this regard, the EU supported the establishment of the OPCW Open Ended Working Group on the Future Priorities and engaged in drafting an EU common position to contribute to the relevant OPCW debate.

BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS

33.

The EU played a proactive and constructive role in preparations for and deliberations at the 8th Review Conference of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) on 7-25 November 2016 based on the common position set forth in Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/2096 (8) of 16 November 2015. The EU’s strong political and financial commitment to a successful and significant outcome of the 8th Review Conference was underpinned by numerous activities: four regional workshops to support the consensus-building efforts of the President of the Conference (in Astana, Addis Ababa, New Delhi and Brasilia); EU ‘démarches’, including on universal adherence to the Convention; EU working documents; side events and EU statements.

34.

Since 2006 the EU has provided substantive support to BTWC core activities through 4 consecutive assistance programmes. The EU Council Decision (CFSP) 2016/51 (9) adopted on 18 January 2016 sets up the most comprehensive framework in this respect. It provides funding for BTWC projects related to universalisation; regional workshops on science and technology developments relevant to the Convention; national implementation; support for the preparations for the 8th Review Conference; support for the UN Secretary General’s Mechanism for the investigation of alleged use of chemical, biological and toxin weapons; awareness-raising and education. The financial amount for the implementation of the projects for the period from 2016 until 2018 is EUR 2,3 million thus bringing the overall EU support for BTWC core activities to EUR 6,3 million.

BALLISTIC MISSILES

Hague Code of Conduct

35.

The Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCoC) is the result of efforts by the international community to regulate the area of ballistic missiles capable of carrying weapons of mass destruction. The HCoC is the only multilateral transparency and confidence building instrument relating to the spread of ballistic missiles. The EU has strongly supported the Code since its inception. All EU Member States have subscribed to it.

36.

By subscribing to the HCoC, members voluntarily commit themselves politically to provide pre-launch notifications on ballistic missile and space-launch vehicle launches and test flights. Subscribing countries also commit themselves to submitting an annual declaration of their country’s policies on ballistic missiles and space-launch vehicles.

37.

Since the signing and entry into force of the politically-binding HCoC in November 2002 in The Hague, Netherlands, the number of signatories has increased from 93 to 138.

38.

The EU plays a leading role in promoting and supporting the universality, full implementation and enhanced functioning of the HCoC. In December 2014, the EU adopted Council Decision 2014/913/CFSP (10) that provides the means for continued support to The Hague Code of Conduct and to missile non-proliferation in general; its practical implementation started in April 2015. Through this Council Decision, the EU finances HCoC outreach activities, expert meetings and regional awareness sessions. These activities are carried out by the Paris-based Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique (FRS). Recent events organised with EU financial support took place in Cape Town, April 2016, in Vienna, June 2016, in Amman, September 2016, in New York, October 2016 and in Thailand and Myanmar/Burma, November 2016.

39.

In November 2016 EU delegations in a large number of countries were instructed to demarche the relevant authorities of their host countries encouraging them to consider favourably their subscription to the HCoC.

Missile Technology Control Regime

40.

The Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) is an informal political understanding among countries that seek to limit the proliferation of missiles and missile technology. The MTCR guidelines and control lists constitute an international best practices benchmark for controlling exports of missile-related items and technologies.

41.

The 2016 plenary meeting of the MTCR took place in Busan, Republic of Korea, on 19-21 October. The EU delivered an opening statement and a statement on its outreach activities, under its EU-P2P Export Control Programme. Among other topics, the MTCR plenary meeting held an in-depth discussion on individual applications for membership, including those from nine EU Member States. The membership issue will continue to be on the MTCR agenda. An MTCR Reinforced Point of Contact meeting was held in Paris, in March 2016, where the EEAS delivered a comprehensive statement.

CBRN RISK MITIGATION

42.

Substantial political and financial support was given to the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540. The EU shares the objectives of assisting countries in identifying specific technical assistance, raising awareness of relevant programmes of technical assistance, and enhancing cooperation with international and regional organisations to help with national capacity building.

43.

The EU Centres of Excellence initiative on the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear risk mitigation (CBRN) is a worldwide programme currently involving over 55 partner countries financed under the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace (IcSP). Its objective is to mitigate risks related to CBRN materials and nurture a security culture and governance.

44.

The Centres of Excellence network has expanded into a worldwide structure currently clustered around eight Centres of Excellence. Participating countries are supported in their efforts to establish, on a voluntary basis and following a bottom up approach, national and regional coordinating and governance structures. These platforms develop policies and capacities based on specific needs assessments and national action plans. They are supported through several regional cooperation projects funded under the initiative and open to other financing instruments. Since 2010, 55 regional projects have been financed. The budget for the initiative for the 10 –year period starting in 2010 amounts to EUR 250 million.

45.

The Centres of Excellence network is now well developed, allowing the EU to take further initiatives to address security governance issues related to cybercrime, terrorism, critical infrastructures, falsified medicines, hybrid threats and explosives, and to further develop cooperation on nuclear forensics, border control and export control of dual use items. This approach has also been suggested by the European Court of Auditors (11) followed by Council Conclusions on 26 October 2015 (12).

46.

The 2009 EU CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) Action Plan had to be implemented by the end of 2015. Towards the end of that year, the Commission undertook to review its level of implementation. The review was done by the Commission and the Member States. The main EU achievements include the opening of the EU Nuclear Security Training Facility for the detection of and response to illicit acts with nuclear and other radioactive materials, the development of a database of the CBRN-E Glossary and the organisation of numerous multinational and/or cross-border training courses and exercises. The 2nd Progress Report will be published shortly.

47.

A new strategic document exploring the security dimension of the CBRN policy will be released in the first half of 2017. The priorities of the new communication will be developed in close cooperation with key stakeholders, including Member State representatives in the CBRN-E Advisory Group. It will probably follow the structure of the European Agenda on Security and will focus on better usage of existing tools for exchanging information, enhanced operational cooperation and close cooperation with key international partners. There will be also a strong emphasis on supporting actions such as training and research. The Commission will continue to provide financial support to projects in the CBRN area via the Internal Security Fund–Police.

48.

The CBRN Action Plan has received scientific and technical support from a range of research projects funded by the Secure Society Programme under the 7th Framework Programme. The research covers the entire crisis management cycle from prevention to recovery. Activities to identify standardisation needs could lead to ‘European Norms’ (EN) standards. The Horizon 2020 programme will strengthen on-going work in CBRN research through focused topics.

THINK TANKS

49.

Based on Council Decision 2010/430/CFSP (13) of 26 July 2010, the implementation of the EU strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction has been actively supported by the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium which started its activities in January 2011. Under Council Decision 2014/129/CFSP (14) adopted on 10 March 2014 the activities of the Consortium are being extended for a further three years by building on the achievements to date and by adding new and innovative projects.

50.

The Consortium’s activities increased EU visibility vis-à-vis third countries and civil society and contributed substantially to EU policy shaping in the areas of non-proliferation and disarmament. The Consortium provides a platform for informal contacts among practitioners and stimulates dialogue between different stakeholders. Its activities have helped raise awareness of the challenges posed by nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. It has an extensive network of 73 think tanks across Europe.

51.

The 5th EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Conference, hosted by the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium, took place on 3-4 November 2016 in Brussels. It was the largest so far with over 300 participants from 70 countries and international organisations

UNITED NATIONS SECURITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION 1540 AND EXPORT CONTROLS

UNSCR 1540

52.

The UN Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) continues to be a central pillar of the international non-proliferation architecture. It is the first international instrument to deal in an integrated and comprehensive manner with weapons of mass destruction, their means of delivery and related materials. UNSCR 1540 (2004) establishes binding obligations on all countries. They aim to prevent and deter non-State actors from obtaining access to such weapons and weapon-related materials. Adopted under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Resolution requires all countries to adopt the necessary legislation barring non-state actors from getting nuclear, chemical or biological weapons, and to establish appropriate domestic controls for related materials to prevent their illicit trafficking.

53.

In 2016, the 1540 Committee carried out, as mandated by UNSC resolution 1977 (2011), a comprehensive review on the status of implementation of resolution 1540 (2004). In this exercise the Committee interacted with the UN membership, international organisations, academics, industry and parliamentarians. The EU participated actively in this review process, e.g. the EU set out its activities in support of UNSCR 1540 in a report addressed to the 1540 Committee and formulated a series of recommendations for the future development of the Resolution. Many of these recommendations were included in the report on the comprehensive review that the 1540 Committee submitted to the UNSC, and in the subsequent UNSC Resolution 2325 (2016) adopted on 15 December 2016.

54.

Over the last decade, the EU has provided, through a successful multiannual funding scheme, a substantial amount to the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA). The EU support was provided through Council Joint Actions adopted in 2006 and 2008 respectively and a Council Decision adopted in 2013. This support to the UNODA, provided by the EU as part of its Common Foreign and Security Policy, was intended to:

a.

boost national and regional efforts and capacity building in close cooperation with other EU programmes to ensure synergies and complementarity;

b.

contribute to the practical implementation of UNSCR 1540, in particular on technical assistance, international cooperation and raising public awareness;

c.

help countries develop and implement national action plans, when they request this.

55.

The most recent Council Decision in this regard was adopted in 2013 and expired in April 2016. The EU has prepared for adoption in 2017 a new Council Decision in support of UNSCR 1540 implementation and universality, taking into account the outcome and recommendations of the comprehensive review conducted in 2016.

56.

In 2016, the EU carried out targeted outreach work through its network of EU delegations in the 17 countries yet to submit a first report to the 1540 Committee. The EU outreach effort was well received in a number of countries and will give rise to EU follow-up support action at the request of and in partnership with the countries concerned.

Export controls

57.

In 2016 the EU continued to regularly update its regulations to reflect developments in multilateral export control regimes. Thus, Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2016/1969 (15) of 12 September 2016 updated the EU control list in line with decisions taken in multilateral export control regimes in 2015, and introduced changes to e.g. the control of laser measuring systems and electronic equipment that can perform high-speed analogue-to-digital conversions

58.

The Dual-Use Coordination Group continued to support the effective and consistent implementation of export controls in the EU. New functionalities were introduced to the ‘Dual-Use Electronic System’ which improved information and technical exchanges within the EU. The EU adopted guidance notes for the effective implementation of specific control parameters e.g. concerning encryption products. An annual report (16) was published to ensure transparency regarding export control and licensing activities.

59.

A review of EU export control policy was initiated. The European Commission adopted a proposal for modernising EU export controls (17) and their adaptation to rapidly changing technological, economic and political circumstances. The proposal has been transmitted to the European Parliament and the Council for discussion under ordinary legislative procedure.

60.

EU positions and statements were coordinated as appropriate in preparation for the relevant meetings of the export control regimes: the Nuclear Suppliers Group Plenary meeting in Seoul (23-24 June 2016); the Australia Group Plenary meeting in Paris (9 June 2016); and the Missile Technology Control Regime Plenary meeting in Busan (17-21 October 2016).

61.

The implementation of the EU P2P Export Control Outreach programme to enhance the effectiveness of export control systems of dual-use items and related materials, equipment and technologies continued. The programme currently covers 34 countries from six regions. In September 2015 it was extended to enable cooperation with new partner countries. New activities were implemented in Morocco, Tunisia, Jordan, Ukraine, Georgia and in the UAE. EU long-term experts were dispatched to Kazakhstan and Jordan to strengthen ties with partner countries. A special programme was set up in South East Asia.

62.

Intensive coordination of the EU P2P Export Control Outreach programme with the US Department of State Export Control and Related Border Security Programme continued. Joint EU-US table top exercises were organised to stimulate cross-border cross-regional cooperation between export control authorities. An annual EU summer university course on non-proliferation and export control was established in the framework of the European Forum Alpbach. The EU P2P Outreach portal (https://export-control.jrc.ec.europa.eu/) continued to serve as a platform for all EU outreach programmes on export control of military and dual-use goods, with the aim of customising information exchange with the EU partner countries. The programme is funded under the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace.

SPACE

63.

The EU and its Member States are increasingly important users of outer space. The EU has developed two ambitious space programmes, Galileo and Copernicus, which complement national space programmes. The EU also benefits from the European space programmes of its Member States and the European Space Agency. The Global Strategy for the European Union’s Foreign and Security Policy of June 2016 therefore reconfirmed the long-standing EU commitment to promote international cooperation in outer space and to promoting space security and sustainability: ‘In space, we will promote the autonomy and security of our space-based services and work on principles for responsible space behaviour, which could lead to the adoption of an international voluntary code of conduct’.

64.

In October 2016, the EU issued a new Space Strategy for Europe, which sets out Europe’s ambitions in space and confirms that the EU continues to be an active and globally engaged partner. Based on the values and principles enshrined in UN treaties, the EU continues to work with its Member States and partners to promote international principles of responsible behaviour in outer space and to protect the sustainable and peaceful use of space by all nations.

65.

The EU and its Member States will show continued commitment in these areas, which are important to our security and our prosperity.

WMD NON-PROLIFERATION CLAUSES

66.

The EU continued, in accordance with its WMD non-proliferation strategy, to mainstream the non-proliferation of WMD into its contractual relations with third countries. Further negotiations took place on WMD non-proliferation clauses in relevant agreements between the EU and third countries. Negotiations were successfully concluded with Cuba and Malaysia, while negotiations with Japan and Armenia made good progress. Furthermore, preparations and consultations took place on the upcoming discussions with Mercosur and Mexico in early 2017. Negotiations help raise awareness of EU non-proliferation and disarmament policies. They also provide a forum to increase mutual understanding, identify possibilities for future cooperation and encourage concrete progress in non-proliferation and disarmament.

OTHER MULTILATERAL FORA

G7

67.

The EU continued to participate actively in the meetings of the G7 Non-Proliferation Directors Group (NPDG) which in 2016 were held under Japanese Presidency. The highlight was the adoption on 11 April 2016 of the G7 Foreign Ministers Hiroshima Declaration on Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation.

68.

The EU is also committed to the Global Partnership against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (GP), in particular through the technical assistance (threat assessment, national action plans) provided worldwide by the EU Centres of Excellence initiative on the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear risk mitigation. The EU recognises that GP programmes and activities to combat WMD terrorism are closely related to the Nuclear Security Summit process, the BTWC Review Conference and UNSCR 1540 Comprehensive Review. In this regard, the EU welcomes the continuous expansion of the GP beyond the G7; the Partnership currently includes 30 active members, five of which have EU Regional Secretariats.

POLITICAL DIALOGUE MEETINGS

69.

The EEAS Special Envoy for Disarmament and Non-proliferation Mr Jacek Bylica held non-proliferation and disarmament dialogue meetings with India, Japan, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, the US and Israel. He conducted numerous bilateral consultations with various stakeholders in the margins of major fora such as the UNGA First Committee, the IAEA General Conference, the BTWC Review Conference and the CWC Conference of States Parties. Bilateral consultations were held with the UN High Representative for Disarmament Affairs, the Director-General of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the UNIDIR Director, among others.


(1)  OJ L 281, 23.10.2013, p. 6.

(2)  OJ L 308, 16.11.2016, p. 22.

(3)  OJ L 172, 2.7.2009, p. 18.

(4)  OJ L 314, 1.12.2015, p. 51.

(5)  OJ L 43, 18.2.2015, p. 14.

(6)  OJ L 40, 11.2.2014, p. 63.

(7)  OJ L 40, 11.2.2014, p. 8.

(8)  OJ L 303, 20.11.2015, p. 13.

(9)  OJ L 12, 19.1.2016, p. 50.

(10)  OJ L 360, 17.12.2014, p. 44.

(11)  Court of Auditors Special Report 17/2014

(12)  Council conclusions of 26 October 2015 (13279/15)

(13)  OJ L 202, 4.8.2010, p. 5.

(14)  OJ L 71, 12.3.2014, p. 3.

(15)  OJ L 307, 15.11.2016, p. 1.

(16)  COM(2016) 521 of 24 August 2016.

(17)  COM(2016) 616 of 28 September 2016.


ANNEX I

OVERVIEW OF EU COUNCIL JOINT ACTIONS AND COUNCIL DECISIONS IN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE EUROPEAN UNION STRATEGY AGAINST THE PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

 

Title

Objective and implementing entity

Budget and duration

1.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2016/2383 of 21 December 2016 on the Union support for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) activities in the area of nuclear security and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The support provided for the nuclear security activities of the IAEA aims to:

a)

ensure the sustainability and effectiveness of support provided through previous Joint Actions and Decisions;

b)

strengthen countries indigenous nuclear security support infrastructure;

c)

strengthen countries legislative and regulatory framework;

d)

strengthen nuclear security systems and measures for nuclear and other radioactive materials;

e)

strengthen countries institutional infrastructure and capabilities to deal with nuclear and radioactive materials out of regulatory control;

f)

strengthen countries response and resilience to cybercrime and mitigate its impact on nuclear security;

g)

enhance education and training capacities in the field of nuclear security;

h)

provide focused and continuing support for the implementation and universal adherence to the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material.

Implementing agency: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 9 361 204,23

OJ L 352, 23.12.2016, p. 74

Estimated duration of the action: 36 months

2.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2016/2001 of 15 November 2016 on a Union contribution to the establishment and the secure management of a Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Bank under the control of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the framework of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The contribution provides support for the safe and secure operation and management of the IAEA LEU Bank by ensuring high levels of security and safety during transport and storage, in line with the IAEA safety standards and security guidance documents. It provides support for:

a)

the safe and secure establishment of storage for the 90 tonnes of LEU;

b)

the secure transport of 90 tonnes of LEU;

c)

the long term storage of the 90 tonnes of LEU

Implementing agency: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 4 362 200

OJ L 308, 16.11.2016, p. 22

Estimated duration of the action: 60 months after the date of the conclusion of the financing agreement

3.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2016/51 of 18 January 2016 in support of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) in the framework of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The contribution provides support for:

a)

promoting universal adherence to the BTWC by encouraging States not party to better understand the benefits of joining the BTWC and getting more involved in BTWC meetings and other activities,

b)

enhancing interaction with non-governmental stakeholders on science and technology and biosafety and biosecurity,

c)

developing national capacities for BTWC implementation — in particular in developing countries, and on areas such as Articles VII and X — by improving the quality and quantity of declarations submitted under the Confidence-Building Measures system in order to enhance confidence in compliance with the BTWC,

d)

supporting the intersessional programme and the preparations for the Eighth Review Conference,

e)

strengthening the United Nations Secretary-General’s Mechanism for Investigation of Alleged Use of Chemical, Biological and Toxin Weapons (SGM),

f)

enabling tools for awareness-raising, education and engagement.

Implementing agency: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 2 340 000

OJ L 12, 19.1.2016, p. 50

Estimated duration of the action: 36 months from the conclusion of the financing agreement.

4.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/2215 of 30 November 2015 in support of UNSCR 2235 (2015), establishing an OPCW-UN joint investigative mechanism to identify the perpetrators of chemical attacks in the Syrian Arab Republic

The decision supported the OPCW and the JIM by contributing to costs associated with their activities under UNSCR 2235 (2015), with the following overall objective: identification to the greatest extent feasible of individuals, entities, groups or governments who were perpetrators, organisers, sponsors or otherwise involved in the use of chemicals, including chlorine or any other toxic chemical, as weapons in the Syrian Arab Republic, where the OPCW FFM determines or has determined that a specific incident in the Syrian Arab Republic involved or likely involved the use of chemicals, including chlorine or any other toxic chemical, as weapons.

Implementing agency: The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 2 290 463

OJ L 314, 1.12.2015, p. 51

Estimated duration of the action: 18 months from the conclusion of the financing agreement.

5.

Implementing agency: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 2 295 632

OJ L 314, 1.12.2015, p. 51

Estimated duration of the action: 18 months from the conclusion of the financing agreement.

6.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/1838 of 12 October 2015 amending Decision 2013/391/CFSP in support of the practical implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) on non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery

Decision 2013/391/CFSP was amended as follows: (1) in Article 5, paragraph 2 was replaced by the following: ‘2. This Decision shall expire on 25 April 2016.’ (2) in the Annex, point 6 was replaced by the following: ‘6. DURATION This Decision will expire on 25 April 2016.’

Implementing agency: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 750 000

OJ L 266, 13.10.2015. p. 96

Duration of the action:

1)

CD 2013/391/CFSP (row 65): 24 months;

2)

CD2015/1838/CFSP: extended it until 25 April 2016.

7.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/1837 of 12 October 2015 on Union support for the activities of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) in order to strengthen its monitoring and verification capabilities and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The sixth Council Decision supports the CTBT Organisation, without substituting actions/projects funded through the regular budget, a) in its technical pillars to enhance the technical and scientific capacity of the PTS and b) in its capacity to promote the universal adherence and entry-into-force of the Treaty and the verification regime through training and educational activities. The projects aim to:

a)

sustain the operability of the CTBTO verification system;

b)

expand the capabilities of the Multispectral/Infrared (MSIR) system, developed by the PTS under EU Council Decision V, by adding dedicated sensors to help inspection teams detect OSI-relevant features;

c)

promote universal adherence and the entry into force of the Treaty and the long term sustainability of its verification regime through outreach activities and capacity building.

Implementing agency: The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

Budget: EUR 3 024 756

OJ L 266, 13.10.2015, p. 83

Duration of the action: 24 months from the conclusion of the financial agreement.

8.

Council Decision 2015/259/CFSP of 17 February 2015 in support of activities of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The EU Council Decision 2015/259/CFSP for the years 2015-17 has made available to the OPCW some EUR 2,5  million to support:

a)

universality,

b)

national implementation,

c)

international cooperation,

d)

the Africa Programme and

e)

implementation of lessons learned from the Syrian operation.

Implementing agency: The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 2 528 069

OJ L 43, 18.2.2015, p. 14

Duration of the action: 36 months

9.

Council Decision (CFSP) 2015/203 of 9 February 2015 in support of the Union proposal for an international Code of Conduct for outer- space activities as a contribution to transparency and confidence building measures in outer-space activities

The objective was to promote the proposal for an international Code of Conduct on outer-space activities as a contribution to the creation of TCBMs in outer-space activities in line with UNGA Resolution A/RES/68/50, while building on the lessons-learned from Council Decision 2012/281/CFSP.

The projects supported by the EU aimed to:

a)

enhance awareness, knowledge and understanding of the proposal for an international Code of Conduct and the process led by the European Union.

b)

continue to provide a framework for the multilateral process on the proposal for an international Code of Conduct for outer-space activities, that will enable the international community to continue to engage with a view to building the widest possible consensus for adoption of the Code of Conduct, through supporting multilateral meetings for negotiations on the draft Code, and for its formal adoption.

Implementing agency: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA)

Budget: EUR 775 729

OJ L 33, 10.2.2015, p. 38

Duration of the action: 18 months

10.

Council Decision 2014/913/CFSP of 15 December 2014 in support of the HCoC and ballistic missile Non-Proliferation in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The objectives were to:

1.

Support the Hague Code of Conduct against ballistic missile proliferation and the Missile Technology Control Regime, in particular with the aim to:

a)

promote universality and the subscription to the Code by all States with ballistic missile capabilities;

b)

support the implementation and reinforce the visibility of the Code;

c)

promote adherence to the MTCR guidelines and its annex.

2.

More generally, to support a range of activities to fight against the proliferation of ballistic missiles, aimed notably at raising awareness of this threat, stepping up efforts to increase the effectiveness of multilateral instruments, building up support to initiatives to address these specific challenges and helping interested countries to reinforce nationally their relevant export control regimes.

Implementing agency: Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique (FRS).

Budget: EUR 990 000

OJ L 360, 17.12.2014, p. 44

Duration of the action: 30 months

11.

Council Decision 2014/129/CFSP of 10 March 2014 promoting the European network of independent non-proliferation think tanks in support of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The Council Decision continued the support to the Consortium of think-tanks. It built on the achievements and experiences since 2011. New tasks were added, among which:

a)

annual international conference on non-proliferation and disarmament (3 in total; 250-300 targeted participants, international in scope, held in Brussels)

b)

annual consultative meeting on non-proliferation and disarmament (3 in total, 100 targeted participants, European in scope, held in Brussels)

c)

internet platform and production of policy papers;

d)

ad hoc seminars;

e)

help-desk facility for production within two weeks-time of up to twenty 5-10 pages policy papers on demand by EEAS;

f)

education on non-proliferation and disarmament (European online curriculum for university use to be available 24 months after the starting of the contract).

Implementing agency: The EU Non-Proliferation Consortium of Think-Tanks.

Budget: EUR 3 600 000

OJ L 71, 12.3.2014, p. 3

Duration of the action: 36 months

12.

Council Decision 2013/726/CFSP of 9 December 2013 in support of the UNSCR 2118 (2013) and OPCW Executive Council EC-M-33/Dec 1, in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The overall objective was to support the OPCW activities by contributing to costs associated with the inspection and verification of the destruction of Syrian chemical weapons, and costs associated with activities complementary to the core mandated tasks in support of UNSCR 2118 (2013) and the OPCW Executive Council Decision of 27 September 2013 on the destruction of Syrian chemical weapons and subsequent and related resolutions and decisions. The project under the Council Decision provided situation-awareness products: satellite imagery and related information products of the EU Satellite Centre, related to the security of the OPCW-UN Joint Mission, including the status of the road network.

Implementing agency: The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 2 311 842

OJ L 329, 10.12.2013, p. 41

Duration of the action: 12 months. Extended until 30 September 2015.

Implemented.

13.

Council Decision 2013/668/CFSP of 18 November 2013 in support of World Health Organisation activities in the area of bio-safety and bio-security in the framework of the European Union Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The overall objective was to support the implementation of the BTWC focusing on the safety and security of microbial or other biological agents or toxins in laboratories and other facilities, including during transportation and to promote bio-risk reduction practices and awareness, including biosafety, biosecurity, bioethics and preparedness against intentional misuse of biological agents and toxins.

Implementing entity: The World Health Organisation (WTO).

Budget: EUR 1 727 000

OJ L 310, 20.11.2013

Duration of the action: 24 months

14.

Council Decision 2013/517/CFSP of 21 October 2013 on the Union support for the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — IAEA VI

The overall aim was to support the IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification to:

(a)

promote universal adherence to international non-proliferation and nuclear security instruments, including IAEA comprehensive safeguards agreements and additional protocols;

(b)

protect proliferation-sensitive materials and equipment and the relevant technology by providing legislative and regulatory assistance in the area of nuclear security and safeguards;

(c)

strengthen the detection of, and response to, illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials.

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 8 050 000

OJ L 281, 23.10.2013, p. 6

Duration of the action: 36 months

15.

Council Decision 2013/391/CFSP of 22 July 2013 in support of the practical implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) on non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery

The support focused on:

(a)

enhancing relevant national and regional efforts and capabilities primarily through capacity-building and assistance facilitation;

(b)

contributing to the practical implementation of specific recommendations of the 2009 Comprehensive Review of the status of implementation of UNSCR 1540 (2004), in particular in the areas of technical assistance, international cooperation and raising public awareness;

(c)

initiating, developing and implementing national action plans upon states request.

Implementing entity: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 750 000

OJ L 198, 23.7.2013

Duration of the action: 24 months.

16.

Council Decision 2012/699/CFSP of 13 November 2012 on support for activities of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) in order to strengthen its monitoring and verification capabilities and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — CTBTO V.

The Union supported four projects, the objectives of which were to:

(a)

provide technical assistance and capacity building to State Signatories to enable them to fully participate in and contribute to the implementation of the CTBT verification system;

(b)

develop capacity for future generations of CTBT experts through the Capacity Development Initiative (CDI);

(c)

enhance the Atmospheric Transport Model (ATM);

(d)

characterize and mitigate Radio Xenon noble gases;

(e)

support the Integrated Field Exercise in 2014 (IFE14) through the development of an integrated multispectral array;

(f)

sustain certified IMS Auxiliary Seismic Stations.

Implementing entity: The Preparatory Commission of the CTBTO.

Budget: EUR 5 185 028

OJ L 314, 14.11.2012

Duration of the action: 24 months. Extended to 3 December 2015.

Implemented

17.

Council Decision 2012/423/CFSP of 23 July 2012 on support of ballistic missile non-proliferation in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and of the Council Common Position 2003/805/CFSP

The objectives were to:

(a)

support the activities of The Hague Code of Conduct against ballistic missile proliferation, in particular with the aim to:

promote the universality of the Code and the subscription to the Code by all States with ballistic missile capabilities;

support the implementation of the Code;

reinforce the visibility of the Code on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of its signature;

(b)

support a range of activities to fight against the proliferation of ballistic missiles, step up efforts to increase the effectiveness of multilateral instruments, build up support for initiatives addressing these specific challenges and help interested countries to reinforce nationally their relevant export control regimes.

Implementing entity: Fondation pour le Recherche Stratégique (FRS).

Budget: EUR 930 000

OJ L 196, 24.7.2012

Duration of the action: 24 months. Extended to 28 March 2015.

Implemented

18.

Council Decision 2012/422/CFSP of 23 July 2012 in support of a process leading to the establishment of a zone free of nuclear weapons and all other weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East.

The objectives were to:

(a)

support the work of the Facilitator for the 2012 Conference on the establishment of a Middle East zone free of nuclear weapons and all other weapons of mass destruction;

(b)

enhance the visibility of the Union as a global actor and in the region in the field of non-proliferation;

(c)

encourage regional political and security-related dialogue within civil societies and governments, and more particularly among experts, officials and academics;

(d)

identify concrete confidence-building measures that could serve as practical steps towards the prospect of a Middle East zone free of WMD and their means of delivery;

(e)

encourage discussion on the universalization and implementation of relevant international treaties and other instruments to prevent the proliferation of WMD and their delivery systems;

(f)

discuss issues related to peaceful uses of nuclear energy and international and regional cooperation.

Implementing entity: EU Non-Proliferation Consortium.

Budget: EUR 352 000

OJ L 196, 24.7.2012

Duration of the action: 18 months.

A contingency amount of EUR 20 000 was given to the Arab Institute for Security Studies in Amman, Jordan for organising a meeting on the subject of the WMDFZ in the M.E. (13-14 November 2013).

Implemented.

19.

Council Decision 2012/421/CFSP of 23 July 2012 in support of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), in the framework of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The objectives were to:

(a)

promote universal adherence to the BTWC,

(b)

support the implementation of the BTWC and the submission of CBMs by the States Parties,

(c)

support the work of the 2012-2015 inter-sessional programme with a view to strengthening the implementation and effectiveness of the BTWC.

Implementing entity: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 1 700 000

OJ L 196, 24.7.2012

Duration of the action: 24 months. Extended to 31 January 2015.

Implemented

20.

Council Decision 2012/281/CFSP of 29 May 2012 in the framework of the European Security Strategy in support of the Union proposal for an international Code of Conduct on outer-space activities.

The objectives were:

(a)

consultations with States, active or not yet active on space issues to discuss the proposal and to gather their views,

(b)

gathering expert support for the process of developing an international Code of Conduct for outer-space activities.

Implementing entity: United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR).

Budget: EUR 1 490 000

OJ L 140, 30.5.2012

Duration of the action: 18 months. Extended to 31 July 2014.

Implemented.

21.

Council Decision 2012/166/CFSP of 23 March 2012 in support of activities of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — V.

The objectives were to:

(a)

enhance the capacities of States Parties in fulfilling their obligations under the CWC,

(b)

enhance the preparedness of States Parties to prevent and respond to attacks involving toxic chemicals,

(c)

enhance international cooperation in the field of chemical activities,

(d)

support the ability of the OPCW to adapt to developments in the field of science and technology,

(e)

promote universality by encouraging States not Parties to join the CWC.

Implementing entity: The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 2 140 000

OJ L 87, 24.3.2012

Duration of the action: 24 months. Extended to 31 December 2014

Implemented

22.

Council Decision 2010/799/CFSP of 13 December 2010 in support of a process of confidence-building leading to the establishment of a zone free of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery in the Middle East in support of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The objectives were to:

(a)

encourage regional political and security-related dialogue within civil societies and governments, and among experts, officials and academics,

(b)

identify confidence-building measures that could serve as practical steps towards the prospect of a Middle East zone free of WMD and their means of delivery,

(c)

encourage discussion on the universalization and implementation of relevant international treaties and other instruments to prevent the proliferation of WMD and their delivery systems,

(d)

discuss issues related to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and international and regional cooperation in this regard.

Implementing entity: EU Non-Proliferation Consortium.

Budget: EUR 347 700

OJ L 341, 23.12.2012, p. 27

Implemented.

23.

Council Decision 2010/585/CFSP of 27 September 2010 on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — IAEA V.

The objectives were:

(a)

strengthening national legislative and regulatory infrastructures for the implementation of relevant international instruments in the areas of nuclear security and verification, including comprehensive safeguards agreements and the Additional Protocol,

(b)

assisting States in strengthening the security and control of nuclear and other radioactive materials,

(c)

strengthening States’ capabilities for detection and response to illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials.

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 9 966 000

OJ L 302, 1.10.2010

Duration of the action: 24 months. Extended to 31 December 2014.

Implemented.

24.

Council Decision 2010/430/CFSP of 26 July 2010 establishing a European network of independent non-proliferation think tanks in support of the implementation of the EU strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The objective of this network of independent non-proliferation think tanks was to encourage political and security-related dialogue and the long-term discussion of measures to combat the WMD proliferation and their delivery systems within civil society, and among experts, researchers and academics. The support for the network focused on:

(a)

organising a kick-off meeting and an annual conference with a view to submitting a report and/or recommendations to the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (HR),

(b)

creating an internet platform to facilitate contacts and foster research dialogue among the network of non-proliferation think tanks.

Implementing entity: EU Non-Proliferation Consortium.

Budget: EUR 2 182 000

OJ L 205, 4.8.2010

Duration of the action: 36 months. Extended to 30 June 2014.

Implemented

25.

Council Decision 2010/461/CFSP of 26 July 2010 on support for activities of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) in order to strengthen its monitoring and verification capabilities and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — CTBTO IV.

The objectives were to:

(a)

improve the operation and sustainability of the auxiliary seismic stations network of the CTBT’s International Monitoring System;

(b)

improve the CTBT verification system through strengthened cooperation with the scientific community;

(c)

provide technical assistance to States Signatories in Africa and in the Latin American and Caribbean Region so as to enable them to fully participate in and contribute to the implementation of the CTBT verification system;

(d)

develop an OSI noble gas capable detection system.

Implementing entity: The Preparatory Commission of the CTBTO.

Budget: EUR 5 280 000

OJ L 219, 20.8.2010

Duration of the action: 18 months. Extended to 16 May 2014.

Implemented

26.

Council Decision 2009/569/CFSP of 27 July 2009 on support for OPCW activities in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction: OPCW IV.

The objective was to support universal adherence to the CWC, to promote ratification/accession to the CWC by States not Parties (signatory States as well as non-signatory States) and to support the full implementation of the CWC by the States Parties:

Implementing entity: The Organisation for the Prohibition of the Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 2 110 000

OJ L 197, 29.7.2009

Duration of the action: 18 months.

Implemented.

27.

Council Decision 2008/974/CFSP of 18 December 2008 in support of the Hague Code of Conduct against ballistic missile proliferation in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The EU supported three aspects of the Code:

(a)

universality of the Code,

(b)

implementation of the Code,

(c)

improved functioning of the Code.

Implementing entity: Fondation pour le Recherche Stratégique (FRS).

Budget: EUR 1 015 000

OJ L 345, 23.12.2008

Duration of the action: 24 months.

Implemented.

28.

Council Joint Action 2008/858/CFSP of 10 November 2008 in support of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

The overall objective was to:

(a)

support universal adherence to the BTWC,

(b)

improve implementation of the BTWC, including the submission of confidence building measures declarations, and

(c)

support the best use of the inter-sessional process 2007-2010 for the preparation of the 2011 Review Conference.

Implementing entity: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA) — Geneva.

Budget: EUR 1 400 000

OJ L 302, 13.11.2008

Duration of the action: 24 months.

Implemented.

29.

Council Joint Action 2008/588/CFSP of 15 July 2008 on support for activities of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) in order to strengthen its monitoring and verification capabilities and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — CTBTO III.

The EU supported the building of capacity of the Preparatory Commission of the CTBTO in the area of verification by:

(a)

noble gas monitoring: radio-xenon measurements and data analysis,

(b)

integrating States Signatories in Africa to fully participate in and contribute to the implementation of the CTBTO monitoring and verification system.

Implementing entity: The CTBTO Preparatory Commission.

Budget: EUR 2 316 000

OJ L 189, 17.7.2008

Duration of the action: 18 months.

Implemented.

30.

Council Joint Action 2008/368/CFSP of 14 May 2008 in support of the implementation of UNSCR 1540.

The projects in support of the implementation of UNSCR 1540 were six workshops aiming at enhancing the capacity of export-control officials in six sub regions: Africa, Central America, Mercosur, the Middle East and Gulf Regions, Pacific Islands and South-East Asia — to implement UNSCR 1540 in practice. The workshops were tailored for border, customs and regulatory officials and contained the main elements of an export control process including applicable laws (including national and international legal aspects), regulatory controls (including licensing provisions, end-user verification and awareness-raising programmes) and enforcement (including commodity identification, risk-assessment and detection methods).

Implementing entity: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 475 000

OJ L 127, 15.5.2008

Duration of the action: 24 months.

Implemented.

31.

Council Joint Action 2008/314/CFSP of 14 April 2008 on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction– IAEA IV.

The objectives were to:

(a)

strengthen national legislative and regulatory infrastructures for the implementation of relevant international instruments in the areas of nuclear security and verification, including comprehensive safeguards agreements and the Additional Protocol,

(b)

assist States in strengthening the security and control of nuclear and other radioactive materials,

(c)

strengthen States’ capabilities for detection and response to illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials.

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 7 703 000

OJ L 107, 17.4.2008

Duration of the action: 24 months.

Implemented.

32.

Council Joint Action 2008/307/CFSP of 14 April 2008 in support of World Health Organisation activities in the area of laboratory bio-safety and bio-security — WHO I.

The overall objective was to support the implementation of the BTWC, in particular those aspects that relate to the safety and security of microbial or other biological agents and toxins in laboratories and other facilities, including during transportation as appropriate, to prevent unauthorised access to and removal of such agents and toxins. The contribution aimed to:

(a)

promote bio-risk reduction management through regional and national outreach,

(b)

strengthen the security and laboratory management practices against biological risks.

Implementing entity: The World Health Organisation (WTO).

Budget: EUR 2 105 000

OJ L 106, 16.4.2008

Duration of the action: 24 months.

Implemented.

33.

Council Joint Action 2007/753/CFSP of 19 November 2007 in support of the IAEA monitoring and verification activities in the DPRK.

The objective was to contribute to the monitoring and verification activities in the DPRK, in accordance with the Initial Actions of 13 February 2007, as agreed in the framework of the six-party-talks.

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA — Department of Safeguards)

Budget: EUR 1 780 000

OJ L 304, 22.11.2007

Estimated duration of the action: 18 months. Suspension, Force majeure. Ended

34.

Council Joint Action 2007/468/CFSP of 28 June 2007 of 28 June 2007 on support for activities of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) in order to strengthen its monitoring and verification capabilities and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction CTBTO II.

The objective was to support the early entry into force of the Treaty, and the establishing of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime through:

(a)

improvement of the knowledge of Provisional Technical Secretariat noble gas measurements;

(b)

support for the Integrated Field Exercise 2008.

Implementing entity: The CTBTO Preparatory Commission.

Budget: EUR 1 670 000

OJ L 176, 6.7.2007

Duration of the action: 15 months.

Implemented.

35.

Council Joint Action 2007/185/CFSP of 19 March 2007 on support for OPCW activities in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — OPCW III.

The objective was to support universal adherence to the CWC, to promote ratification/accession to the CWC by States not Parties (signatory States as well as non-signatory States) and to support the full implementation of the CWC by the States Parties. The contribution also promoted international cooperation in the field of chemical activities, as accompanying measures to the implementation of the CWC and provided support for the creation of a collaborative framework among the chemical industry, OPCW and national authorities on the 10th anniversary of the OPCW.

Implementing entity: The Organisation for the Prohibition of the Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 1 700 000

OJ L 85, 27.3.2007

Duration of the action: 18 months.

Implemented.

36.

Council Joint Action 2007/178/CFSP of 19 March 2007 in support of chemical weapons destruction in the Russian Federation in the framework of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — Russian Federation IV.

The objective was to assist the Russian Federation in destroying some of its chemical weapons as required by the CWC. This Joint Action supported the completion of the electricity supply infrastructure at Shchuch’ye chemical weapon destruction facility.

Implementing entity: The Ministry of Defence of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

Budget: EUR 3 145 000

OJ L 81, 22.3.2007

Duration of the action: 18 months. Implemented.

37.

Council Joint Action 2006/418/CFSP of 12 June 2006 on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — IAEA III.

The objective was to strengthen nuclear security in selected countries focusing on:

(a)

legislative and regulatory assistance;

(b)

strengthening the security and control of nuclear and other radioactive materials;

(c)

strengthening of countries capabilities for detection and response to illicit trafficking.

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 6 995 000

OJ L 165, 17.6.2006

Duration of the action: 15 months.

Implemented.

38.

Council Joint Action 2006/419/CFSP of 12 June 2006 in support of the implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540 (2004) and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The action aimed at addressing three aspects:

(a)

awareness-raising of requirements and obligations under the Resolution,

(b)

strengthening national capacities in three target regions: Africa, Latin America and Caribbean, Asia-Pacific, in drafting national reports on the implementation of UNSC Resolution 1540 (2004) and

(c)

sharing experience from the adoption of national measures required for the implementation of the Resolution.

Implementing entity: United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA).

Budget: EUR 195 000

OJ L 165, 17.6.2006

Duration of the action: 22 months.

Implemented.

39.

Council Joint Action 2006/243/CFSP of 20 March 2006 on support for activities of the Preparatory Commission of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) in the area of training and capacity building for verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — CTBTO I.

The objective was to improve the capacity of CTBT Signatory States to fulfil their verification responsibilities and to enable them to fully benefit from participation in the treaty regime with the help of a computer-based training/self-study.

Implementing entity: The CTBTO Preparatory Commission.

Budget: EUR 1 133 000

OJ L 88, 25.3.2006

Duration of the action: 15 months. Implemented.

40.

Council Joint Action 2006/184/CFSP of 27 February 2006 in support of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, in the framework of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The objective was to support universal adherence to the BTWC, promote accession to the BTWC by States not Party (signatory States as well as non-signatory States) and support the implementation of the BTWC by States Parties.

Implementing entity: The Graduate Institute of International Studies (GIIS), Geneva.

Budget: EUR 867 000

OJ L 65, 7.3.2006

Duration of the action: 18 months. Implemented.

41.

Council Joint Action 2005/913/CFSP of 12 December 2005 on support for OPCW activities in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — OPCW II.

The objective was to support universal adherence to the CWC and accession to the CWC by States not Party (signatory States as well as non-signatory States) and the implementation of the CWC by States Parties. The contribution also helped foster international cooperation.

Implementing entity: The Organisation for the Prohibition of the Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 1 697 000

OJ L 331, 17.12.2005

Duration of the action: 12 months. Implemented.

42.

Council Joint Action 2005/574/CFSP of 18 July 2005 on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — IAEA II.

The objectives of the contribution were to:

(a)

strengthen the physical protection of nuclear materials and other radioactive materials in use, storage and transport and of nuclear facilities;

(b)

strengthen the security of radioactive materials in non-nuclear applications;

(c)

strengthen the countries capabilities for detection and response to illicit trafficking;

(d)

provide legislative assistance for the implementation of obligations under IAEA safeguards agreements and additional protocols.

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Budget: EUR 3 914 000

OJ L 193, 23.7.2005

Duration of the action: 15 months.

Implemented.

43.

Council Joint Action 2004/797/CFSP of 22 November 2004 on support for OPCW activities in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — OPCW I.

The objective was to: support universal adherence to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction (CWC); promote the accession to the CWC by States not Party (signatory States as well as non-signatory States); support the implementation of the CWC by the States Parties and promote international cooperation.

Implementing entity: The Organisation for the Prohibition of the Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Budget: EUR 1 841 000

OJ L 349, 25.11.2004

Estimated duration of the action: 12 months.

Implemented.

44.

Council Joint Action 2004/796/CFSP of 22 November 2004 for the support of the physical protection of a nuclear site in the Russian Federation — Russian Federation III.

The objective was to reinforce the physical protection of nuclear sites in Russia to reduce the risk of theft of nuclear fissile material and of sabotage by improving the physical protection at the Bochvar Institute of the Russian Federal Agency for Atomic Energy (formerly MINATOM).

Implementing entity: The Federal Republic of Germany.

Budget: EUR 7 730 000

OJ L 349, 25.11.2004

Duration of the action: 36 months. Implemented.

45.

Council Joint Action 2004/495/CFSP of 17 May 2004 on support for IAEA activities under its Nuclear security programme and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction — IAEA I.

The objective was to:

(a)

strengthen the physical protection of nuclear materials and other radioactive materials in use, storage and transport and of nuclear facilities;

(b)

strengthen the security of radioactive materials in non-nuclear applications;

(c)

strengthen the countries capabilities for detection and response to illicit trafficking;

Implementing entity: The International Atomic Energy Agency.

Budget: EUR 3 329 000

OJ L 182, 19.5.2004

Duration of the action: 15 months.

Implemented.

46.

Council Joint Action 2003/472/CFSP of 24 June 2003 on the continuation of the European Union cooperation programme for non-proliferation and disarmament in the Russian Federation — Russian Federation II.

The Joint Action financed a unit of experts under the cooperation programme for non-proliferation and disarmament in the Russian Federation.

Implementing entity: The Russian Federation.

Budget: EUR 680 000

OJ L 157, 26.6.2003

Expired on the date of expiry of the EU Common Strategy 1999/414/CFSP on Russia.

Implemented.

47.

Council Joint Action 1999/878/CFSP of 17 December 1999 establishing a European Union Cooperation Programme for Non-proliferation and Disarmament in the Russian Federation — Russian Federation I.

The project contributed to:

(a)

a chemical weapons pilot destruction plant situated in Gorny, Saratov region, Russia;

(b)

set studies and experimental studies on plutonium transport, storage and disposition.

Implementing entity: The Russian Federation.

Budget: EUR 8 900 000

OJ L 331, 23.12.1999

Duration of the action: 48 months.

Implemented.


ANNEX II

OVERVIEW OF INSTRUMENT FOR STABILITY, PRIORITY 1 ‘RISK MITIGATION AND PREPAREDNESS RELATING TO CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL AND NUCLEAR MATERIALS OR AGENTS’

Funding through ISCT-STCU

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

Administrative operating budget, supplemental budgets and projects

Retraining former weapon scientists and engineers through support for:

International Science and Technology Centre (ISTC, Moscow) and

Science and Technology Centre (STCU, Kiev)

To redirect scientists/engineers’ talents to civilian and peaceful activities through science and technological cooperation

ISTC and/or STCU

235 million

Tacis

1997-2006

 

IfS (AAP)

15 million

8 million

7,5  million

5,0  million

4,5  million

4,0  million

4,8  million

4,0  million

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

IfS/2014/348-211

Enhancing regional CBRN detection capacity for the Border Guards in Ukraine and Moldova

To provide mobile chemical and RN detection equipment for the border guards

STCU

4,1  million

9.2014-9.2015

IFS/2015/365-540

Provision of specialized CBRN equipment for first responders in the SEE CoE Region

EU CBRN CoE. CBRN equipment — SEE CoE Region

STCU

1,7  million

2016-6.2017 (tbc)

IFS/2015/369-100

Strengthening the national legal framework and provision of specialized training on bio-safety and bio-security in Central Asia

EU CBRN CoE. Biosafety-biosecurity in Central Asia

ISTC

5 000 000

2016-2018

IFS/2016/378591

Funding of the 2017 ISTC Administrative Operating Budget (AOB), Supplemental Budgets (SBs), and projects

Administrative support — ISTC

ISTC

1 500 000

31.12.2021

IFS/2016/378227

Support to the Centre of Excellence of Eastern and Central Africa in Nuclear Security — ISTC

EU CBRN CoE. Eastern and Central Africa in Nuclear Security.

ISTC

3 500 000

7.11.2019

IFS/2016/378590

Funding of the 2017 STCU Administrative Operating Budget (AOB), Supplemental Budgets (SBs), and projects

Administrative support

STCU

700 000

7.11.2021

Year 2008 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2008/145-156

Combating illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials in FSU countries (Russian Federation, Ukraine, Armenia, Moldova, Georgia, Azerbaijan and Belarus)

To supply equipment for detection of NRM at border check points as it was identified in the previous phase of the activity financed by Tacis Nuclear Safety programme, contributing thus to reduce nuclear and radiation terrorism threat

JRC

5 million

11.7.2008-12.4.2013

IfS/2008/145-130

Assistance in export control of dual-use goods

To support the development of the legal framework and institutional capacities for the establishment and enforcement of effective export controls on dual-use items, including measures for regional cooperation with a view of contributing to the fight against the proliferation of WMD and related materials, equipment and technologies

BAFA (D)

~ 5 million

19.3.2008-31.12.2010

IfS/2008/145-132

Knowledge Management System on CBRN Trafficking

To improve capabilities of participating states, neighbouring countries of the EU in South-East Europe and possibly Caucasus, to combat the illicit trafficking and criminal use of CBRN materials (preparation phase to ‘EU CBRN Centres of Excellence’)

UNICRI

1 million

31.1.2008-1.8.2010

Year 2009 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2009/200-523

Knowledge management system on CBRN trafficking in North Africa and selected countries in the Middle East

To develop a durable cooperation legacy in the area of trafficking of CBRN materials (preparation phase to ‘EU CBRN Centres of Excellence’)

UNICRI

1 million

16.3.2009-15.7.2011

IfS/2009/217-540

Strengthening bio-safety and bio-security capabilities in Central Asian countries

To address shortcomings in the safety/security practices of key biological facilities in selected countries of Central Asia; to raise the skills of the personnel working at facilities (laboratories) handling dangerous biological agents or supervising those facilities, and to provide additional equipment, as needed, to ensure an adequate level of bio-safety and security

ISTC

6,8  million

21.9.2009-21.9.2014

IfS/2009/219-636

Combating illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials in selected FSU and Mediterranean Basin countries and preparation of border management activities in the ASEAN region

To reduce the threat of nuclear and radiation terrorism. For this purpose the assistance will be provided to the partner countries in the improvement of the technical and organisational measures for detection of nuclear and radioactive materials (NRM) illicit trafficking

JRC

6,7  million

2.12.2009-1.12.2014

IfS/2009/216-327

Awareness raising of exporters export control of dual-use goods

To enhance the effectiveness of export control of dual use items in the Russian Federation, with a view to contribute to the fight against the proliferation of WMD (the specific objectives will be achieved through information exchange with EU exporters, support industry and researchers for awareness raising, organisation of seminars for exporters in the regions of the Russian Federation)

Russian independent non-profit organisation for professional advancement ‘Export Control Training Centre’

1 million

1.9.2009-1.3.2011

Year 2010 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2010/239-471 (UNICRI main) — IfS/2010/239-481 (JRC main) — IfS/2010/253-483

and IfS/2010/253-485 (pilot projects JRC and Univ. Milan)/IfS/2010/250-984 (UNICRI establishment of 2 Secretariats)

CBRN Centre of Excellence — First Phase

To set up a mechanism contributing to strengthen the long-term national and regional capabilities of responsible authorities and to develop a durable cooperation legacy in the fight against the CBRN threat

UNICRI/JRC main contracts/2 pilot projects in South East Asia/first step (2 Secretariats in Caucasus and South East Asia)

5 million

5.2010-5.2012

IfS/2010/235-364

Border monitoring activities in the Republic of Georgia, Central Asia and Afghanistan

To enhance the detection of radioactive and nuclear materials at identified borders crossing and/or nodal points in the Republic of Georgia, at Southern borders of selected Central Asian countries with Afghanistan and at the airport of Kabul

JRC

4 million

4.5.2010-4.5.2013

IfS/2010/238-194

EpiSouth: a network for the control of health and security threats and other bio-security risks in the Mediterranean Region and South-East Europe

To increase through capacity building the bio security in the Mediterranean region and South-East Europe (10 EU + 17 non EU countries)

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome (Italy)

3 million

15.10.2010-15.4.2013

IfS/2010/247-264 (service)

IfS/2010/248-064 + IfS/2010/258-635 (supply)

Redirection of former Iraqi WMD scientists through capacity building for decommissioning of nuclear facilities, including site and radioactive waste management

To assist Iraq with redirection of scientists and engineers possessing WMD-related skills and dual-use knowledge through their engagement in a comprehensive decommissioning, dismantling and decontamination of nuclear facilities

Università degli Studi dell’Insubria (service) —

CANBERRA + NNL (supplies)

2,5  million

(1,5 mil. for service + 1,5 mil. for supplies)

8.2010-8.2013

IfS/2010/253-484

Knowledge Management System on CBRN risk mitigation — Evolving towards CoE ‘Mediterranean Basin’

To integrate the existing Knowledge Management Systems, namely for South East Europe and for North Africa, and to prepare the evolution towards a Centre of Excellence in the Mediterranean Basin dealing with CBRN risk mitigation (preparation phase to ‘EU CBRN Centres of Excellence’)

UNICRI

0,5  million

25.11.2010-30.4.2012

IfS/2010/254-942

Bio-safety and bio-security improvement at the Ukrainian anti-plague station (UAPS) in Simferopol

To contribute to full implementation of the BTWC (Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention) in Ukraine, which includes the prevention of illicit access to pathogens by terrorists and other criminals

STCU

4 million

22.11.2010-21.8.2014

IfS/2010/256-885

Assistance in export control of dual-use goods

To continue the on-going activities in this field in the already covered countries, with possible extension to other regions/countries

BAFA (D)

5 million

21.12.2010-1.7.2013

Year 2011 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount

(EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2011/263-555 (set-up)

IfS/2011/273-506

(actions)

CBRN Centres of Excellence — Second phase

To set-up three to four new Centres in the Middle East and, possibly, Gulf region, Mediterranean Basin, Central Asia and Southern Africa, extend the projects in South East Asia and in Ukraine/South Caucasus and implement thematic projects in all project areas of priority 1

UNICRI

4,5  million

16,3  million

23.8.2011-28.2.2013

IfS/2011/273-571

Enhancing the capability of the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Service (ECAS) — EU contribution to the new Nuclear Material Laboratory (NML)

To ensure that the IAEA has a strong independent analytical capability for safeguards in the decades to come by means of expansion and modernisation of the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Services

IAEA

5 million

30.11.2011-30.11.2015

IfS/2011/272-372 (service) and IfS/2011/272-424 (supplies)

Establishment of Mobile Laboratories for Pathogens up to Risk Group 4 in combination with CBRN Capacity Building in Sub-Saharan Africa

To implement two units of mobile labs to be used to perform diagnosis of up to group 4 infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa and one ‘stand-by’ unit based in the EU for training purposes and to be deployed in other countries outside the EU where these agents are endemic or outbreaks occur

Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für Tropenmedizin (service) — supply under evaluation

3,5  million

15.12.2011-14.12.2015

IfS/2011/273-572

Strengthening bio-safety and bio-security capabilities in South Caucasus and in Central Asian Countries

To raise the capabilities of State organisations in target countries responsible for bio-safety and bio-security in a way that will result in a substantial improvement of the countries’ bio-safety/security situations

UNICRI

5 million

1.1.2012-31.12.2015

IfS/2011/278-349

Multilateral Nuclear Assurances — EU contribution to the Low Enriched Uranium bank under the supervision of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

To purchase a quantity of Low Enriched Uranium

IAEA

20 million

30.11.2011-30.11.2013

Year 2012 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2012/285-261

CBRN protection to Ukraine in the framework of the UEFA European Football Championship 2012

To counteract nuclear and radiation terrorism threat (for these purposes the assistance should be provided to Ukraine in the improvement of the technical and organisational measures for detection of Nuclear and Radioactive Materials (NRM) illicit trafficking, including training and establishment of an expert network)

Sateilyturvakeskus

343 000

3.2012-4.2013

IfS/2012/292-244

Supply for POL11 — Equipment Supply for CBRN protection support to Ukraine in the framework of the UEFA European Championship 2012

To enhance the CBRN security at Poland-Ukraine border with the occasion of the football championship Euro2012

Sateilyturvakeskus

307 000

5.2012-1.2014

IfS/2012/301-327

Provision of specialised technical training to enhance the first responders’ capabilities in case of CBRN incidents

To reinforce inter-agency coordination to respond to CBRN incidents (this includes defining standard operational procedures in response to such incidents, e.g. post-incident management and site restoration)

France Expertise Internationale

699 274

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/301-675

EU CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence Initiative

To provide support in the implementation of the project ‘EU CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence’

JRC

3,5  million

10.2012-10.2014

IfS/2012/301-740

Building capacity to identify and respond to threats from chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear substances

The European Commission is seeking external support to implement technical aspects related to the EU CBRN Risk Mitigation CoE. The overall objective of the project of which this contract will be a part is as follows: 1) Counter the threat arising from chemical, biological and radioactive or nuclear agents in particular when used in a criminal or terrorist context; 2) Improve the preparedness and response capabilities of states to unlawful or criminal acts involving CBRN agents.

Fundacion Internacional y para Iberoamerica de Administracion y Politicas Publicas

499 100

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/301-756

Contribution to the establishment and development of EU Centres of Excellence Governance — Phase II

The main aim of this assignment is to link actively technical expertise, management initiative, elements of diplomacy and of cultural sensitiveness to enhance the establishment and performance of the CoE initiative. By implementing modern and judicious governance approaches, it will in particular support capacity building and management with the right sense of ownership among actors and stakeholders at national, regional and overall levels, and correctly adapt the initiative to the challenges of CBRN risk mitigation. The initiative also aims at enhancing the visibility, acceptance and support among the EU stakeholders, both at EU and MS levels.

Association Groupe ESSEC

1 399 988

12.2012-6.2014

IfS/2012/302-214

Regional Human Resource Development for Nuclear Safety, Security and Safeguards Management through a University Master’s Programme carried out in Thailand

To cover the tuition fees and living expenses of 10 Thai and 10 international (limited to the Southeast Asia region) students expected to enrol and graduate from the Master’s degree programme developed jointly with the US PNNL in Nuclear Safety, Security and Safeguards Management at the Chulalongkorn University of Thailand

Enconet Consulting GMBH

649 812

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/302-252

Bio-risk Management

To share the bio-risk management program developed in Thailand with the participating countries in the project

France Expertise Internationale

480 000

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/302-364

Development of a methodology for RN materials detection, management and protection of the public

To develop and manage a system for the detection of RN material from sensors located in a variety of locations such as borders, critical infrastructure, ports, airports, etc.; to recommend equipment and standard procedures to respond to RN events

France Expertise Internationale

599 830

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/302-427

Prerequisite to strengthening CBRN national legal frameworks

To increase, through capacity building the health security in the Mediterranean Area and South-East Europe Black Sea Region by enhancing and strengthening the preparedness to common health threats and bio-security risks at national and regional levels by the creation of a Network of laboratories, by strengthening the already previously created by Episouth plus (the reinforcement of relations of trust in a region is an objective and an instrument in the scope of Project’s implementation)

France Expertise Internationale

299 936

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/302-428

Knowledge development and transfer of best practice on bio-safety/bio-security/bio-risk management

To develop and transfer knowledge concerning best practice on bio-safety, bio-security and bio-risk management in this region

Università degli Studi di Roma Torvergata

434 010

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/304-799

Assistance in export control of dual-use goods

To strengthen the export control systems of partner countries, with a strong link with the Regional Centres of Excellence activities, by aligning them to the standard of the international export control regimes and treaties and therefore meeting the requirements of the UNSCR 1540 (2004)

Bundesrepublik Deutschland

3 650 000

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/305-778

‘EU CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence’ Coordination and CBRN Need Assessment Methodology

To support countries with improving national policies and ensuring international cooperation in the area of CBRN risk mitigation through the implementation of a Needs Assessment methodology for the Regional Secretariats and the partner countries

United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute

2 million

12.2012-6.2015

IfS/2012/306-644

Supply of radiation detection equipment for South East Asia — LOT 1

To supply radiation detecting equipment to the various entities (border guards, custom services) from Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and the Philippines

Polimaster Instruments UAB

497 500

12.2012-3.2014

IfS/2012/306-670

Supply of radiation detection equipment for South East Asia — LOT2

To supply radiation detecting equipment to the various entities (border guards, custom services) from Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and the Philippines

Mirion Technologies MGPI SA

241 540

12.2012-3.2014

IfS/2012/306-675

Supply of radiation detection equipment for South East Asia — LOT 3

To supply radiation detecting equipment to the various entities (border guards, custom services) from Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and the Philippines

ENVINET AS

988 205

12.2012-10.2015

IfS/2012/307-293

Establishment of a Mediterranean Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (MediPIET)

To enhance health security in the Mediterranean region by supporting capacity building for prevention and control of natural or man-made threats to health posed by communicable diseases through the start-up of a long-term Mediterranean Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (MediPIET)

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control

440 000

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/307-400

Supply of radiation detection equipment for Democratic Republic of Congo — LOT1

To supply radiation detecting equipment to the Custom and Excise Administration Directorate of the Democratic Republic of Congo

Polimaster Instruments UAB

298 500

12.2012-3.2014

IfS/2012/307-401

Supply of radiation detection equipment for Democratic Republic of Congo — LOT2

To supply radiation detecting equipment to the Custom and Excise Administration Directorate of the Democratic Republic of Congo

Mirion Technologies MGPI SA

121 660

12.2012-3.2014

IfS/2012/307-781

Support for the border monitoring activities in the South East Asia and Democratic Republic of the Congo

To counteract nuclear and radiation terrorism threat (for this purposes, the assistance should be provided to the identified countries in the improvement of the technical and organisational measures for detection of Nuclear and Radioactive Materials (NRM) illicit trafficking, including training and establishment of an expert network)

JRC

1 650 000

12.2012-12.2015

IfS/2012/308-512

Implementation of Projects CBRN — 3rd call: #77 #111 #114

The overall objective is the enhancement of the RN security situation in the countries of concern (with a spin-off towards chemical detection under P77). Such concern needs to be addressed in a systematic manner and with interventions at quite a few different levels. Also the ‘action radius’ of the interventions needs to be described (to assure the proper engagement of the key actors).

JRC

2,3  million

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/310-879

Network of universities and institutes for raising awareness on dual-use concerns of chemical materials

The European Commission is seeking external support to implement technical aspects related to the EU CBRN Risk Mitigation CoE. The overall objective of the project is to reinforce inter-interagency coordination to respond to CBRN incidents. This includes defining standard operational procedures in response to such incidents, e.g. post-incident management and site restoration.

Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l’Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile — ENEA

721 886

12.2012-12.2014

IfS/2012/301-675

EU CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence Initiative

To provide support for the implementation of the project ‘EU CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence’

JRC

3,5  million

10.2012-10.2014

IfS/2012/306-680

Second contribution to enhance the capability of the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Service (ECAS) — The New Nuclear Material Laboratory (NML)

To support IAEA in constructing and outfitting the chemistry and instrumentation laboratories of the new IAEA Safeguards Analytical Services NML for the analysis of nuclear material according to the latest standards assuring safety and measurement quality

IAEA

5 million

12.2012-12.2016

Year 2013 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2013/315-979

Strengthening the National CBRN Legal Framework & Provision of specialized and technical training to enhance CBRN preparedness and response capabilities

The present procedure aims at awarding a Contract that will technically implement two projects (Component 1 and Component 2) funded by the EU Instrument for Stability (Priority 1) in the framework of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear — Centres of Excellence (CBRN-CoE)

France Expertise Internationale

2 699 069

9.2013-9.2016

IfS/2013/316-496

Strengthening Capacities in CBRN Response and in Chemical and Medical Emergency

The CBRN emergency response needs to be identified and prioritised per country. Comprehensive technology solutions for detection, protection, decontamination, mitigation, containment and disposal should also be elaborated. CBRN incidents require full utilization of national resources to respond to and mitigate the consequences of such emergencies. The main responsibility in cases of CBRN emergencies falls upon first responders. It is therefore essential that countries build upon their national resources to mitigate and respond to the consequences of an emergency situation. Best-practices should thus be exchanged amongst these first responders at MIE regional level and CBRN risk mitigation knowledge developed. It should also result in increased awareness of stocks of hazardous chemical agents, their pre-cursors as this is one of the means of targeting illicit use and/or trafficking of WMD.

Wojskowy Instytut Higieny i Epidemiologii

3 914 034

12.2013-12.2016

IfS/2013/318-905

Support to the European Commission — Exploratory missions in Middle East/East and south Mediterranean countries/South East of Europe in the safety and security CBRN fields

To provide support to the European Commission with finding out what kind of short-term measures should be developed taken into account different situations and circumstances regionally and/or nationally (this entails assessing countries’ preparedness — risk assessment, crisis prevention and warning systems — and response mechanisms in the field of CBRN)

France Expertise Internationale

299 999

6.2013-6.2015

IfS/2013/321-215

Strengthening Health Security at Ports, Airports and Ground crossings

To increase health security globally by providing technical guidance and tools, information and knowledge sharing, international collaboration and assisting countries in enhancing and strengthening capacities for prevention, detection, control and response to public health events related to activities at points of entry and international travel and transport, in a multi-sectoral approach, to minimize risks in association with natural or deliberate released hazards

World Health Organisation

1,5  million

7.2013-7.2015

IfS/2013/323-494

AAF — Waste management

EU CBRN CoE. To improve the management of biologic and chemical waste in the African Atlantic Façade region and Tunisia. This includes the review of regulations and technical training on detection and sampling

Fundacion Internacional y para Iberoamerica de Administracion y Politicas Publicas

3 871 800

1.2014-6.2017

IfS/2013/329-422

Implementation of Projects CBRN — 3rd call. Complementary actions for project: #77 #111 #114

EU CBRN CoE. The global overall scope of work is to pursue international efforts in counteracting the threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism. This project aims at supporting the development of an integrated regional nuclear safety and security systems. This will be achieved by assessing the adoption of laws and regulation in the field in order comply with international related standards for improving the security and safety of radioactive sources by encouraging the establishment of storage facilities and completion of inventories, disseminate best practices for the development of a national response plan in the participating countries. These activities are carried out under a well-coordinated approach with other donors in the region, in order not to duplicate existing efforts.

IAEA

700 047

1.2014-12.2015

IfS/2013/332-096

Export control outreach for dual use items

This project aims to deepen support measures to improve dual use export control systems in third countries taking specific geopolitical challenges into account. The following beneficiary countries are eligible under this project: Jordan/Neighbouring Countries and Kazakhstan/Neighbouring Countries. Regional activities may include all beneficiary countries in the region. Where appropriate and in justified cases and following the demand of beneficiary countries also activities in other countries/or regions will be carried out.

Bundesamt für Wirtschaft und Ausfuhrkontrolle

2,5  million

12.2013-12.2015

IfS/2013/332-212

Conferences associated to EU CBRN Centres of Excellence

To provide support for organising conferences and meetings in partner countries in order to enhance the inter-agency cooperation that will contribute to mitigating the risks and threats associated with Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) materials and facilities

LDK Consultants, Engineers & Planners SA

140 885,85

1.2014-1.2015

IfS/2013/332-306

Consolidation and Extension of the CBRN Regional Centre Secretariats

EU CBRN CoE. To strengthen regional capabilities in the area of CBRN risk mitigation. It is expected that the project will promote better cooperation and coordination of countries on CBRN risk mitigation at regional and international levels (the set-up of the Regional Secretariats is meant to provide the missing infrastructure at regional level to facilitate sharing of information and experience among partner countries)

United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute

3,1  million

5.2014-10.2015

IfS/2013/332-312

Strengthening Health Laboratories to minimize potential biological risks

To minimize potential biological risks through enhancement of laboratory biosafety, biosecurity, quality management and diagnostic capacity. Specific objective 1: Support the development of nationally-owned laboratory policies, strategies norms and regulations Specific objective 2: Engage institutional and individual capacity building efforts through implementation of appropriate tools, methodologies and training activities Specific objective 3: Enhance the ability of Member States to safely and rapidly detect and respond to natural or deliberate events of national and international concern according to the IHR through support to laboratory networks

World Health Organisation

4 495 712

12.2013-12.2016

IfS/2013/329-859

Further development and consolidation of the Mediterranean Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (‘MediPIET’)

To contribute to the overall objective of enhancing health security in the Mediterranean region by supporting capacity building for prevention and control of natural or man-made health threats posed by communicable diseases through the further roll-out of the Mediterranean Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (MediPIET)

Fundacion Internacional y para Iberoamerica de Administracion y Politicas Publicas

6,4  million

12.2013-12.2016

IfS/2013/330-961

MEDILABSECURE

To increase, through capacity building the health security in the Mediterranean Area and South-East Europe Black Sea Region by enhancing and strengthening the preparedness to common health threats and bio-security risks at national and regional levels by the creation of a Network of laboratories, by strengthening the already previously created by Episouth plus (the reinforcement of relations of trust in a region is an objective and an instrument in the scope of Project’s implementation)

Institut Pasteur

Fondation

3 626 410

12.2013-12.2017

Year 2014 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IfS/2014/337-084

Elimination of Syrian Chemical Weapons of Mass destruction

To contribute to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) Special Trust Fund that finances the activities for the complete destruction of Syrian Chemical material stockpiles

OPCW

12 million

2.2014-12.2015

IfS/2014/343-652

Contribution to the establishment and development of EU Centres of Excellence Governance — Phase III

To support to the governance of the EU CBRN Centres of Excellence

ESSEC-IRENE-ENCO

1,5  million

9.2014-9.2016

IfS/2014/346-176

High risk chemical facilities and risk mitigation in the AAF Region

EU CBRN CoE. Enhancing sound chemical hazard management within the African Atlantic Façade Region in order to prevent the occurrence of high risks chemical accidents

France Expertise Internationale

3 million

1.2015-12.2017

IFS/2014/346-488

Chemical safety and security in the Central and Eastern African region

EU CBRN CoE. Enhancing sound chemical hazard management within the ECA region by strengthening the national ‘Chemical legal framework’ in order to prevent the occurrence of accident inside and around all important chemical installations, as well as to enhance Chemical preparedness and response capabilities

Gesellschaft für Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) MBH

2 978 000

1.2015-1.2018

IfS/2014/347-013

EUWAM-Lab (P43)

EU CBRN CoE. Establishment of a Mobile Laboratory for in situ interventions on VHF outbreak sites in combination with CBRN Capacity Building in Western Africa

France Expertise Internationale

2 579 854,40

9.2014-9.2016

IfS/2014/347-135

EU outreach programme for dual use items

Contribute to the creation, consolidation or updating the effective export control systems for dual use items in partner countries by continuing to offer them a long-term perspective for cooperation

France Expertise Internationale

2 249 250

9.2015-2.2017

IfS/2014/347-634

Strengthening CBRN first response capabilities and regional cooperation in South East Europe, Southern Caucasus, Moldova and Ukraine

EU CBRN CoE. Enhance response capabilities and promote inter-agency and regional cooperation in CBRN first response in the South East Europe, Southern Caucasus, Moldova and Ukraine

Centre d’Etude de l’Energie Nucléaire Fondation d’Utilité Publique

2 953 550

1.2015-12.2017

IfS/2014/350-752

One Health Project in Pakistan

Support the development of a structured, integrated and sustainable collaboration between the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Agriculture in Pakistan for improved risk assessments and detection, prevention and control of the spread of emerging zoonotic diseases

World Health Organization

927 608

1.2015-1.2017

Year 2015 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IFS/2015/355-376

EU outreach programme for dual use items — South-East Asia

Support to export control outreach in South-East Asia.

France Expertise Internationale

2 999 500

9.2015-2.2017

IFS/2011/272-372

Establishment of Mobile Laboratories for Pathogens up to Risk Group 4 in combination with CBRN Capacity Building in sub-Saharan Africa

EU CBRN CoE — Mobile labs in sub-Saharan Africa — Extension

BERNHARD-NOCHT-INSTITUT FUR TROPENMEDIZIN

500 000

6.2016

IFS/2015/355-443

Enhancement of CBRN capacities of South East Asia in addressing CBRN risk mitigation concerning CBRN first response, biosafety and biosecurity, awareness raising and legal framework

EU CBRN CoE Biosafety-biosecurity in South East Asia

FUNDACION INTERNACIONAL Y PARA IBEROAMERICA DE ADMINISTRACION Y POLITICAS PUBLICAS

3 000 000,00

7.2015-7.2018

IFS/2015/355-879

Provision of specialized CBRN equipment for training first responders

EU CBRN CoE CBRN equipment for first responders in Gabon, Mauritania, Morocco, Senegal, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya and Uganda

PAUL BOYE TECHNOLOGIES SAS — FR

2 712 516,87

9.2015-9.2017

IFS/2015/357-652

ON-SITE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO THE CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL AND NUCLEAR CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE SECRETARIATS

EU CBRN CoE On site technical assistance (Rabat, Tbilisi, Nairobi)

AGRICONSULTING EUROPE SA — BE

2 969 700,00

9.2015-9.2018

IFS/2015/362-277

REGIONAL MANAGEMENT OF OUTBREAKS IN THE CBRN CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE PARTNER COUNTRIES OF THE AFRICAN ATLANTIC FAÇADE REGION

EU CBRN CoE Management of outbreaks in the African Atlantic Façade (pandemics)

AGENCE FRANCAISE D EXPERTISE TECHNIQUE INTERNATIONALE

3 499 600,00

1.2016-12.2018

IFS/2015/370291

Feasibility study for the establishment of the Wildlife Forensics Training Academy in South Africa

Wildlife Forensics Training

NEDERLANDS FORENSISCH INSTITUUT

182 000

28.12.2016

IFS/2015359484

Strengthening the CBRN Centre of Excellence Regional Secretariat for the Gulf Cooperation Council Region

Support to GCC region

CENTRE D’ETUDE DE L’ENERGIE NUCLEAIRE FONDATION D’UTILITE PUBLIQUE

285 000

14.9.2016

IFS/2015355376

EU outreach programme for dual use items — South-East Asia

EU outreach programme for dual use items in South-East Asia

AGENCE FRANCAISE D’EXPERTISE TECHNIQUE INTERNATIONALE

2 999 500

28.2.2017

IFS/2015371715

Capacity building for medical preparedness and response to CBRN incidents — CoE Project 54

EU CBRN CoE CBRN. Capacity building for medical preparedness and response to CBRN incidents. Middle East (P54)

SUSTAINABLE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SOLUTIONS COMMUNITY INTEREST COMPANY

2 999 965

17.7.2019

IFS/2015365817

Annual meeting EU CBRN National Focal Points 2016

 

LDK CONSULTANTS ENGINEERS & PLANNERS SA

182 949,5

11.10.2016

Year 2016 (excluding funding for ISTC/STCU)

Project identification

Title

Objective

Contractor

Amount (EUR)

Execution period

IFS/2016/373918

Strengthening cross-border capacity for control and detection of CBRN substances

EU CBRN CoE CBRN cross border security in the North of Africa and Sahel (P55)

AGENCE FRANCAISE D’EXPERTISE TECHNIQUE INTERNATIONALE

3 500 000

30.9.2019

IFS/2016/372955

ON-SITE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO THE CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL AND NUCLEAR CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE SECRETARIATS in Algiers and Tashkent

EU CBRN CoE On site technical assistance (Algiers, Amman, Tashkent)

ENCONET CONSULTING GMBH

2 130 250

10.11.2019

IFS/2016/369616

Support to the development, adoption and implementation of CBRN Needs Assessments, National and Regional CBRN Action Plans, their promotion and visibility

EU CBRN CoE. Promotion, adoption, implementation and visibility of CBRN Needs Assessments, National and Regional CBRN Action Plans

UNITED NATIONS INTERREGIONAL CRIME AND JUSTICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

2 000 000

31.8.2017

IFS/2016/378224

P58 — Provision of specialized equipment for CBRN forensics in the SEEE CoE Region

EU CBRN CoE. Forensics equipment.

In preparation

1 871 115

Mid-2018

IFS/2016/376203

Study on the sustainability of the EU CBRN CoE’s capacity building activities

EU CBRN CoE. Educational component.

FONDAZIONE ALESSANDRO VOLTA PER LAPROMOZIONE DELL UNIVERSITA DELLA RICERCA SCIENTIFICA DELL ALTA FORMAZIONE E DELLA CULTURA

298 900

31.3.2018

IFS/2016/377943

Strengthening the CBRN Centre of Excellence Regional Secretariat for the Gulf Cooperation Council Region

EU CBRN CoE. On site technical assistance (GCC region)

Senior expert

425 000

2.2019

IFS/2016/374993

P57 ‘Strengthening crime scene forensics capabilities in investigating CBRN incidents in the South East and Eastern Europe Centres of Excellence region’

EU CBRN CoE. ‘Strengthening crime scene forensics capabilities’

CENTRE D’ETUDE DE L’ENERGIE NUCLEAIRE FONDATION D’UTILITE PUBLIQUE

1 399 670

14.1.2020

IFS/2016/381687

Worldwide technical support to the EU CBRN Centres of Excellence.

EU CBRN CoE. Portal, NAQs, NAPs, technical evaluations, communication.

EC DG JRC

3 500 000

Mid-2018

IFS/2016/378793

Supporting the EC organizing European Summer School 2017 and Conference in Export Control

European Summer School 2017 and Conference in Export Control

LDK CONSULTANTS ENGINEERS & PLANNERS SA

277 167,75

8.3.2018

IFS/2016/378848

Assistance on evaluation of Export Control Outreach P2P program

Evaluation of P2P programme

ESPONA

20 000

17.2.2017

IFS/2016/377918

Support to the EU CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence initiative and its mechanisms. Towards the consolidation of the regional secretariats.

EU CBRN CoE

UNITED NATIONS INTERREGIONAL CRIME AND JUSTICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

3 000 000

14.1.2018

IFS/2016/378686

EU CBRN Centres of Excellence NFP meeting 2017

EU CBRN CoE annual international meeting.

ITALTREND C&T SPA

235 587

6.4.2017


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