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Renewable energy

Renewable energy

 

SUMMARY OF:

Directive (EU) 2018/2001 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources

WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE DIRECTIVE?

  • It recasts and repeals previous legislation (Directive 2009/28/EC, Directive (EU) 2015/1513 and Council Directive 2013/18/EU).
  • It establishes a common system to promote energy from renewable sources* across the different sectors. In particular, it aims to:
    • set a binding EU target for its share in the energy mix in 2030;
    • regulate self-consumption for the first time; and
    • establish a common set of rules for the use of renewables in electricity, heating and cooling, and transport in the EU.
  • The increased use of energy from renewable sources will be crucial to combat climate change, protect our environment and reduce our energy dependency, as well as to contribute to the EU’s technological and industrial leadership and the creation of jobs and growth, including in rural and isolated areas.

KEY POINTS

Promoting renewable forms of energy is one of the goals of EU energy policy. The increased use of energy from renewable sources is an important part of the package of measures needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to comply with the 2015 Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the EU policy framework for climate and energy (2020 to 2030).

This recast directive, along with the revised Energy Efficiency Directive and a new Governance Regulation, is part of the Clean Energy for All Europeans package, which aims to provide new, comprehensive rules on energy regulation for the next decade.

The directive:

  • ensures that the EU’s binding target is achieved cost-effectively;
  • establishes a stable, market-oriented European approach to renewable electricity;
  • provides long-term certainty for investors and speeds up procedures for permits to build projects;
  • enables consumers to take part in the energy transition with the right to produce their own renewable energy;
  • increasing the use of renewables in the heating and cooling and the transport sectors;
  • strengthens EU sustainability criteria for bioenergy.

The directive includes:

  • a binding EU overall target for 2030 of at least 32% of energy from renewable sources;
  • rules for cost-effective and market-based financial support for electricity from renewable sources;
  • protection of support schemes from modifications which put existing projects at risk;
  • cooperation mechanisms between EU countries, and between EU countries and non-EU countries;
  • simplification of administrative procedures for renewables projects (including one-stop-shops, time-limits, and digitalisation);
  • an improved guarantee of origin system, extended to all renewables;
  • rules allowing consumers to produce their own electricity, individually or as part of renewable energy communities, without undue restrictions;
  • in the heating and cooling sector:
    • an annual increase of 1.3 percentage points in the share of renewable energy in the sector
    • the right for consumers to disconnect from inefficient district heating and cooling systems and
    • third-party access for suppliers of renewables and waste heat and cooling to district heating and cooling networks;
  • in the transport sector:
    • a binding target of 14% with
    • a specific sub-target for advanced biofuels of 3.5% and
    • caps on conventional biofuels and on high indirect land use change risk* biofuels;
  • strengthened EU sustainability criteria for bioenergy, by extending their scope to cover all fuels produced from biomass regardless of their final energy use.

FROM WHEN DOES THE DIRECTIVE APPLY?

It has applied since 24 December 2018 and has to become law in EU countries by 30 June 2021.

BACKGROUND

For more information, see:

KEY TERMS

Energy from renewable sources: energy from renewable non-fossil sources, such as wind, solar (thermal and photovoltaic), aerothermal, geothermal, hydrothermal, ambient heat, tide, wave and other ocean energy, hydropower, biomass, landfill gas, sewage treatment plant gas and biogases.
Indirect land use change risk: changes in land use are brought about by growing more crops for ethanol or biodiesel production in response to the increased global demand for biofuels. There can be unintended consequences, including releasing more carbon emissions.

MAIN DOCUMENT

Directive (EU) 2018/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (recast) (OJ L 328, 21.12.2018, pp. 82-209)

RELATED DOCUMENTS

Regulation (EU) 2018/1999 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 on the Governance of the Energy Union and Climate Action, amending Regulations (EC) No 663/2009 and (EC) No 715/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Directives 94/22/EC, 98/70/EC, 2009/31/EC, 2009/73/EC, 2010/31/EU, 2012/27/EU and 2013/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council, Council Directives 2009/119/EC and (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 328, 21.12.2018, pp. 1-77)

Directive (EU) 2018/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2018 amending Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency (OJ L 328, 21.12.2018, pp. 210-230)

Directive 2012/27/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on energy efficiency, amending Directives 2009/125/EC and 2010/30/EU and repealing Directives 2004/8/EC and 2006/32/EC (OJ L 315, 14.11.2012, pp. 1-56)

See consolidated version.

Directive 2009/28/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources and amending and subsequently repealing Directives 2001/77/EC and 2003/30/EC (OJ L 140, 5.6.2009, pp. 16-62)

last update 31.01.2019

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