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Document 52014DC0527

COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL AND THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE on the EU Strategy and Action Plan for customs risk management: Tackling risks, strengthening supply chain security and facilitating trade

/* COM/2014/0527 final */

52014DC0527

COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL AND THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE on the EU Strategy and Action Plan for customs risk management: Tackling risks, strengthening supply chain security and facilitating trade /* COM/2014/0527 final */


COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL AND THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE

on the EU Strategy and Action Plan for customs risk management:

Tackling risks, strengthening supply chain security and facilitating trade

1. Introduction

Smooth and safe trade flows are of critical importance to the economic growth and competitiveness of the European Union (EU) which is also the world's largest trading block. Effective management of risks in the international supply chain is crucial to ensuring the security and safety of EU residents, the protection of the financial and economic interests of the EU, while at the same time facilitating legitimate trade. The EU single market and customs union requires, for their proper functioning, customs to tackle risks consistently. In order to strengthen the integrity of international supply chains, risk management by EU customs must be improved.   

After full implementation of the Security Amendment[1] of the Community Customs Code[2] in 2011, the Commission published, in January 2013, an analysis of the implementation of customs risk management policy. The Communication[3] identified gaps in the current approach and proposed a way forward. In June 2013, the Council[4] invited the Commission to bring forward, in cooperation with the Member States, ‘a coherent strategy on risk management and supply chain security based on a step by step action plan and thorough cost benefit analyses, covering inter alia legal, procedural and IT aspects’.

This Communication puts forward a strategy for improving customs risk management and supply chain security ('the Strategy') and a table of priority actions ('the Action Plan')[5] in the annex attached.

2. Scope of the Strategy

The Strategy embodies a number of key objectives, underpinned by the overall aim of reaching a high-quality, multi-layered approach to risk management which is effective and efficient. It outlines appropriate risk mitigation and control measures, to be employed at the most opportune time and place in the supply chain. It takes account of the variable nature and broad range of risks to be addressed, and the primary responsibility of customs authorities in the supervision of the EU's international trade in goods. The Strategy takes account of the role of other competent authorities involved in supply chain movements, and underlines the need for complementarity. It also refers to the international context of risks and the importance of international cooperation in risk management. The Strategy also takes account of the importance for the EU of facilitating and accelerating trade, the central role of economic operators, and the necessity to avoid undue disruption of logistics and supply chain processes.

3. An Action Plan to improve risk management 

The Action Plan details a series of measures for each objective. The actions are aimed at closing the identified gaps to achieve strengthened capacities for EU customs authorities progressively and more systematic cooperation with other agencies, economic operators and international trading partners. The Action Plan includes activities to support or develop international norms and standards where appropriate.

The most fundamental underlying challenge concerns the need for high quality data on supply chain movements and its proper availability and exploitation for risk management purposes by customs and other competent authorities. Ensuring that the appropriate capacities and methodologies are developed and implemented to enable and facilitate collaboration among authorities will be a key element of future progress.

4. Coherence and complementarity with other EU initiatives

When implementing the Strategy and Action Plan, the Commission will pursue complementarity and coherence with ongoing, related initiatives, both in customs (e.g. Union Customs Code[6], mutual administrative assistance[7]) and in other policy areas. Account will be taken of security initiatives notably in the area of internal security[8], air cargo security[9], maritime security (including e-Maritime and CISE)[10] and the review of export control policy[11]. Other relevant transport policy initiatives will also be considered, including the  reporting formalities directive[12] setting up national single windows for reporting and sharing ship-related information and linking it with other national electronic systems, SafeSeaNet data exchange system[13] allowing information exchange between Member States, and e-Freight as part of 2011 Transport White Paper[14] aiming at making logistics more efficient and less costly through simplifying the access and use of information in logistics.

Relevant policy initiatives for product[15], animal, food and feed safety, protection of the environment, in particular FLEGT[16] and CITES[17] will also be taken into account as well as related initiatives in the area of intellectual property rights (IPR) such as the EU Customs Action Plan to combat IPR infringements[18], the IPR Enforcement Action plan, which foresees the development of an EU due-diligence scheme as a means to prevent commercial scale IPR infringements[19], and the Strategy for the Protection and Enforcement of IPRs in third countries, which targets improved international cooperation[20].

5. A Cost-Benefit Analysis to support the approach

The Commission has commissioned a study to identify and review costs and benefits of alternative approaches to support the implementation of the Strategy. Its primary focus was on the potential solutions for improving data quality, availability and use for risk management purposes relating to goods entering the EU. The options assessed were: (1) a fully decentralised approach with all developments carried out at Member State level and peer-to-peer communication; (2) a shared services approach with the creation of a common repository to support data availability to Member States and a related platform to integrate and streamline the communication workflow between Member States; and (3) a shared services approach with the addition of a common external interface for the submission of data by trade independent of the Member State competent to receive the data.

The study concluded that the creation of a common repository to enable appropriate and timely sharing of information would make an essential contribution to ensure effective customs risk management in the EU. The common external interface for traders would provide additional benefits through the reduction of cost to traders.

The Commission will consider carefully the available options and practical implementation issues including organisational and funding implications. This work will be carried out as a priority.

6.   Conclusions

The Commission will take the necessary initiatives to implement this Strategy and Action Plan, notably in the context of the Union Customs Code and associated IT developments, and will adopt a consistent approach with other EU initiatives in the domain of data collection. The Commission draws the attention of the Council and the Parliament to the importance of the implementation of this strategy and action plan. It calls on Member States and other stakeholders to contribute to an effective and efficient implementation.

[1] Council Regulation (EC) 648/05

[2] Council Regulation (EEC) 2913/92

[3] COM (2012) 793 final, 8.1.2013

[4] Council Conclusions 8761/3/13, 18 June 2013

[5] These were developed together with Member States experts.

[6] Council Regulation (EU) 952/13, 9.10.2013

[7] Draft proposed amendment of Council Regulation (EC) 515/97

[8] COM(2010) 673 final, 22.11.2010 and  its follow-up

[9] Council Conclusions 17563/10, 7.12.2010

[10] JOIN(2014) 9 final, 6.3.2014, and  EU Maritime Security Strategy, adopted by the Council 10915/14, 24.6.2014

[11] COM(2014) 244 final, 24.4.2014

[12] Directive 2010/65/EU

[13] Directive 2002/59/EC

[14] COM(2011) 144 final, 28.3.2011

[15] COM(2013) 76 final, 13.2.2013

[16] Council Regulation (EC) No 2173/2005, 20.12.2005

[17] Council Regulation (EC) No 338/97, 9.12.1996

[18] Council Resolution 2013/C 80/01, 19.3.2013

[19] COM(2014) 392 final, 1.7.2014

[20] COM(2014) 389 final, 1.7.2014

EU Strategy for customs risk management:

Tackling risks, strengthening supply chain security and facilitating trade

In their supervision of the supply chain and of the movement of goods crossing EU borders European customs authorities must put in place measures to:  secure the integrity of the supply chain for international goods movements and protect the security and safety of the Union and its residents; protect the financial and economic interests of the EU and its Member States; facilitate and accelerate legitimate trade and promote EU competitiveness. Working with other competent authorities, business, and international partners is crucial.

Faced with the growing volume of trade movements and the need to supervise the supply chain customs uses risk management to implement effective and efficient controls, avoid unwarranted disruption to legitimate business and deploy resources efficiently. Control resources and interventions can thus prioritise areas posing the highest and most serious risks with necessary controls carried out at the most appropriate time and place.

The EU single market and customs union, together with the transnational dimension of threats, underscores the mutual reliance of Member States and the need to tackle risks effectively with the necessary consistency and uniformity across the EU.

The EU common framework for customs risk management is firmly established, yet it needs to continue to adapt and develop in order to become more coherent, effective and cost-efficient in its supervision of supply chain risk. It is the responsibility of the Commission and Member States to ensure this.

I. Underlying principles of EU customs risk management of the supply chain

This Strategy relates to the risk management and control of goods entering into, taken out of or transiting through the Union with due regard to their specific characteristics, the scale of risk and the costs for both customs and trade.

Risk management of the movement of goods through the international supply chain requires the capacity to identify, evaluate and analyse the full range of threats and risks associated with goods and their movements. It must take account of the diversity of risks, at EU and national level, and their impact and consequences should those risks materialise to undertake risk mitigation and control measures at the most opportune time and place in the supply chain.

1) 'Assess in advance, control where required'

The EU common framework for customs risk management must provide for the risk assessment of cargo in advance of its loading in a third country, arrival on EU territory or arrival at its final (customs) destination to allow deployment of counter-measures appropriate to identified risk – in essence 'Assess in advance, control where required'.

The aim is to manage risks in an optimal way, for example: the security risk of an explosive device or threat posed by a highly infectious disease needs to be addressed prior to loading; prohibited, smuggled or dangerous goods need early intervention, but can be controlled upon arrival on EU territory or at the place of unloading; some risks such as product safety can be dealt with at the time of clearance; financial, commercial policy and other risks can be addressed at the time of clearance, as well as post-clearance through audit controls. Authorised Economic Operator programmes and trusted trader concepts are of particular importance in facilitating and accelerating the movement and customs clearance of trade between identifiably secure traders posing a lower risk.

2.) Multiagency cooperation 

The EU customs authorities as the authorities primarily responsible for the supervision of the Union’s international trade recognise that effective risk management is a multi-agency concern. It requires close cooperation among customs authorities internationally, between customs and other governmental authorities including law enforcement and security agencies, and economic operators.

3.) Multi-layered and coordinated approach

Mindful of these needs and challenges, the EU and its Member States must ensure and rely upon a robust system for the early risk assessment of movements of goods. This requires a multi-layered and co-ordinated approach with input from all competent authorities and the timely submission to customs by supply chain actors of appropriate and harmonised data.

4.) Efficient use of resources

The EU and its Member States must provide for the collection, integration and management of electronic information from multiple sources taking advantage of existing IT capabilities and of new opportunities for efficiency gains.

Appropriate sharing of this data and of risk-relevant information and control results among EU customs authorities is crucial. Through the common framework the EU and its Member States must ensure this information can be made available and exploited fully for risk management purposes while complying with the data protection provisions in force.

For the consistent treatment of risks the EU customs authorities must ensure that the full range of available capacities, including equipment, is appropriately deployed, and ensure ongoing evaluation to avoid redundancy and un-necessary controls and costs.

II. Enhancing multi-layered customs risk management in the EU

To improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the EU-wide risk management framework the Commission and the Member States will cooperate, step by step, to take the measures necessary For the objectives and By the means mentioned hereunder:

1) Improve data quality and filing arrangements

For the timely submission to customs authorities of high-quality and comprehensive data regarding international supply chain movements of goods crossing EU borders;

By adjusting the EU legal, procedural and IT systems to ensure that operators with a role in the commercial supply chain can submit required information, including advance cargo information, in a harmonised way, taking into account international standards, without undue costs for business models or for customs authorities.

2) Ensure availability of supply chain data and sharing of risk relevant information among customs authorities

For allowing Member State customs authorities to analyse and mitigate risks where they are relevant and ensure equivalent treatment of economic operators;

By putting in place appropriate legal, procedural and IT mechanisms to support the necessary data availability, communication and risk-relevant information-sharing, including control results, among EU customs authorities through the entire customs control process.

3) Implement control and risk mitigation measures where required

For ensuring that risk mitigation and control measures are consistently employed to respond appropriately to identified EU and national risks while maximising efficiency in the use of resources and fluidity of the supply chain;

By putting in place methodologies and procedures to allow that risk-based controls are carried out at the most appropriate time and place in the supply chain, results are shared between customs authorities, and unnecessary or duplicate controls are avoided;

BY identifying where and at which point in time controls and risk mitigation measures are required to optimally address the risk and take account of constraints of the logistic chain.

4) Strengthen capacities

For securing equivalence in effective implementation of the EU common customs risk management framework across all Member States and increasing responsiveness to newly identified risks;

By identifying and addressing inappropriate variances in implementation at Member State level including, where appropriate, through EU level support to address identified weaknesses;

By continuing to analyse and identify possible further capacities at EU and Member State level that might be necessary to support more effective and efficient risk management;

By enhancing further co-operation and co-ordination among EU customs authorities;

By developing further and continually evaluating EU common risk criteria and standards for the full range of risks and ensuring their harmonised implementation;

By systematic monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of EU risk management across all Member States and to measure performance against intended outcomes.

5) Promote interagency cooperation and information-sharing between customs and other authorities at the Member State and EU level

For ensuring that risks are effectively identified and addressed by the competent authorities at the most appropriate time and place in the supply chain and with minimal disruption to the movement of the goods;

By developing further the cooperation arrangements between customs and other competent authorities, including other law enforcement and security agencies, with a view to ensuring complementarity of roles in supply chain risk management, promoting the development of common risk criteria, where appropriate, and improving the accessibility and sharing of risk information;

By promoting and gaining broader recognition of the EU Authorised Economic Operator programme by non-customs authorities/regulators.

6) Enhance co-operation with trade

For better focus on risks while facilitating supply chains and accelerating trade;

By pursuing partnerships with legitimate economic operators, supply chain actors and logistics providers, in particular to:

-    improve knowledge and visibility of international supply chains, in particular in the framework of the e-Freight initiative;

-    detect new trends of illicit trade crossing EU borders and supply chain threats;

-    promote the re-use of customs data submitted electronically by economic operators to streamline customs procedures, and thus reduce costs and improve efficiency;

-    promote and strengthen the EU Authorised Economic Operator programme, and further facilitate legitimate trade.

7) Tap the potential of international customs co-operation

For better identification of risks, more effective risk mitigation and cost reduction for operators and authorities;

By active participation in the setting of global standards in multilateral fora;

By implementing or promoting the development of international norms and standards through multilateral and bilateral initiatives with trading partners including exchanges of customs information and fluid trade lane arrangements;

By continuing to pursue recognition of the EU AEO programme by international trading partners and mutual recognition of trusted trader programmes and controls, where appropriate.

ACTION PLAN

Objective 1: Improve data quality and filing arrangements for effective risk management

Action || Description of action || Indicative timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

1.1. Exercise the empowerment granted in the Union Customs Code (UCC) to adopt Commission (COM) acts || For goods brought into the customs territory of the Union: ― Conclude the analysis for necessary improvement of entry summary declaration (ENS) data, taking into account different business models, the results of air cargo security pilot actions, and evaluation of the Import Control System (ICS)[1]. ― Propose a harmonised solution for collection and integration of ENS data from trade sources, based on analysis of costs and benefits and associated implementation issues (including technical, financial and organisational aspects). || 2014 - 2015 || Commission (COM) || ― Implementation study ― Adopt COM acts

1.2. Develop and implement appropriate IT solutions || ― Adjust and further develop necessary IT systems for ENS data submission by economic operators, and its collection and integration for customs authorities. ― Develop IT access by customs to the economic operators systems in the area of aviation security || 2016 – 2020[2] || COM, Member States (MS), Economic operators (EO) || IT systems adjusted and further developed at the MS and EU level

Objective 2: Ensure availability of supply chain data, sharing of risk relevant information and control results among customs authorities to analyse and mitigate risks and ensure equivalent treatment of economic operators

Action || Description of action || Indicative timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

2.1. Bring forward  solutions and exercise the empowerment granted in the UCC to adopt COM acts || ― Based on analysis of costs and benefits, and associated implementation issues (including technical, financial and organisational aspects) propose harmonised  solutions for goods: a) brought into the customs territory of the Union, b) placed under customs procedure following their entry into the customs territory of the Union, c) exported and brought out of the customs territory of the Union || 2014 - 2015 2015 – 2016 2016 – 2017 || COM || ― Implementation studies ― Adopt COM acts, where appropriate ― Common guidelines for customs authorities

2.2. Develop and implement appropriate IT solutions || Adjust and further develop necessary IT systems for availability and sharing, among customs authorities, of supply chain data, availability and sharing of risk relevant information, including control results, among EU customs authorities. || 2016 – 2020[3] || COM, MS || IT systems further developed: ―national customs risk management systems ― ICS, New Computerised Transit System (NCTS), and Customs Risk Management System (CRMS)

2.3. Propose solutions for traceability of goods movements during various customs control stages || ―Analysis of options for traceability of goods movements  through various stages of customs supervision from their entry into the Union customs territory to their final customs clearance,  taking account of on-going initiatives such as e-Manifest , e-Freight and/or by adjusting the existing customs transactions systems ― Put forward the appropriate approach, taking into account relevant aspects (IT, legal  or procedural) || 2015-2020 || COM || ―  Analysis report identifying option(s) ― Solutions allowing traceability implemented

Objective 3: Implement the concept of ‘Assess in advance - control where required’ to respond adequately to identified EU and national risks while maximising efficiency in the use of resources and fluidity of the supply chain

Action || Description of action || Indicative timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

3.1. Develop methodologies to implement the concept of ‘Assess in advance – control where required’ || Propose a methodology to determine the most appropriate place and time for the application of customs controls and risk mitigation measures based on the type/level of risk, control and supply chain constraints (availability of information, documentation, and control possibilities). ||  2014-2016 || COM || Concept document

3.2. Perform ‘proof of concept’ within the main policy areas and propose appropriate solutions || ―Identify the main policy areas and undertake operational actions to test solutions e.g. through Priority Control Area (PCA) actions in co-operation with relevant stakeholders ― COM will  propose customs control clauses for non- customs legislation on policy areas tested, where appropriate and by taking into account outcomes of ‘proof of concept’ || 2015-2016 || COM || ― Proof of concept ― COM proposal for updated customs control clauses for non-customs legislation, where appropriate

Objective 4: Strengthen capacities to secure equivalence in effective implementation of the Common Risk Management Framework (CRMF) and to increase responsiveness to newly identified risks

Action || Description of action || Indicative timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

4.1. Identify and address weaknesses and inappropriate variances in the implementation of the CRMF, where relevant through EU level support || ―  Analyse, determine and put forward appropriate solutions (including IT), where relevant through  EU level support: a) to address inappropriate variances in implementation of common risk criteria and standards, b) for necessary technical and functional requirements of the MS risk management systems, c) for professional skill requirements in the area of risk analysis and targeting. || 2014 - 2020 || COM, MS || ― Report of the analysis. ― At MS and/or EU level further necessary IT and other relevant risk management capabilities are developed (e.g. training schemes)

4.2. Develop possible further capacities and enhance co-operation and co-ordination between customs authorities || ― Based on strategic requirements identify which risk management capacities should be developed further at the MS level, and at EU level (taking into account the benefits of EU data repository or alternatives as well as results of relevant EU funded research projects). ― Identify, linked to the action 2.1 and by further analysis, ways to further enhance pro-active co-operation between the MS to: a) support effective and efficient risk management of the supply chain, b) ensure controls are allocated and carried out at the most appropriate place in the chain , the results are exchanged between customs authorities and gaps or un-necessary controls are avoided,  c) enhance complementarity between customs risk based controls and customs investigations, by inter-alia defining appropriate governance to ensure that development and administration of the existing and future IT systems are formally shared between the relevant COM services in accordance with data protection rules. ― Facilitate the analysis and assessment of potential approaches, including the possible creation of a flexible structure and solutions for better risk assessment on a real time basis, by the piloting of joint initiatives between willing Member States ― Put forward and implement appropriate solutions (including IT) for developing necessary further risk management capacities at MS and EU level (considering also solutions proposed by EU funded research projects) including enhanced co-operation and co-ordination between the customs authorities || 2014 - 2020 || COM, MS || ― Report of the analysis and/or evaluation of the outcomes of the pilot(s) ― At MS level further necessary IT and other relevant risk management capabilities are developed ― At EU level further necessary IT risk management capabilities (e.g. enhanced CRMS), or other relevant capacities are developed

4.3. Develop further national and EU level customs threat and risk assessments for the full range of threats and risks || ―Ensure at MS and EU level, taking account of existing instruments, procedures and methodologies: a) customs  threat and risk assessments are established for the full range of risks and shared between the MS and MS and the COM b) integration of these assessments in customs risk management, including into the common risk criteria and standards, where appropriate || 2015 onward || COM, MS || ― Customs threat and risk assessments developed at MS and EU level

4.4. Further develop EU common risk criteria and standards (CRC) for the full range of risks, in cooperation with the competent services || ― Develop further and implement CRC for the full range of risks, where necessary together with the competent services, taking into account identified priorities and initiatives. || 2014 onward || COM || ― COM acts  in the framework of the current CCC and UCC establishing CRC, ― CRC implemented via Priority Control Actions

4.5. Systematically monitor, evaluate and improve implementation of the EU risk management by the MS and measure performance of the CRMF || ― Systematic monitoring and evaluation of EU risk management measures, to ensure harmonised, effective and efficient application   ― Continue to evaluate and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the existing CRC through COM annual evaluation reports and their follow-up ― Improve further methods and procedures for EU level monitoring, evaluation and review of effectiveness of the CRC, where necessary in cooperation with competent services, and identify information that needs to be collected and made available to the COM by the MS || 2014 onward || COM, MS || CRMF performance measurement implemented: ― COM annual evaluation reports ― Priority Controls Area report recommendations

Objective 5: Promote interagency cooperation and information sharing between customs and other authorities at the MS and EU level to ensure effective risk management

Action || Description of action || Indicative timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

5.1. Develop further cross-sectoral co-operation arrangements, improve sharing and accessibility of (risk) information, and customs involvement in risk and threat assessments || ― In the relevant policy areas explore how to enhance further: a) (risk) information accessibility, sharing, and timely integration for risk management of supply chains, including in crisis situations,   b) co-operation arrangements to ensure complementarity between customs risk based controls and controls carried out by other competent authorities,  c) access to threat and risk assessments by customs at MS and EU level for customs risk management ―Put forward possible solutions at MS and EU level taking  account of different distribution of competences between  authorities within each MS, notably in the area of law enforcement and related initiatives, such as e-Freight and CISE || 2015-2020 || COM, MS || ― Improvements in systematic sharing and accessibility of (risk) information ― COM  implementing act  in the framework of the proposed Council Regulation on Official controls (COM (2013) 265)  ― Appropriate access for customs to risk and threat assessments

5.2. Strengthen the EU Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) programme through broader recognition and promotion by other authorities ||  ― Identify priority areas in co-operation with other competent authorities, taking into account on-going initiatives ― Carry-out analysis of the requirements in relation to other partnership programmes or control regimes stemming from other authorities with a view to identify: a) complementarities and synergies between AEO and other programmes b) measures needed to integrate AEO status within the control regimes of other competent authorities c) compliance criteria developed by other authorities that AEO programme should reflect ― COM will propose adequate solutions, where necessary and possible || 2014-2020 || COM || ― Feasibility studies followed by proposals where appropriate

5.3. Promote use of good practices and cooperation methods between customs and other national authorities  || ― MS to initiate, with COM support, exchange of good practices and cooperation methods || 2014-2020 || MS, COM || Study/report with recommendations 

Objective 6: Enhance further co-operation with trade through partnership with economic operators and logistic providers to better focus on risks and accelerate customs clearance of legitimate trade  

Actions || Description of action || Indicative timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

6.1. Continue to strengthen and promote AEO programme, by addressing any relevant weaknesses identified and providing further benefits || ―With relevant stakeholders further develop systematic analyses and address relevant weaknesses of AEO implementation to ensure continuous robustness of the programme ― Identify additional AEO benefits within the customs processes and propose adequate measures, taking into account legal and procedural aspects || 2014-2020 || COM || ― Adopt COM acts in the framework of the UCC, where appropriate ― AEO common guidelines updated

6.2 Improve the knowledge of supply chains, raise trade awareness and exploit valuable data available to trade || ― Put forward and implement appropriate solutions for improved customs risk management through increased supply chain visibility by: a) exploring, in the frame of e-Freight initiative,  how best to utilise outcomes of relevant research projects (e.g. FP7Cassandra and CORE), and by completing the on-going ENS-Container Status Message (CSM) pilot project, b) exploring how best to utilise commercial databases  ― Conduct, at the MS and EU level, outreach, awareness raising with trade to reach consistent standards in customs data quality and better understanding of the supply chain vulnerabilities, threats and trends || 2014-2020 || COM, MS || ―  CSM collected and exploited for risk management purposes ― Analysis report in relation to commercial databases and research projects ―At MS and EU level outreach and awareness raising campaigns organised with the trade

6.3. Promote compliance management by customs administrations in close co-operation with trade || ― Identify the best practices by comparing national programmes and explore possibilities for establishing a harmonised approach to client segmentation, as an element of the overall concept which complements the AEO programme || 2014-2020 || COM || ―Identification of best practices and feasibility analysis

6.4. Promote the re-use of customs data submitted electronically by economic operators to streamline customs procedures || ― Identify, in co-operation with trade, customs formalities, processes and areas where re-use of data required by EU customs legislation will increase efficiency for economic operators and customs administrations || 2014-2020 || COM, MS || ― Feasibility analysis

Objective 7: Tap the potential of international customs co-operation, to improve risk management of the supply chain

Actions || Description of action || Timetable || Responsible Actors || Deliverable

7.1. Develop international co-operation through multilateral and bilateral initiatives || ― Appropriate to different trading partners determine operational cooperation models, including AEO customs mutual recognition (AEO MR), trusted and fluid trade lanes and information exchange requirements ― Taking account of developments at global level, define EU standards for exchange of information of: a) AEO MR data b) data from customs transaction systems c) risk relevant information ― Further develop bilateral co-operation with third countries including through pilot actions, comparison and testing of supply chain  security technologies ― COM will propose adequate solutions  || 2014-2020 || COM, Council and EP || ― International co-operation models elaborated ―  EU standards for exchange of customs information with third countries ― Appropriate provisions in the international customs cooperation agreements ― Reports under the supply chain security research project  CORE (FP7)

7.2 Implement appropriate cost effective IT solutions to enable international cooperation || Implement necessary cost-effective IT solutions enabling international cooperation to support EU customs authorities in detecting risks (i.e. exchange of AEO MR data, information from customs transaction systems and relevant risk information) || 2014-2020 || COM, MS || IT capacities are being developed at MS and/or EU level

7.3. Ensure that the EU and its Member States play a proactive role in the development of global standards in the relevant multilateral fora || Continue ensuring proactive EU input in establishment of the international standards and ensure international norms and standards are respected and implemented, such as those developed by the WCO, IMO, ICAO, UPU and UNECE || 2014-2020 || COM, MS || International standards developed with pro-active input by the EU

[1] COM (2012) 793, 8.1.2013

[2] Timeframes will be further refined as part of the COM Implementing Decision on Work Programme for the UCC (2014/255/EU, 29.4.2014)

[3] Timeframes will be further refined as part of the COM Implementing Decision on Work Programme for the UCC (2014/255/EU, 29.4.2014)

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