Accept Refuse

EUR-Lex Access to European Union law

This document is an excerpt from the EUR-Lex website

Document 52016XC0527(01)

Publication pursuant to Article 26(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs as regards a name of traditional speciality guaranteed

OJ C 188, 27.5.2016, p. 6–43 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

27.5.2016   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 188/6


Publication pursuant to Article 26(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs as regards a name of traditional speciality guaranteed

(2016/C 188/06)

In accordance with the first subparagraph of Article 26(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council (1), Poland submitted (2) the names ‘Półtorak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Dwójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Trójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Czwórniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa staropolska’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska staropolska’, ‘Olej rydzowy tradycyjny’ and ‘Kabanosy staropolskie’ as names of a traditional speciality guaranteed (TSG), which comply with Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012. The names ‘Półtorak’, ‘Dwójniak’, ‘Trójniak’, ‘Czwórniak’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’, ‘Olej rydzowy’ and ‘Kabanosy’ had previously been registered (3) without reservation of name in accordance with Article 13(1) of Council Regulation (EC) No 509/2006 (4) as traditional specialities guaranteed and they are currently protected in accordance with Article 25(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012.

Following the national opposition procedure referred to in the second subparagraph of Article 26(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012:

the names ‘Półtorak’, ‘Dwójniak’, ‘Trójniak’ and ‘Czwórniak’ were complemented by the term ‘staropolski tradycyjny’,

the names ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’ and ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’ were complemented by the term ‘staropolska’,

the name ‘Olej rydzowy’ was complemented by the term ‘tradycyjny’,

the name ‘Kabanosy’ was complemented by the term ‘staropolskie’.

All these complementing terms identify the traditional and specific character of the name, in accordance with the third subparagraph of Article 26(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012.

In the light of the above, the Commission hereby publishes the names

‘Półtorak staropolski tradycyjny’

‘Dwójniak staropolski tradycyjny’

‘Trójniak staropolski tradycyjny’

‘Czwórniak staropolski tradycyjny’

‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa staropolska’

‘Kiełbasa myśliwska staropolska’

‘Olej rydzowy tradycyjny’

‘Kabanosy staropolskie’

in view of enabling them to be registered in the register of traditional specialities guaranteed provided for in Article 22 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012.

This publication confers the right to oppose the names ‘Półtorak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Dwójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Trójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Czwórniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa staropolska’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska staropolska’, ‘Olej rydzowy tradycyjny’ and ‘Kabanosy staropolskie’ being entered in the register of traditional specialities guaranteed provided for in Article 22 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, pursuant to Article 51 of that Regulation.

In case the names ‘Półtorak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Dwójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Trójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Czwórniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa staropolska’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska staropolska’, ‘Olej rydzowy tradycyjny’ and ‘Kabanosy staropolskie’ are entered in the register, in accordance with Article 26(4) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, the current product specification of the TSG ‘Półtorak’, ‘Dwójniak’, ‘Trójniak’, ‘Czwórniak’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’, ‘Olej rydzowy’ and ‘Kabanosy’ shall be deemed to be the specification referred to in Article 19 of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 for the TSG ‘Półtorak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Dwójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Trójniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Czwórniak staropolski tradycyjny’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa staropolska’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska staropolska’, ‘Olej rydzowy tradycyjny’ and ‘Kabanosy staropolskie’ respectively, protected with reservation of name.

For sake of completeness and in accordance with Article 26(2) of Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012, this publication includes the specification of the TSG ‘Półtorak’, ‘Dwójniak’, ‘Trójniak’, ‘Czwórniak’, ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’, ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’ and ‘Olej rydzowy’ as already published in the Official Journal of the European Union  (5) and of the TSG ‘Kabanosy’, as published in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 1044/2011 (6).

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘PÓŁTORAK’

EC No PL-TSG-007-0034-06.09.2005

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Krajowa Rada Winiarstwa i Miodosytnictwa przy Stowarzyszeniu Naukowo-Technicznym Inżynierów i Techników Przemysłu Spożywczego

Address:

ul. Czackiego 3/6

00-043 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228282721

Email:

krwim@sitspoz.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name to be registered

‘Półtorak’

When the product is placed on the market, the label may contain the following information: ‘miód pitny wytworzony zgodnie ze staropolską tradycją’ (mead produced in accordance with an old Polish tradition). This information should be translated into other official languages.

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name ‘półtorak’ derives from the numeral ‘one and a half’ (PL: ‘półtora’) and relates directly to the historically established composition and method of production of ‘półtorak’ — the proportions of honey and water in the mead wort being one part honey to 0,5 part water. The name therefore expresses the specific character of the product. Since the term ‘półtorak’ is a word that is used solely to denote a specific type of mead, the name should also be considered to be specific in itself.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.8. Other products of Annex I

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

‘Półtorak’ is a mead, a clear beverage fermented from mead wort, distinguished by its characteristic honey aroma and the taste of the raw material used.

The flavour of ‘półtorak’ may be enriched by the taste of spices that are used. The colour of ‘półtorak’ ranges from golden to dark amber and depends on the type of honey used for production.

The physico-chemical indicators typical for ‘półtorak’ mead are:

alcohol content: 15-18 % vol.,

reducing sugars after inversion: more than 300 g/l,

total acidity expressed as malic acid: 3,5-8 g/l,

volatile acidity expressed as acetic acid: max. 1,4 g/l,

total sugar, on the basis of the actual alcohol concentration (in % vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 600 g,

non-sugar extract: not less than

30 g/l,

35 g/l in the case of fruit mead (melomel),

ash: min. 1,3 g/l — in the case of fruit mead.

The use of preservatives, stabilisers and artificial colourings and flavourings is prohibited in the production of ‘półtorak’.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

Raw materials:

Natural honey with the following parameters:

water content: max. 20 % (m/m),

reducing sugar content: min. 70 % (m/m),

combined sucrose and melezitose content: max. 5 % (m/m),

total acidity — 1 mol/l NaOH solution per 100g of honey: within the range 1-5 ml,

5-hydroxy-methyl-furfurol (HMF) content: max. 4,0 mg per 100 g honey.

High-attenuation mead yeast — suitable for attenuation of high extracts in pitched wort.

Herbs and spices: cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger.

Natural fruit juices or fresh fruit.

Ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin (possibly).

Production method:

Stage 1

Brewing (boiling) of the mead wort at a temperature of 95-105 °C. The required proportions of honey and water for ‘półtorak’ are one part honey to 0,5 part water (or water mixed with fruit juice) in the finished product. As the sugar concentration is too high for the yeast to work in the fermentation process, a wort with the following proportions is prepared: one part honey to two parts water, to which herbs or spices may be added. In the case of fruit meads, at least 30 % of the water is replaced with fruit juice. In order to maintain the appropriate proportions of honey and water that are characteristic of ‘półtorak’, the rest of the honey is added in the final stage of fermentation or during ageing.

Strict adherence to the proportions of water and honey and obtaining the required extract in a wort kettle fitted with a steam jacket. This method of brewing prevents caramelisation of the sugars.

Stage 2

Cooling of the wort to 20-22 °C, the optimum temperature for yeast to propagate. The wort must be cooled on the day of production, and the cooling time depends on the efficiency of the cooler. Cooling guarantees the microbiological safety of the wort.

Stage 3

Pitching, addition of a yeast solution to the wort in a fermentation tank.

Stage 4

A.

Violent fermentation — 6-10 days. Keeping the temperature at a maximum level of 28 °C ensures that the fermentation process runs properly.

B.

Still fermentation — 3-6 weeks. The still fermentation period ensures that the proper physico-chemical parameters are attained.

At this stage it is possible to add the remaining quantity of honey to achieve the required proportion in ‘półtorak’.

Stage 5

Racking of the attenuated pitched wort

After obtaining an alcohol content of at least 12 % vol., racking prior to ageing should be carried out. This guarantees that the mead has the appropriate physico-chemical and organoleptic properties. Leaving the pitched wort on the lees beyond the still fermentation period adversely affects the organoleptic properties, owing to yeast autolysis.

Stage 6

Ageing (maturing) and siphoning (decanting) — this is repeated as necessary to prevent unwanted processes from taking place in the lees (yeast autolysis). During ageing it is possible to carry out operations such as pasteurisation and filtration. At this stage it is possible to add the remaining quantity of honey to achieve the required proportion in ‘półtorak’, if this has not been done in the final phase of fermentation. This stage is essential for ensuring that the product has the right organoleptic properties.

The minimum ageing time for ‘półtorak’ is three years.

Stage 7

Flavour-adjustment (composition) — this stage concerns the preparation of a final product having the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties appropriate to ‘półtorak’, as specified in point 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’. In order to ensure that the required parameters are attained, it is possible to correct the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties by:

adding honey to sweeten the mead,

adding herbs and spices,

adding ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin.

The aim of this stage is to obtain a product with the characteristic ‘półtorak’ bouquet.

Stage 8

Pouring into unit containers at a temperature of 18-25 °C. It is recommended that ‘półtorak’ be presented in traditional packaging, such as: carboys, ceramic containers or oak barrels.

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The specific character of ‘półtorak’ results from:

the preparation of the wort (composition and proportion of raw materials),

ageing and maturing,

its physico-chemical and organoleptic properties.

Preparation of the wort (composition):

The specific character of ‘półtorak’ results in particular from the use of, and strict adherence to, the established proportions of honey and water — one part honey to 0,5 parts water — in the mead wort. This proportion is the determining factor in all further stages in the production of ‘półtorak’ that impart its unique properties.

Ageing and maturing:

According to the traditional old Polish recipe, the character of the product depends on its being aged and matured for a specified period of time. In the case of ‘półtorak’ this period is at least three years.

Physico-chemical and organoleptic properties:

Observance of all the stages of production included in the specification ensures that a product of unique taste and aroma is obtained. The unique taste and odour of ‘półtorak’ is the result of appropriate sugar and alcohol content:

reducing sugars after inversion: > 300 g/l,

total sugar, on the basis of the actual alcohol concentration (in % vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 600 g,

alcohol: 15-18 % vol.

Owing to strictly defined proportions of the ingredients used in its production, ‘półtorak’ possesses a typically viscous and runny consistency which distinguishes it from other types of mead.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

Traditional production method:

Mead production in Poland is a tradition which dates back over a thousand years and is characterised by great diversity. The development and improvement of the production method over the centuries has given rise to many types of mead. The history of mead production dates back to the beginnings of Poland’s statehood. In 966, the Spanish diplomat, merchant and traveller, Ibrahim ibn Yaqub, wrote: ‘Besides food, meat and land for ploughing, the country of Mieszko I abounds in mead, which is what the Slavic wines and intoxicating drinks are called’ (Mieszko I was the first historic king of Poland). The Chronicles of Gallus Anonymus, who recorded Polish history at the turn of the 11th and 12th centuries, also contain numerous references to the production of mead.

The Polish national epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’ by Adam Mickiewicz, which tells the story of the nobility between 1811 and 1812, contains a good deal of information on the production, consumption and different types of mead. Mentions of mead can also be found in the poems of Tomasz Zan (1796-1855) and in Henryk Sienkiewicz’s trilogy describing events in Poland in the 17th century (‘Ogniem i mieczem’, published in 1884; ‘Potop’, published in 1886 and ‘Pan Wołodyjowski’, published in 1887 and 1888).

Source materials describing Polish culinary traditions of the 17th and 18th centuries contain not only general references to mead, but also references to different types of mead. Depending on the production method, they were called ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’. Each of these names relates to a different type of mead, produced on the basis of different proportions of honey and water or juice, and different ageing times. The ‘półtorak’ production technique has been used, with minor modifications, for centuries.

Traditional composition:

The traditional division of mead into ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’ has existed in Poland for centuries and still exists in consumers’ consciousness to this day. After the Second World War attempts were made to regulate the traditional division of mead into four categories. This division was finally enshrined in Polish law in 1948 by means of the Act on the production of wines, wine musts, meads and trade in such products (Journal of Laws of the Republic of Poland of 18 November 1948). This Act contains rules on the production of meads, specifying the proportions of honey and water and the technological requirements. The proportions of water and honey for ‘półtorak’ are given as follows: ‘Only mead produced from one part natural honey and a half part water may be called ‘półtorak’.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character

Mandatory checking encompasses:

adherence to the established proportions of ingredients in the mead wort,

adherence to the length of the ageing time,

organoleptic properties of the finished product (taste, odour, colour, clarity),

physico-chemical indicators of the finished product: alcohol content, total sugar, reducing sugar after inversion, total acidity, volatile acidity, non-sugar extract, and ash in the case of fruit meads — the values should correspond to the values specified at point 3.5 of the specification.

Mandatory checks are carried out at least once a year.

It is recommended that checks also be carried out during the production stages listed below. Checks at the production stages listed below are not mandatory, but are advisable, because they help eliminate possible errors occurring at different stages of production:

Stage 4:

During the fermentation process, regular laboratory tests should be carried out on organoleptic properties (taste and odour) and physico-chemical parameters such as alcohol content and content of sugars that are subject to change during the alcoholic fermentation process.

Stage 6:

During ageing, regular checks should be carried out on the basic organoleptic properties of the product and physico-chemical indicators such as alcohol content, total sugar, total acidity and volatile acidity.

Stage 8:

Before bottling, checks are carried out on the various physico-chemical and organoleptic parameters specified at 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification:

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno — Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232900

Fax

+48 226232998

Email:

☒ Public

☐ Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The inspection authority above is responsible for the verification of the entirety of the specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘DWÓJNIAK’

EC No: PL-TSG-007-0036-06.09.2005

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Krajowa Rada Winiarstwa i Miodosytnictwa przy Stowarzyszeniu Naukowo-Technicznym Inżynierów i Techników Przemysłu Spożywczego

Address:

ul. Czackiego 3/6

00-043 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228282721

Email:

krwim@sitspoz.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name to be registered

‘Dwójniak’

When the product is placed on the market, the label may contain the following information: ‘miód pitny wytworzony zgodnie ze staropolską tradycją’ (mead produced in accordance with an old Polish tradition). This information should be translated into other official languages.

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name ‘dwójniak’ derives from the numeral ‘two’ (PL: ‘dwa’) and relates directly to the historically established composition and method of production of ‘dwójniak’ — the proportions of honey and water in the mead wort being one part honey to one part water. The name therefore expresses the specific character of the product. Since the term ‘dwójniak’ is a word that is used solely to denote a specific type of mead, the name should also be considered to be specific in itself.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.8. Other products of Annex I

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

‘Dwójniak’ is a mead, a clear beverage fermented from mead wort, distinguished by its characteristic honey aroma and the taste of the raw material used.

The flavour of ‘dwójniak’ may be enriched by the taste of spices that are used. The colour of ‘dwójniak’ ranges from golden to dark amber and depends on the type of honey used for production.

The physico-chemical indicators typical for ‘dwójniak’ mead are:

alcohol content: 15-18 % vol.,

reducing sugars after inversion: 175-230 g/l,

total acidity expressed as malic acid: 3,5-8 g/l,

volatile acidity expressed as acetic acid: max. 1,4 g/l,

total sugar (g) added to actual alcohol content (% vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 490,

non-sugar extract: not less than

25 g/l,

30 g/l in the case of fruit mead (melomel),

ash: min. 1,3 g/l — in the case of fruit mead.

The use of preservatives, stabilisers and artificial colourings and flavourings is prohibited in the production of ‘dwójniak’.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

Raw materials:

Natural honey with the following parameters:

water content: max. 20 % (m/m),

reducing sugar content: min. 70 % (m/m),

combined sucrose and melezitose content: max. 5 % (m/m),

total acidity — 1 mol/l NaOH solution per 100 g of honey: within the range 1-5 ml,

5-hydroxy-methyl-furfurol (HMF) content: max. 4,0 mg per 100 g honey.

High-attenuation mead yeast — suitable for attenuation of high extracts in pitched wort.

Herbs and spices: cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger.

Natural fruit juices or fresh fruit.

Ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin (possibly).

Production method:

Stage 1

Brewing (boiling) of the mead wort at a temperature of 95–105 °C. The required proportions of honey and water for ‘dwójniak’ are one part honey to one part water (or water mixed with fruit juice) in the finished product. As the sugar concentration is too high for the yeast to work in the fermentation process, a wort with the following proportions is prepared: one part honey to two parts water, to which herbs or spices may be added. In the case of fruit meads, at least 30 % of the water is replaced with fruit juice. In order to maintain the appropriate proportions of honey and water that are characteristic of ‘dwójniak’, the rest of the honey is added in the final stage of fermentation or during ageing.

Strict adherence to the proportions of water and honey and obtaining the required extract in a wort kettle fitted with a steam jacket. This method of brewing prevents caramelisation of the sugars.

Stage 2

Cooling of the wort to 20-22 °C, the optimum temperature for yeast to propagate. The wort must be cooled on the day of production, and the cooling time depends on the efficiency of the cooler. Cooling guarantees the microbiological safety of the wort.

Stage 3

Pitching, addition of a yeast solution to the wort in a fermentation tank.

Stage 4

A.

Violent fermentation — 6-10 days. Keeping the temperature at a maximum level of 28 °C ensures that the fermentation process runs properly.

B.

Still fermentation — 3-6 weeks. The still fermentation period ensures that the proper physico-chemical parameters are attained.

At this stage it is possible to add the remaining quantity of honey to achieve the required proportion in ‘dwójniak’.

Stage 5

Racking of the attenuated pitched wort

After obtaining an alcohol content of at least 12 % vol., racking prior to ageing should be carried out. This guarantees that the mead has the appropriate physico-chemical and organoleptic properties. Leaving the pitched wort on the lees beyond the still fermentation period adversely affects the organoleptic properties, owing to yeast autolysis.

Stage 6

Ageing (maturing) and siphoning (decanting) — this is repeated as necessary to prevent unwanted processes from taking place in the lees (yeast autolysis). During ageing it is possible to carry out operations such as pasteurisation and filtration.

At this stage it is possible to add the remaining quantity of honey to achieve the required proportion in ‘dwójniak’, if this has not been done in the final phase of fermentation. This stage is essential for ensuring that the product has the right organoleptic properties.

The minimum ageing time for ‘dwójniak’ is two years.

Stage 7

Flavour-adjustment (composition) — this stage concerns the preparation of a final product having the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties appropriate to ‘dwójniak’, as specified in point 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’. In order to ensure that the required parameters are attained, it is possible to correct the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties by:

adding honey to sweeten the mead,

adding herbs and spices,

adding ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin.

The aim of this stage is to obtain a product with the characteristic ‘dwójniak’ bouquet.

Stage 8

Pouring into unit containers at a temperature of 18-25 °C. It is recommended that ‘dwójniak’ be presented in traditional packaging, such as: carboys, ceramic containers or oak barrels.

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The specific character of ‘dwójniak’ results from:

the preparation of the wort (composition and proportions of raw materials),

ageing and maturing,

its physico-chemical and organoleptic properties.

Preparation of the wort (composition and proportions of raw materials):

The specific character of ‘dwójniak’ results in particular from the use of, and strict adherence to, the established proportions of honey and water — one part honey to one part water — in the mead wort. This proportion is the determining factor in all further stages in the production of ‘dwójniak’ that impart its unique properties.

Ageing and maturing:

According to the traditional old Polish recipe, the character of the product depends on its being aged and matured for a specified period of time. In the case of ‘dwójniak’ this period is at least two years.

Physico-chemical and organoleptic properties:

Observance of all the stages of production included in the specification ensures that a product of unique taste and aroma is obtained. The unique taste and odour of ‘dwójniak’ is the result of appropriate sugar and alcohol content:

reducing sugars after inversion: 175-230 g/l,

total sugar (g) added to actual alcohol content (% vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 490,

alcohol: 15-18 % vol.

Owing to strictly defined proportions of the ingredients used in its production, ‘dwójniak’ possesses a typically viscous and runny consistency which distinguishes it from other types of mead.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

Traditional production method:

Mead production in Poland is a tradition which dates back over a thousand years and is characterised by great diversity. The development and improvement of the production method over the centuries has given rise to many types of mead. The history of mead production dates back to the beginnings of Poland’s statehood. In 966, the Spanish diplomat, merchant and traveller, Ibrahim ibn Yaqub, wrote: ‘Besides food, meat and land for ploughing, the country of Mieszko I abounds in mead, which is what the Slavic wines and intoxicating drinks are called’ (Mieszko I was the first historic king of Poland). The Chronicles of Gallus Anonymus, who recorded Polish history at the turn of the 11th and 12th centuries, also contain numerous references to the production of mead.

The Polish national epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’ by Adam Mickiewicz, which tells the story of the nobility between 1811 and 1812, contains a good deal of information on the production, consumption and types of mead. Mentions of mead can also be found in the poems of Tomasz Zan (1796-1855) and in Henryk Sienkiewicz’s trilogy describing events in Poland in the 17th century (‘Ogniem i mieczem’, published in 1884; ‘Potop’, published in 1886 and ‘Pan Wołodyjowski’, published in 1887 and 1888).

Source materials describing Polish culinary traditions of the 17th and 18th centuries contain not only general references to mead, but also references to different types of mead. Depending on the production method, they were called ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’. Each of these names relates to a different type of mead, produced on the basis of different proportions of honey and water or juice, and different ageing times. The ‘dwójniak’ production technique has been used, with minor modifications, for centuries.

Traditional composition:

The traditional division of mead into ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’ has existed in Poland for centuries and still exists in consumers’ consciousness to this day. After the Second World War attempts were made to regulate the traditional division of mead into four categories. This division was finally enshrined in Polish law in 1948 by means of the Act on the production of wines, wine musts, meads and trade in such products (Journal of Laws of the Republic of Poland of 18 November 1948). This Act contains rules on the production of meads, specifying the proportions of honey and water and the technological requirements. The proportions of water and honey for ‘dwójniak’ are given as follows: ‘Only mead produced from one part natural honey and one part water may be called dwójniak’.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character

Mandatory checking encompasses:

adherence to the established proportions of ingredients in the mead wort,

adherence to the length of the ageing time,

organoleptic properties of the finished product (taste, odour, colour, clarity),

physico-chemical indicators of the finished product: alcohol content, total sugar, reducing sugar after inversion, total acidity, volatile acidity, non-sugar extract, and ash in the case of fruit meads — the values should correspond to the values specified at point 3.5 of the specification.

Mandatory checks are carried out at least once a year.

It is recommended that checks also be carried out during the production stages listed below. Checks at the production stages listed below are not mandatory, but are advisable, because they help eliminate possible errors occurring at different stages of production:

Stage 4:

During the fermentation process, regular laboratory tests should be carried out on organoleptic properties (taste and odour) and physico-chemical parameters such as alcohol content and content of sugars that are subject to change during the alcoholic fermentation process.

Stage 6:

During ageing, regular checks should be carried out on the basic organoleptic properties of the product and physico-chemical indicators such as alcohol content, total sugar, total acidity and volatile acidity.

Stage 8:

Before bottling, checks are carried out on the various physico-chemical and organoleptic parameters specified at 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification:

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno — Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232900

Fax

+48 226232998

Email:

☒ Public Private

☐ Public Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The inspection authority above is responsible for the verification of the entirety of the specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘TRÓJNIAK’

EC No: PL-TSG-007-0033-06.09.2005

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Krajowa Rada Winiarstwa i Miodosytnictwa przy Stowarzyszeniu Naukowo-Technicznym Inżynierów i Techników Przemysłu Spożywczego

Address:

ul. Czackiego 3/6

00-043 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228282721

Email:

krwim@sitspoz.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name to be registered

‘Trójniak’

When the product is placed on the market, the label may contain the following information: ‘miód pitny wytworzony zgodnie ze staropolską tradycją’ (mead produced in accordance with an old Polish tradition). This information should be translated into other official languages.

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name ‘trójniak’ derives from the numeral ‘three’ (PL: ‘trzy’) and relates directly to the historically established composition and method of production of ‘trójniak’ — the proportions of honey and water in the mead wort being one part honey to two parts water. The name therefore expresses the specific character of the product. Since the term ‘trójniak’ is a word that is used solely to denote a specific type of mead, the name should also be considered to be specific in itself.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.8. Other products of Annex I

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

‘Trójniak’ is a mead, a clear beverage fermented from mead wort, distinguished by its characteristic honey aroma and the taste of the raw material used.

The flavour of ‘trójniak’ may be enriched by the taste of spices that are used. The colour of ‘trójniak’ ranges from golden to dark amber and depends on the type of honey used for production.

The physico-chemical indicators typical for ‘trójniak’ mead are:

alcohol content: 12-15 % vol.,

reducing sugars after inversion: 65-120 g/l,

total acidity expressed as malic acid: 3,5-8 g/l,

volatile acidity expressed as acetic acid: max. 1,4 g/l,

total sugar, on the basis of the actual alcohol concentration (in % vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 323 g,

non-sugar extract: not less than

20 g/l,

25 g/l in the case of fruit mead (melomel),

ash: min. 1,3 g/l — in the case of fruit mead.

The use of preservatives, stabilisers and artificial colourings and flavourings is prohibited in the production of ‘trójniak’.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

Raw materials:

Natural honey with the following parameters:

water content: max. 20 % (m/m),

reducing sugar content: min. 70 % (m/m),

combined sucrose and melezitose content: max. 5 % (m/m),

total acidity — 1 mol/l NaOH solution per 100 g of honey: within the range 1-5 ml,

5-hydroxy-methyl-furfurol (HMF) content: max. 4,0 mg per 100 g honey.

High-attenuation mead yeast — suitable for attenuation of high extracts in pitched wort.

Herbs and spices: cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger.

Natural fruit juices or fresh fruit.

Production method:

Stage 1

Brewing (boiling) of the mead wort, consisting of one part honey to two parts water (or water mixed with fruit juice), to which herbs or spices may be added, at a temperature of 95-105 °C. In the case of fruit meads, at least 30 % of the water is replaced with fruit juice.

Strict adherence to the proportions of water and honey and obtaining of the required extract in a wort kettle fitted with a steam jacket. This method of brewing prevents caramelisation of the sugars.

Stage 2

Cooling of the wort to 20-22 °C, the optimum temperature for yeast to propagate. The wort must be cooled on the day of production, and the cooling time depends on the efficiency of the cooler. Cooling guarantees the microbiological safety of the wort.

Stage 3

Pitching — addition of a yeast solution to the wort in a fermentation tank.

Stage 4

A.

Violent fermentation — 6-10 days. Keeping the temperature at a maximum level of 28 °C ensures that the fermentation process runs properly.

B.

Still fermentation — 3-6 weeks. The still fermentation period ensures that the proper physico-chemical parameters are attained.

Stage 5

Racking of the attenuated pitched wort

After obtaining an alcohol content of at least 12 % vol., racking prior to ageing should be carried out. This guarantees that the mead has the appropriate physico-chemical and organoleptic properties. Leaving the pitched wort on the lees beyond the still fermentation period adversely affects the organoleptic properties, owing to yeast autolysis.

Stage 6

Ageing (maturing) and siphoning (decanting) — this is repeated as necessary to prevent unwanted processes from taking place in the lees (yeast autolysis). During ageing it is possible to carry out operations such as pasteurisation and filtration. This stage is essential for ensuring that the product has the right organoleptic properties.

The minimum ageing time for ‘trójniak’ is one year.

Stage 7

Flavour-adjustment (composition) — this stage concerns the preparation of a final product having the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties appropriate to ‘trójniak’, as specified in point 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’. In order to ensure that the required indicators are attained, it is possible to correct the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties by:

adding honey to sweeten the mead,

adding herbs and spices.

The aim of this stage is to obtain a product with the characteristic ‘trójniak’ bouquet.

Stage 8

Pouring into unit containers at a temperature of 55-60 °C. It is recommended that ‘trójniak’ be presented in traditional packaging, such as: carboys, ceramic containers or oak barrels.

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The specific character of ‘trójniak’ results from:

the preparation of the wort (composition and proportion of raw materials),

ageing and maturing,

its physico-chemical and organoleptic properties.

Preparation of the wort (composition and proportion of raw materials):

The specific character of ‘trójniak’ results in particular from the use of, and strict adherence to, the established proportions of honey and water — one part honey to two parts water — in the mead wort. This proportion is the determining factor in all further stages in the production of ‘trójniak’ that impart its unique properties.

Ageing and maturing:

According to the traditional old Polish recipe, the character of the product depends on its being aged and matured for a specified period of time. In the case of ‘trójniak’, this period is at least one year.

Physico-chemical and organoleptic properties:

Observance of all the stages of production included in the specification ensures that a product of unique taste and aroma is obtained. The unique taste and odour of ‘trójniak’ is the result of appropriate sugar and alcohol content:

reducing sugars after inversion: > 65-120 g/l,

total sugar, on the basis of the actual alcohol concentration (in % vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 323 g,

alcohol: 12-15 % vol.

Owing to strictly defined proportions of the ingredients used in its production, ‘trójniak’ possesses a typically viscous and runny consistency which distinguishes it from other types of mead.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

Traditional production method:

Mead production in Poland is a tradition which dates back over a thousand years and is characterised by great diversity. The development and improvement of the production method over the centuries has given rise to many types of mead. The history of mead production dates back to the beginnings of Poland’s statehood. In 966, the Spanish diplomat, merchant and traveller, Ibrahim ibn Yaqub, wrote: ‘Besides food, meat and land for ploughing, the country of Mieszko I abounds in mead, which is what the Slavic wines and intoxicating drinks are called’ (Mieszko I was the first historic king of Poland). The Chronicles of Gallus Anonymus, who recorded Polish history at the turn of the 11th and 12th centuries, also contain numerous references to the production of mead.

The Polish national epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’ by Adam Mickiewicz, which tells the story of the nobility between 1811 and 1812, contains a good deal of information on the production, consumption and types of mead. Mentions of mead can also be found in the poems of Tomasz Zan (1796-1855) and in Henryk Sienkiewicz’s trilogy describing events in Poland in the 17th century (‘Ogniem i mieczem’, published in 1884; ‘Potop’, published in 1886 and ‘Pan Wołodyjowski’, published in 1887 and 1888).

Source materials describing Polish culinary traditions of the 17th and 18th centuries contain not only general references to mead, but also references to different types of mead. Depending on the production method, they were called ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’. Each of these names relates to a different type of mead, produced on the basis of different proportions of honey and water or juice, and different ageing times. The ‘trójniak’ production technique has been used, with minor modifications, for centuries.

Traditional composition:

The traditional division of mead into ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’ has existed in Poland for centuries and still exists in consumers’ consciousness to this day. After the Second World War attempts were made to regulate the traditional division of mead into four categories. This division was finally enshrined in Polish law in 1948 by means of the Act on the production of wines, wine musts, meads and trade in such products (Journal of Laws of the Republic of Poland of 18 November 1948). This Act contains rules on the production of meads, specifying the proportions of honey and water and the technological requirements. The proportion of water and honey for ‘trójniak’ is given as follows: ‘Only mead produced from one part natural honey and two parts water may be called trójniak’.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character

Mandatory checking encompasses:

adherence to the established proportions of ingredients in the mead wort,

adherence to the length of the ageing time,

organoleptic properties of the finished product (taste, odour, colour, clarity),

physico-chemical indicators of the finished product: alcohol content, total sugar, reducing sugar after inversion, total acidity, volatile acidity, non-sugar extract, and ash in the case of fruit meads — the values should correspond to the values specified at point 3.5 of the specification.

Mandatory checks are carried out at least once a year.

It is recommended that checks also be carried out during the production stages listed below. Checks at the production stages listed below are not mandatory, but are advisable, because they help eliminate possible errors occurring at different stages of production:

Stage 4:

During the fermentation process, regular laboratory tests should be carried out on organoleptic properties (taste and odour) and physico-chemical parameters such as alcohol content and content of sugars that are subject to change during the alcoholic fermentation process.

Stage 6:

During ageing, regular checks should be carried out on the basic organoleptic properties of the product and physico-chemical indicators such as alcohol content, total sugar, total acidity and volatile acidity.

Stage 8:

Before bottling, checks are carried out on the various physico-chemical and organoleptic parameters specified at 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification:

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno — Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232900

Fax

+48 226232998

Email:

☒ Public

☐ Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The inspection authority above is responsible for the verification of the entirety of the specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘CZWÓRNIAK’

EC No: PL-TSG-007-0035-06.09.2006

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Krajowa Rada Winiarstwa i Miodosytnictwa przy Stowarzyszeniu Naukowo-Technicznym Inżynierów i Techników Przemysłu Spożywczego

Address:

ul. Czackiego 3/6

00-043 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228282721

E-mail:

krwim@sitspoz.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name to be registered

‘Czwórniak’

When the product is placed on the market, the label may contain the following information: ‘miód pitny wytworzony zgodnie ze staropolską tradycją’ (mead produced in accordance with an old Polish tradition). This information should be translated into other official languages.

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name ‘czwórniak’ derives from the numeral ‘four’ (PL: ‘cztery’) and relates directly to the historically established composition and method of production of ‘czwórniak’ — the proportions of honey and water in the mead wort being one part honey to three parts water. The name therefore expresses the specific character of the product. Since the term ‘czwórniak’ is a word that is used solely to denote a specific type of mead, the name should also be considered to be specific in itself.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.8. Other products of Annex I

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1. applies

‘Czwórniak’ is a mead, a clear beverage fermented from mead wort, distinguished by its characteristic honey aroma and the taste of the raw material used.

The flavour of ‘czwórniak’ may be enriched by the taste of spices that are used. The colour of ‘czwórniak’ ranges from golden to dark amber and depends on the type of honey used for production.

The physico-chemical indicators typical for ‘czwórniak’ mead are:

alcohol content: 9-12 % vol.,

reducing sugars after inversion: 35-90 g/l,

total acidity expressed as malic acid: 3,5-8 g/l,

volatile acidity expressed as acetic acid: max. 1,4 g/l,

total sugar (g) plus actual alcohol content (% vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 240,

non-sugar extract: not less than

15 g/l,

20 g/l in the case of fruit mead (melomel),

ash: min. 1,3 g/l — in the case of fruit mead.

The use of preservatives, stabilisers and artificial colourings and flavourings is prohibited in the production of ‘czwórniak’.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

Raw materials:

Natural honey with the following parameters:

water content: max. 20 % (m/m),

reducing sugar content: min. 70 % (m/m),

combined sucrose and melezitose content: max. 5 % (m/m),

total acidity — 1 mol/l NaOH solution per 100 g of honey: within the range 1-5 ml,

5-hydroxy-methyl-furfurol (HMF) content: max. 4,0 mg per 100 g honey.

High-attenuation mead yeast — suitable for attenuation of high extracts in pitched wort.

Herbs and spices: cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg or ginger.

Natural fruit juices or fresh fruit.

Production method

Stage 1

Brewing (boiling) of the mead wort at a temperature of 95-105 °C. The required proportions of honey and water for ‘czwórniak’ are one part honey to three parts water (or water mixed with fruit juice), to which herbs or spices may be added. In the case of fruit meads, at least 30 % of the water is replaced with fruit juice.

Strict adherence to the proportions of water and honey and obtaining the required extract in a wort kettle fitted with a steam jacket. This method of brewing prevents caramelisation of the sugars.

Stage 2

Cooling of the wort to 20-22 °C, the optimum temperature for yeast to propagate. The wort must be cooled on the day of production, and the cooling time depends on the efficiency of the cooler. Cooling guarantees the microbiological safety of the wort.

Stage 3

Pitching — addition of a yeast solution to the wort in a fermentation tank.

Stage 4

A.

Violent fermentation — 6-10 days. Keeping the temperature at a maximum level of 28 °C ensures that the fermentation process runs properly.

B.

Still fermentation — 3-6 weeks. The still fermentation period ensures that the proper physico-chemical parameters are attained.

Stage 5

Racking of the attenuated pitched wort

After obtaining an alcohol content of at least 9 % vol., racking prior to ageing should be carried out. This guarantees that the ‘czwórniak’ has the appropriate physico-chemical and organoleptic properties. Leaving the pitched wort on the lees beyond the still fermentation period adversely affects the organoleptic properties, owing to yeast autolysis.

Stage 6

Ageing (maturing) and siphoning (decanting) — this is repeated as necessary to prevent unwanted processes from taking place in the lees (yeast autolysis). During ageing it is possible to carry out operations such as pasteurisation and filtration.

This stage is essential for ensuring that the product has the right organoleptic properties.

The minimum ageing time for ‘czwórniak’ is nine months.

Stage 7

Flavour-adjustment (composition) — this stage concerns the preparation of a final product having the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties appropriate to ‘czwórniak’, as specified in point 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’. In order to ensure that the required parameters are attained, it is possible to correct the organoleptic and physico-chemical properties by:

adding honey to sweeten the mead,

adding herbs and spices.

The aim of this stage is to obtain a product with the characteristic ‘czwórniak’ bouquet.

Stage 8

Pouring into unit containers at a temperature of 55-60 °C. It is recommended that ‘czwórniak’ be presented in traditional packaging, such as: carboys, ceramic containers or oak barrels.

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The specific character of ‘czwórniak’ results from:

the preparation of the wort (composition and proportion of raw materials),

ageing and maturing,

its physico-chemical and organoleptic properties.

Preparation of the wort (composition and proportion of raw materials):

The specific character of ‘czwórniak’ results in particular from the use of, and strict adherence to, the established proportions of honey and water — one part honey to three parts water — in the mead wort. This proportion is the determining factor in all further stages in the production of ‘czwórniak’ that impart its unique properties.

Ageing and maturing:

According to the traditional old Polish recipe, the character of the product depends on its being aged and matured for a specified period of time. In the case of ‘czwórniak’ this period is at least nine months.

Physico-chemical and organoleptic properties:

Observance of all the stages of production included in the specification ensures that a product of unique taste and aroma is obtained. The unique taste and odour of ‘czwórniak’ is the result of appropriate sugar and alcohol content:

reducing sugars after inversion: > 35-90 g/l,

total sugar (g) plus actual alcohol content (% vol.) multiplied by 18: min. 240,

alcohol: 9-12 % vol.

Owing to strictly defined proportions of the ingredients used in its production, ‘czwórniak’ possesses a typically viscous and runny consistency which distinguishes it from other types of mead.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

Traditional production method:

Mead production in Poland is a tradition which dates back over a thousand years and is characterised by great diversity. The development and improvement of the production method over the centuries has given rise to many types of mead. The history of mead production dates back to the beginnings of Poland’s statehood. In 966, the Spanish diplomat, merchant and traveller, Ibrahim ibn Yaqub, wrote: ‘Besides food, meat and land for ploughing, the country of Mieszko I abounds in mead, which is what the Slavic wines and intoxicating drinks are called’ (Mieszko I was the first historic king of Poland). The Chronicles of Gallus Anonymus, who recorded Polish history at the turn of the 11th and 12th centuries, also contain numerous references to the production of mead.

The Polish national epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’ by Adam Mickiewicz, which tells the story of the nobility between 1811 and 1812, contains a good deal of information on the production, consumption and types of mead. Mentions of mead can also be found in the poems of Tomasz Zan (1796-1855) and in Henryk Sienkiewicz’s trilogy describing events in Poland in the 17th century (‘Ogniem i mieczem’, published in 1884; ‘Potop’, published in 1886 and ‘Pan Wołodyjowski’, published in 1887 and 1888).

Source materials describing Polish culinary traditions of the 17th and 18th centuries contain not only general references to mead, but also references to different types of mead. Depending on the production method, they were called ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’. Each of these names relates to a different type of mead, produced on the basis of different proportions of honey and water or juice, and different ageing times. The ‘czwórniak’ production technique has been used, with minor modifications, for centuries.

Traditional composition:

The traditional division of mead into ‘półtorak’, ‘dwójniak’, ‘trójniak’ and ‘czwórniak’ has existed in Poland for centuries and still exists in consumers’ consciousness to this day. After the Second World War attempts were made to regulate the traditional division of mead into four categories. This division was finally enshrined in Polish law in 1948 by means of the Act on the production of wines, wine musts, meads and trade in such products (Journal of Laws of the Republic of Poland of 18 November 1948). This Act contains rules on the production of meads, specifying the proportions of honey and water and the technological requirements. The proportion of water and honey for ‘czwórniak’ is given as follows: ‘Only mead produced from one part natural honey and three parts water may be called czwórniak’.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character

Mandatory checking encompasses:

adherence to the established proportions of ingredients in the mead wort,

adherence to the length of the ageing time,

organoleptic properties of the finished product (taste, odour, colour, clarity),

physico-chemical indicators of the finished product: alcohol content, total sugar, reducing sugar after inversion, total acidity, volatile acidity, non-sugar extract, and ash in the case of fruit meads — the values should correspond to the values specified at point 3.5 of the specification.

Mandatory checks are carried out at least once a year.

It is recommended that checks also be carried out during the production stages listed below. Checks at the production stages listed below are not mandatory, but are advisable, because they help eliminate possible errors occurring at different stages of production:

Stage 4:

During the fermentation process, regular laboratory tests should be carried out on organoleptic properties (taste and odour) and physico-chemical parameters such as alcohol content and content of sugars that are subject to change during the alcoholic fermentation process.

Stage 6:

During ageing, regular checks should be carried out on the basic organoleptic properties of the product and physico-chemical indicators such as alcohol content, total sugar, total acidity and volatile acidity.

Stage 8:

Before bottling, checks are carried out on the various physico-chemical and organoleptic parameters specified at 3.5 — ‘Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff’.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification:

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno — Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232900

Fax

+48 226232998

Email:

☒ Public Private

☐ Public Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The inspection authority above is responsible for the verification of the entirety of the specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘KIEŁBASA JAŁOWCOWA’

EC No: PL-TSG-007-0047-05.12.2006

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Związek ‘Polskie Mięso’

Address:

ul. Chałubińskiego 8

00-613 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228302657

Fax

+48 228301648

Email:

info@polskie-mieso.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Specificity of the product

3.1.   Name(s) to be registered (Article 2 of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ expresses the specific character of the product, which is linked above all to its exceptional taste and aroma. These features reflect the use in the production process of juniper berries, which are finely chopped just before they are added to the meat, and the use of juniper branches during the smoking process.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.2 — Meat products (cooked, salted, smoked, etc.)

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies (Article 3(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’ has the appearance of an evenly wrinkled stick in the form of a garland. It has a characteristic whorl shape, without external longitudinal creases. The garland of sausage exists in two sizes:

small, in natural casings over 32 mm in diameter and weighing 0,5 kg approx.,

large, in protein casings 36 mm in diameter and weighing 0,8 kg approx.

The colour of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ is dark brown, evenly spread over the entire surface, as is typical for heavily smoked sausages.

The consistency and ‘feel to the touch’ of the garland is that of a dry, smooth, evenly wrinkled surface, with a casing which fits tightly to the filling.

The product’s characteristic taste and tenderness result from the selection of raw materials, seasoning (in particular juniper) and the natural smoking which forms part of the production process.

Chemical composition

protein content — not less than 15,0 %,

water content — not more than 60,0 %,

fat content — not more than 35,0 %,

salt content — not more than 3,5 %,

nitrate (III) and nitrate (V) content expressed as NaNO2 — not more than 0,0125 %.

The above chemical composition values ensure the traditional quality of the product. The finished product yield in relation to the meat used as a raw material is 75 % (+/- 3 %).

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies (Article 3(2) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

Ingredients:

Meat (100 kg of raw material):

Class I pork with a fat content of up to 15 % — 20 kg,

Class IIA pork with a fat content of up to 20 % — 50 kg,

Class III pork with a fat content of up to 25 % — 20 kg,

cutting fat — 10 kg.

Up to 50 % of the Class IIA or Class III pork may be replaced by beef.

Seasonings (per 100 kg of meat):

natural pepper — 0,17 kg,

juniper — 0,12 kg,

sugar — 0,20 kg.

Other additives:

curing mix (based on a mixture of table salt (NaCl) and sodium nitrite (NaNO2)) — about 2 kg.

Feeding in the context of the production of pork intended for use in the making of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’:

Feeding refers to fatty-meat fattening. The aim is to produce pigs with a bodyweight of up to 120 kg, characterised by a higher intramuscular fat content (more than 3 %).

Fattening is based on late-maturing breeds, and an appropriate fattening regime makes it possible to achieve the desired intramuscular fat content. The breeds used for fattening do not carry the RN gene, and the RYR 1T gene is present in 20 % of the population.

Fattening should be carried out in three phases — phase I up to about 60 kg, phase II up to about 90 kg, and phase III up to 120 kg.

Fattening of animals up to 90 kg bodyweight approx. is carried out using two types of feed mixes. The feed mixes (doses) contain:

as energy components: cereal middlings — wheat, barley, rye, oat, triticale or maize; maize middlings and middlings of naked oat varieties account for up to 30 % of mixes,

as protein components: lupin, field bean and pea middlings, post-extraction soya meal, post-extraction rapeseed meal, rapeseed oilcake, fodder yeast or dried green fodder.

Feed mixes (doses) for animals from 90 to 120 kg contain:

as energy components: wheat, barley, rye and triticale middlings. Maize middlings and middlings of naked oat varieties may not be used in mixes (doses),

as protein components: middlings of leguminous crops (lupin, field bean and pea), post-extraction soya meal, rapeseed oilcake or post-extraction rapeseed meal and dried green fodder.

At no point in the feeding cycle may the following be used: vegetable oils, feed of animal origin, e.g. powdered milk, dried whey, fish meal.

The metabolic energy content in mixes in all phases of fattening is 12-13 MJ of ME/kg of mix. The protein content in mixes should be around 16-18 % in the first phase of fattening, 15-16 % in the second phase, and about 14 % in the final phase.

Doses for fatteners may be based on nutritive mixes alone, or nutritive mixes and bulk feed, i.e. potatoes and green fodder.

Stages in the production of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’:

Stage 1

Preliminary cutting up of all meat ingredients. Ensuring that the pieces of meat are of a uniform size (about 5 cm in diameter).

Stage 2

Traditional curing (dry method) for about 48 hours, using a curing mix.

Stage 3

Mechanical processing: Class I meat is ground to around 20 mm in size, Class IIA meat to around 8 mm in size, and Class III meat to around 3 mm, and is then minced together with 5 kg of ice.

Stage 4

Mixing of all meat ingredients and seasonings: natural pepper, sugar and juniper, which is ground just before it is added to the mixer.

Stage 5

Stuffing into natural pig intestines of over 32 mm in diameter or protein casings 36 mm in diameter, twisting-off of sticks and shaping in garlands. Two types of casing can be used to make the sausages:

smaller garlands in small pig intestines weighing 0,5 kg,

larger garlands in protein casings weighing 0,8 kg.

Stage 6

Settling at a temperature not exceeding 30 °C for two hours. Preliminary drying of the surface, ‘settling’ of the ingredients within the sticks.

Stage 7

Drying of the surface, followed by traditional hot smoking (for about 120 minutes) and baking until a temperature of at least 70 °C is reached inside the sticks.

Stage 8

Cooling for 24 hours.

Stage 9

Cold smoking using beech chips and juniper branches (for 120 minutes approx.), followed by drying at a temperature of 14-18 °C for 3-5 days until a yield of 75 % (+/- 3 %) is obtained.

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff (Article 3(3) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’ derives its specific character from several attributes that are typical of the product:

tenderness and specific properties of the meat;

exceptional taste and aroma;

uniform shape.

Tenderness, succulence and specific properties of the meat:

Pork from pigs of late-maturing breeds fattened to a bodyweight of about 120 kg and having the genetic traits described in point 3.6 is an essential ingredient of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ which influences the specific nature of the sausage. Compliance with these requirements yields an intramuscular fat content in excess of 3 %, ensuring that the meat possesses the appropriate gustatory and technological properties that are essential for the production of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’. The use of such raw materials and conformity to the traditional method of production, with special regard to the stages of mincing, curing and smoking, ensures that ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ is exceptionally tender and succulent.

Exceptional taste and aroma:

The specific character of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ is linked mainly to its unique taste and aroma, which are the result of the use of juniper berries in the production process. Grinding the juniper berries just before starting the production process enhances the sausage’s characteristic taste and contributes to its specific character, while the use of juniper in the smoking process adds to its taste and enhances its exceptional aroma.

Uniform shape:

Its shape is the feature which sets ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ apart from other sausages. The sausage is sold only in two, very similar shapes, which makes it easily recognisable for consumers. Kiełbasa jałowcowa has the appearance of an evenly wrinkled stick in the shape of a garland. It has a characteristic whorl shape, without external longitudinal creases.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff (Article 3(4) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

Traditional raw materials:

1.

Juniper

The 1903 Wielka Encyklopedia Powszechna Ilustrowana (Great Illustrated Universal Encyclopaedia) refers to one of the useful properties of this shrub, which has been fairly common in Poland for centuries, namely that juniper releases a pleasant aroma when burnt. The encyclopaedia also indicates that juniper branches, shavings and berries can be used in the smoking process to confer an exquisite taste and aroma on meat. Documents from the second half of the 19th century show that juniper was already used as a seasoning or ingredient of meat dishes and products. The Encyklopedyja Powszechna, published in Warsaw in 1863, states that juniper berries have a spicy, bittersweet taste and a pleasant aroma and are widely used as seasoning. A standard production method for the sausage using juniper grains and involving juniper-flavoured smoke was established in Poland as early as the end of the 1940s (see article in Gospodarka Mięsna, the meat industry’s publication (1954, issue 3) entitled ‘Regulacja asortymentów wędlin na zaopatrzenie rynku’).

2.

Pork

The meat of pigs kept for the production of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ must have an intramuscular fat content of more than 3 %; this is the marbling that confers on the product the desired tenderness, succulence and excellent taste. The use of such meat has a decisive influence on the quality of the final product and its specific character, and is in keeping with the traditional method of production.

Traditional method of production and composition:

Smoking is a way of preserving meat and the most widespread method of smoking was burning juniper. This is recorded in old Polish manuscripts, such as the notes of the anonymous steward of a country estate in the 1780s, which record recipes for processing meat (AGAD Warszawa, Zbiór z Muzeum Narodowego, ref. 1249). Poland’s national bard, Adam Mickiewicz, refers to the popularity of smoking meat with juniper in a description of breakfast at a country house in his 1834 epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’. ‘sliced tongue and ham — all quite tasty and home-made, smoked over juniper, fired in the chimney.’

The tradition of seasoning and smoking meat using juniper was cultivated in local and regional variants in which not just different technologies but also, sometimes, different types of meat were used. As W. Łęg states in the essay ‘Z doświadczeń przy produkcji wędlin’, Gospodarka Mięsna (1953, issue 6), experiments were carried out involving ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ made from game (hare or wild boar with the addition of pork). These sausages tasted different, but essentially the same recipe (interlarding and smoking with juniper) was used everywhere. A meat industry specialist travelling through the Kurpie region made the following notes, in a piece on regional processed-meat specialities published in Gospodarka Mięsna (1950, issue 7-8), on the local variant of kiełbasa jałowcowa: ‘Sausage from Myszyniec, Kurpie region, smoked on juniper and containing juniper grains. Dry, excellent characteristic aroma and taste.’

After 1945, in accordance with the doctrine of central planning, it was decided to build a meat industry based on large processing plants. Standardisation of products and technology based on traditional recipes was introduced with the aim of improving quality and taste. ‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’ as a product name appears in food trading standards in 1947 and 1948. A harmonised standard for ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ was established in 1954; it later developed into the Meat Industry Central Office’s 1964 standard (Wydawnictwo Przemysłu Lekkiego i Spożywczego, Warszawa 1964) on which the present application is based.

These standards were devised with the aim of ensuring the highest possible quality of kiełbasa jałowcowa. Although the standard on which this application is based is no longer binding, it still represents the highest production standards for ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character (Article 4 of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

With regard to the specific character of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’, the following in particular should be subjected to checks:

1.

Quality of raw materials used in production (pork, seasonings), including:

technological suitability of the meat,

type of fattening,

curing time,

seasonings used in the production of ‘kiełbasa jałowcowa’ and the proportions in which they are used.

2.

‘Kiełbasa jałowcowa’ smoking process

In the course of an inspection, the following must be checked:

maintenance of the temperature required for traditional smoking in hot smoke and the heating temperature,

maintenance of the duration and temperature of repeat smoking in cold smoke,

use of beech chips and juniper branches for cold smoking.

3.

Quality of the finished product:

protein content,

water content,

fat content,

sodium chloride content,

nitrate (III) and nitrate (V) content,

taste and aroma.

4.

Shape of the product.

Frequency of controls

Checks on the abovementioned stages must be carried out once every two months. If all these stages are proceeding correctly, the frequency of the checks may be reduced to two per year.

If irregularities occur at any stage, the frequency of checks on that stage must be increased (to once every two months). Checks on other stages may be carried out once every six months.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno-Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232901

Fax

+48 226232099

Email:

☒ Public

☐ Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The above inspection authority is responsible for checks on the entire specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘KIEŁBASA MYŚLIWSKA’

EC No: PL-TSG-0007-0053-19.03.2007

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Związek ‘Polskie Mięso’

Address:

ul. Chałubińskiego 8

00-613 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228302657

Fax

+48 228301648

E-mail:

info@polskie-mieso.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name(s) to be registered (Article 2 of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ expresses the specific character of the product. The product’s specific character as expressed in the name is reflected in its etymological derivation from the words ‘myśliwy’ (hunter) and ‘myślistwo’ (hunting), and indicates its original purpose: smoked-meat products of this type were originally used by hunters as dry provisions. Its good keeping qualities and its handiness have made it an ideal part of the provisions that people take with them on walks and journeys and for longer stays in places where hot meals are hard to come by. Only with time has this product become more widely marketed, but its name has not changed.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.2 — Meat products (cooked, salted, smoked, etc.)

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies (Article 3(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’ sausage is short, dark brown in colour and has an evenly wrinkled surface (free of lengthwise depressions). Its appearance is that of sticks bent into a crescent shape, usually divided into ‘pairs’ (unseparated at the twist-off point), of around 15 cm in length and over 32 mm in diameter.

The surface of ‘kielbasa myśliwska’ is dark brown in colour. Dark-red pieces of Class I pork and pale-red pieces of Class II pork can be seen in cross-section.

The ‘feel to the touch’ is that of a smooth, dry and evenly wrinkled surface.

‘Kielbasa myśliwska’ is characterised by the taste of tenderised, cured, baked and smoked pork, with seasonings added.

Apart from its specific taste, the sausage is distinguished by its tenderness.

Chemical composition:

protein content — not less than 17,0 %,

water content — not more than 55,0 %,

fat content — not more than 45,0 %,

salt content — not more than 4,5 %,

nitrate (III) and nitrate (V) content expressed as NaNO2 — not more than 0,0125 %.

The above chemical composition values ensure the traditional quality of the product. The finished product yield relative to the meat used as a raw material must be less than 68 %.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies (Article 3(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

Ingredients:

Meat (100 kg of raw material):

Class I pork with a fat content of up to 15 % — 30 kg,

Class IIA pork with a fat content of up to 20 % — 50 kg,

Class III pork with a fat content of up to 25 % — 20 kg.

Up to 50 % of the Class IIA pork or Class III pork may be replaced by beef.

Seasonings (per 100 kg of meat):

natural pepper — 0,15 kg,

juniper — 0,10 kg,

fresh garlic — 0,10 kg,

sugar — 0,20 kg.

Other additives:

curing mix (on the basis of a mixture of table salt (NaCl) and sodium nitrite (NaNO2)) — about 2 kg,

tenderising mix (with the following composition: 1 litre of 10 % table vinegar, 1 litre of water, 1 litre of rapeseed or sunflower oil) — 3 litres.

Feeding in the context of the production of pork intended for use in the making of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’:

Feeding refers to fatty-meat fattening. The aim is to produce pigs with a bodyweight of up to 120 kg, characterised by a higher intramuscular fat content (more than 3 %).

Fattening is based on late-maturing breeds, and an appropriate fattening regime makes it possible to achieve the desired intramuscular fat content. The breeds used for fattening do not carry the RN gene, and the RYR 1T gene is present in 20 % of the population.

Fattening should be carried out in three phases — phase I up to about 60 kg, phase II up to about 90 kg, and phase III up to about 120 kg.

Fattening of animals up to 90 kg bodyweight is carried out using two types of feed mixes. The feed mixes (doses) contain:

as energy components: cereal middlings — wheat, barley, rye, oat, triticale or maize; maize middlings and middlings from naked oat varieties may account for up to 30 % of the mix,

as protein components: lupin, field bean and pea middlings, post-extraction soya meal, post-extraction rapeseed meal, rapeseed oil cake, fodder yeast or dried green fodder.

Feed mixes (doses) for animals from 90 to 120 kg contain:

as energy components: wheat, barley, rye and triticale middlings. Maize middlings and middlings of naked oat varieties may not be used in mixes (doses).

as protein components: middlings of leguminous crops (lupin, field bean and pea), post-extraction soya meal, rapeseed oilcake or post-extraction rapeseed meal and dried green fodder.

At no point in the feeding cycle may the following be used: vegetable oils, feed of animal origin, e.g. powdered milk, dried whey, fish meal.

The metabolic energy content in mixes in all phases of fattening is 12-13 MJ of ME/kg of mix. The protein content in mixes should be around 16-18 % in the first phase of fattening, 15-16 % in the second phase, and about 14 % in the final phase.

Doses for fatteners may be based on nutritive mixes alone, or nutritive mixes and bulk feed, i.e. potatoes and green fodder.

Stages in the production of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’:

Stage 1

Preliminary cutting up of all meat ingredients. Ensuring that the pieces of meat are of a uniform size (up to about 5 cm in diameter).

Stage 2

Traditional curing (dry method) for about 48 hours, using a curing mix.

Stage 3

Mechanical processing: Class I meat is reduced to around 20 mm in size, Class IIA meat to around 8 mm in size, and Class III meat to around 3 mm, and is then minced together with 2 kg of ice.

Stage 4

Addition of tenderising mix to Class I and Class IIA meat — thorough blending.

Stage 5

Addition of minced Class III pork and seasonings — thorough blending.

Stage 6

Stuffing into natural pig intestines of over 32 mm in diameter and twisting-off of sticks of about 15 cm in length.

Stage 7

Settling at a temperature not exceeding 30 °C for two hours. Preliminary drying of the surface, ‘settling’ of the ingredients within the sticks.

Stage 8

Drying of the surface and traditional smoking in hot smoke (for about 135 minutes) and baking until a temperature of at least 70 °C is reached inside the sticks.

Stage 9

Chilling and refrigeration to below 10 °C.

Stage 10

Drying at 14-18 °C and 70-80 % humidity for 5-7 days until the desired yield is obtained (not exceeding 68 %).

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff (Article 3(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

The specific character of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ derives from several attributes that are typical of the product:

tenderness, succulence and specific properties of the meat,

exceptional taste and aroma,

short, characteristic shape,

exceptionally long shelf-life.

Tenderness, succulence and specific properties of the meat:

Pork from pigs of late-maturing breeds fattened to a bodyweight of about 120 kg and having the genetic traits described in point 3.6 is an essential ingredient of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ which influences the specific nature of the sausage. Compliance with these requirements yields an intramuscular fat content in excess of 3 %, ensuring that the meat possesses the appropriate gustatory and technological properties that are essential for the production of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’. The use of such raw materials and conformity to the traditional method of production, with special regard to the stages of mincing, curing and smoking, ensures that ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ is exceptionally tender and succulent.

The addition to the pork of a specially selected tenderising mix composed of vinegar, water and rapeseed or sunflower oil is what makes the meat used in the production of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ so tender.

Exceptional taste and aroma:

Its taste and aroma are the features which set ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ apart from other sausages. These features are the result of the use in the production process of appropriately selected seasonings and the proportions thereof, namely juniper, natural pepper, sugar and the curing mix, as well as the fresh garlic typical of this product and the tenderising mix.

The exceptional taste and aroma is also achieved by means of smoking and drying and thanks to the prolonged period of drying that is typical of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’.

Short, characteristic shape:

The specific character of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ is linked mainly to its unique shape. ‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’ is short and has the appearance of evenly wrinkled sticks bent into a crescent shape and usually divided into ‘pairs’ (unseparated at the twist-off point).

The main attribute and trait of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ is its exceptional ‘handiness’. Its shape is recognisable, and the product is exceptionally ‘handy’ and is consumed in particular on different kinds of outings and journeys.

Exceptionally long shelf-life:

The exceptionally long shelf-life of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’, which is used mainly to supplement hunters’ or tourists’ provisions, is also one of its essential features and is achieved thanks to the traditional use of fresh garlic and the prolonged period of after-drying during the final stage of production.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff (Article 3(4) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

Traditional raw materials and composition:

1.

Pork from traditionally fed pigs

The meat of pigs kept for the production of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ must have an intramuscular fat content of more than 3 %; this is the marbling that confers on the product the desired tenderness, succulence and excellent taste. The use of such meat has a decisive influence on the quality of the final product and its specific character, and is in keeping with the traditional method of production.

2.

Appropriately selected seasonings

The use in the production process of appropriately selected seasonings and the proportions thereof, namely natural pepper, juniper, sugar and the curing mix, and in particular fresh garlic and the tenderising mix, stems directly from the experience and long tradition of producing meat products in Poland.

Traditional method of production:

Hunting had been governed by its own set of rules and customs for centuries. Descriptions of the chase are found in Polish literature, including the national epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’ by Adam Mickiewicz, dating from 1834. It constituted an almost social celebration, replete with rituals and symbolism — such as the hunting signals blown on the horn, the huntsman’s initiation or ‘christening’ and the end-of-hunt feasts. Hunting associations established since have adopted these traditions and cultivate them to this day.

The hunter’s bag has been an indispensable and customary element of hunting gear. It contained, amongst other things, dry provisions suitable for all-day walks around the forest. Descriptions of meals taken in the course of a hunt are found in literature, including the abovementioned ‘Pan Tadeusz’. Dried and smoked, hence relatively durable, sausage has always been part of the provisions eaten at rest stops.

The name ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ most likely appeared in the inter-war years of the twentieth century, when the production of smoked meat products developed in numerous small processing plants in Poland, as reported in the periodical Gospodarka Mięsna No 1-2 of 1949.

‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’ met with great commercial success in Poland after the Second World War. Pursuant to Order No 485 of the Minister for the Meat and Dairy Industry of 3 November 1953, ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ was included on the official list of smoked-meat products destined for the market and subsequently, for quality reasons, recipes and technological documentation were standardised in accordance with standard RN-54/MPMiMl-Mięs-58 of 30 December 1954 and pursuant to Internal Regulation No 21 of the Meat Industry Central Office, issued in Warsaw in 1964. To this day, ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ remains one of the most popular and keenly consumed smoked-meat products.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character (Article 4 of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

With regard to the specific character of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’, the following in particular should be subjected to checks:

1.

Quality of raw materials used in production (pork, seasonings), including:

technological suitability of the meat,

type of fattening,

curing time,

seasonings used in the production of ‘kiełbasa myśliwska’ and the proportions in which they are used.

2.

‘Kiełbasa myśliwska’ smoking process

In the course of an inspection, the following must be checked:

maintenance of the temperature required for traditional smoking in hot smoke and the heating temperature,

maintenance of the duration and temperature of repeat smoking in cold smoke,

use of beech chips for smoking in cold smoke.

3.

Quality of the finished product:

protein content,

water content,

fat content,

sodium chloride content,

nitrate (III) and nitrate (V) content,

taste and aroma.

4.

Shape of the product.

Frequency of checks:

Checks on the abovementioned stages must be carried out once every two months. If all these stages are functioning correctly, the frequency of the checks may be reduced to two per year.

If irregularities occur at any stage, the frequency of checks on that stage must be increased (to once every two months). Checks on other stages may continue to be carried out once every six months.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno-Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232901

Fax

+48 226232099

Email:

☒ Public

☐ Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The above inspection authority is responsible for checks on the entire specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘OLEJ RYDZOWY’

EC No: PL-STG-007-0049-28.12.2006

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name of group or organisation:

‘SemCo’ S.G.N.i P. Krystyna Just,

Instytut Włókien Naturalnych — Tłocznia Oleju,

Krzysztof Gałkowski -Zakład Wytłaczania Oleju i Wyrób Kitu,

Zakład Doświadczalno-Dydaktyczny Uprawy Roli i Roślin, Gorzyń

Address:

Śmiłowo 16

64-500 Szamotuły

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 612920402; +48 603137517

E-mail:

info@semco.pl

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name to be registered

‘Olej rydzowy’

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

‘Olej rydzowy’ is produced from the plant Camelina sativa, i.e. gold-of-pleasure or false flax, known as lnianka siewna in Polish but popularly called rydz, rydzyk, ryżyk, or, more seldom, lennica.

Some regions of Poland only use the popular name of this plant, i.e. rydz, which is due to its exceptionally rusty-coloured seeds. The colour is similar to that of the mushroom Lactarius deliciosus (Saffron milk cap), called rydz in Polish and found all over the country. It is precisely because of the rusty colour of the gold-of-pleasure seeds that we call the oil made from them ‘olej rydzowy’.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.5 — Oils and fats (butter, margarine, oil, etc.).

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

‘Olej rydzowy’ has the appearance of a clear, transparent, oily liquid with a small quantity of sediment at the bottom and a rusty colour. Depending on whether the spring or winter variety of the plant is used (Camelina sativa, Camelina silvestris) the colour of the oil varies from golden to reddish-brown. The colour is also influenced by the temperature at which the seeds are heated. ‘Olej rydzowy’ has a characteristic taste of onions and mustard and a strong and rich aroma.

‘Olej rydzowy’ has the following physico-chemical properties:

Acid value — Not more than 6 mg KOH/g

Peroxide value, mval active oxygen per kg — not more than 6

Iodine value: 140-160

Freezing temperature: between - 15 °C and - 18 °C

‘Olej rydzowy’ can be stored for a long time, unlike oils of similar composition and proportion of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. This is due to the high content of natural antioxidants of the tocopherol group (vitamin E), approx. 550-1 100 mg/kg of oil.

The content of saturated acids is low, 10-11 %, while unsaturated acids constitute approx. 90 %, of which monounsaturated 36 % and polyunsaturated between 50 % and 60 %.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies

Step 1

Obtaining the seeds:

The seeds are obtained from the cultivation of spring or winter gold-of-pleasure. Depending on the species, the plant is sown in autumn or in spring.

The plants are harvested once only, when the seeds have matured.

Step 2

Drying and cleaning the seeds:

The seeds are dried within 6 hours after harvesting. They must be dried until the humidity reaches a level of 7-12 %.

This step is followed by cleaning the seeds to above 98 %.

Step 3

Preparing the pressing:

The first preparatory step is flaking (crushing) the seeds with a smooth roller.

Step 4

Conditioning the seeds:

The flaked seeds are heated to 38 °C in a kettle with either a water jacket or heated tin sheets.

Step 5

Pressing:

In order to obtain oil of the desired physico-chemical properties, the pressing must take place only in presses which do not increase the temperature of the crushed seeds above the limit of 38 °C.

Step 6

Cleaning the oil:

The oil is cleaned by sedimentation, i.e. a process consisting in allowing the heavier fusel oils to fall to the bottom of the container at a room temperature during 7-10 days, after which time the top layer of the oil is suitable for consumption.

The oil is not refined in any way.

Step 7

Storing the oil:

The oil is stored in dry places which are not exposed to sunlight at a maximum temperature of 20 °C and a minimum of 4 °C. Correct storage has an influence on the quality of the oil.

Forbidden practices:

In order to maintain the specific character of ‘olej rydzowy’, the following are not allowed during production:

heating the seeds to a temperature exceeding 38 °C,

using oil presses that significantly increase the temperature of the pulp above the fixed temperature of 38 °C,

increasing the pressure during oil pressing above 300 A.

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The specific character of ‘olej rydzowy’ is due to its basic features, namely:

exceptional taste and smell,

colour,

physico-chemical composition,

possibility of long storage.

Taste and smell:

The oil differs from other products of this type by its specific taste with a distinct hint of onion and mustard, as well as a pleasant, moderately strong pure aroma.

Colour:

Gold-of-pleasure oil has a rusty colour.

Physico-chemical composition:

‘Olej rydzowy’ is very specific mainly due to its nutritional value and its rich chemical composition. It contains a number of components sought after in dietetics, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA).

The content of these acids in ‘olej rydzowy’ is between 50 % and 60 %, with Omega-3 acids between 35 % and 40 % and Omega-6 between 15 % and 20 %. These features make ‘olej rydzowy’ one of the richest plant sources of Omega-3 acids known to man.

Possibility of long storage:

In spite of its high acid content, ‘olej rydzowy’ is durable and fit for consumption for six months after the production date, if the recommendations for storage are respected. The long shelf life is possible because of the antioxidants of the tocopherol group (vitamin E), approx. 550-1 100 mg/kg of oil) which the oil contains. This is yet another feature that confirms the particular character of this product.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

Traditional raw material:

The basic material for the production of ‘olej rydzowy’ is gold-of-pleasure (or false flax), a plant belonging to the Cruciferae family and of the genus Camelina, which includes a number of species. Two species of gold-of-pleasure are used for the production of oil: the spring species (Camelina sativa) and the winter one (Camelina silvestris). Gold-of-pleasure is 30-100 cm tall and has an inflorescence in the shape of an elongated yellow-white bunch. The fruit of gold-of-pleasure is a pear-shaped silique (3-7 mm), which soon becomes woody and hard and contains about 10 rust-coloured or rusty-yellow seeds, about 0,6 to 2,6 mm long. The plant can be grown on lighter and sandy soils.

The plant originates in the Middle East. According to research into the history of the cultivation of the plant and the pressing of oil from it, its seeds were found on Polish territory at excavations in Strzegom Śląski dating from the Bronze Age, i.e. 3 000 years ago (this information is confirmed in an article from 1966 by Professor F. Dembiński entitled ‘Rośliny oleiste’ (‘Oil plants’). In his works on the gold-of-pleasure plant, the botanist Professor Marian Nowiński has highlighted the discovery of its seeds at archaeological sites that reveal the activities of Proto-Slavic peoples of the Lusatian Culture, as well as in the area of Biskupin, a settlement from the eighth century B.C. and the most famous archaeological reserve in Central Europe.

The large number of Polish popular names for this plant, namely: rydz, rydzyk, ryżyk, lennica, is further testimony to the fact that gold-of-pleasure seeds have been used for many centuries (cf. Szczegółowa uprawa roślin (‘Plant cultivation in detail’); a collective work from 1956 edited by Professor Anatol Listkowski).

According to the popular saying ‘lepszy rydz niż nic’ (‘better something than nothing’) which is often repeated until this day, it is better to have at least this ubiquitous ‘rydz’, i.e. gold-of-pleasure, than to be left empty-handed. This saying, too, confirms the enormous popularity of this plant in the community.

The popularity of this plant is also due to its modest requirements as to the soil, and its short vegetation period of 70 to 100 days.

According to Professor Tadeusz Zając, until the nineteenth century the cultivation of gold-of-pleasure dominated on worse soils, where it was a very popular oil plant, and its seeds were used for ‘olej rydzowy’ (article in the review Magazyn Farmerski, July 2006).

The prevalence of gold-of-pleasure allows us to assume that oil pressing was known since time immemorial to Slavic tribes living on current Polish territory. For centuries, ‘olej rydzowy’ was consumed by the community although its chemical composition was not known.

Traditional method:

The tradition of pressing oil from gold-of-pleasure seeds goes back a very long time. Archaeological discoveries have shown that the inhabitants of the site of Biskupin were familiar with the process of pressing oil from gold-of-pleasure seeds. Besides gold-of-pleasure seeds, archaeologists at the site have also found the remains of appliances for pressing oil. Other archaeological discoveries confirm that oil from gold-of-pleasure seeds was also pressed after the end of Lusatian Culture, as Slavic tribes were settling in Polish territory.

In his book Olejarnia dworska z XVII wieku (‘Manor oil mills in the seventeenth century’), H. Samsonowicz describes in detail manor and peasant oil mills from that time and the machines used for pressing oil at the time, such as wedge presses, as well as the method used to drive in the wedges. The book also mentions the fact that oil from gold-of-pleasure seeds was popular among the Polish landed nobility. Yet another confirmation of this information is the exhibition at the Agricultural Museum in Szreniawa of machines and appliances used for oil pressing at Polish manors.

H. Olszański writes in his book Tradycyjne olejarstwo w Polsce (‘Traditional oil-milling in Poland’) that, as technological thinking progressed in the nineteenth century, traditional appliances for oil milling such as querns, mortars or wedge presses were replaced by heating systems with stirrers, appliances with several rollers for flaking the seeds and lever presses, and later hydraulic presses driven by thread-mills, then by steam engines, motor engines and more recently by electric engines. Machines of this type are used until now, while the basic way of obtaining oil, i.e. not increasing the temperature of the crushed seeds beyond 38 °C, has not been changed.

This feature confirms the traditional character of ‘olej rydzowy’, not only because of the unchanged production process, but also since it testifies of how excellent this process is.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures for checking the specific character

With regard to the specific character of ‘olej rydzowy’, the following should be particularly checked:

The quality of the raw material used for production, i.e.:

checking how clean the seeds are, and

checking the process of crushing, heating and pressing the seeds.

The quality of the finished product, i.e.:

the characteristic taste of onion and mustard,

the pleasant, pure aroma,

the clarity of the liquid, coloured golden to brownish, with a small amount of sediment at the bottom.

Checks will be carried out at least once every year.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno-Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232901

Fax

+48 226232099

Email:

☒ Public authority

☐ Public agency

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The above inspection authority is responsible for verifying the entire specification.

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF A TSG

COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 509/2006

‘KABANOSY’

EC No: PL-TSG-0007-0050-22.01.2007

1.   Name and address of the applicant group

Name:

Związek ‘Polskie Mięso’

Address:

ul. Chałubińskiego 8

00-613 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 228302657

Fax

+48 228301648

Email:

info@polskie-mieso.pl.

2.   Member State or Third Country

Poland

3.   Product specification

3.1.   Name(s) to be registered (Article 2 of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kabanosy’

The indication ‘Produced following the Polish tradition’ translated into the language of the country where marketed shall appear on the labelling.

3.2.   Whether the name

is specific in itself

expresses the specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff

The name expresses the specific character of the product. In 19th century Poland and Lithuania the term ‘kaban’, or the diminutive form ‘kabanek’, referred to extensively reared young hogs which used to be fattened mainly with potatoes, and the meat they produced was customarily called ‘kabanina’. ‘Kabanos’ is derived from the name used to designate these hogs.

3.3.   Whether reservation of the name is sought under Article 13(2) of Regulation (EC) No 509/2006

Registration with reservation of the name

Registration without reservation of the name

3.4.   Type of product

Class 1.2 — Meat products (cooked, salted, smoked, etc.)

3.5.   Description of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies (Article 3(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

‘Kabanosy’ are long, thin sticks of dry sausage twisted off at one end and evenly wrinkled. The sticks are folded in two and in the curve there is an indent where they were hung.

The surface of the ‘kabanosy’ is dark red in colour with a cherry tint. A cross-section reveals dark red pieces of meat and cream-coloured fat.

The ‘feel to the touch’ is that of a smooth, dry and evenly wrinkled surface.

‘Kabanosy’ have a strong taste of cured, baked pork and a delicate, smoky aftertaste redolent of caraway and pepper.

Chemical composition:

protein content — not less than 15,0 %,

water content — not more than 60,0 %,

fat content — not more than 35,0 %,

salt content — not more than 3,5 %,

nitrate (III) and nitrate (V) content expressed as NaNO2 — not more than 0,0125 %.

The above chemical composition values ensure the traditional quality of the product. The finished product yield in relation to the meat used as a raw material must be less than 68 %.

3.6.   Description of the production method of the agricultural product or foodstuff to which the name under point 3.1 applies (Article 3(2) of Commission Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

Ingredients:

Meat (100 kg of raw material):

Class I pork with a fat content of up to 15 % — 30 kg,

Class IIA pork with a fat content of up to 20 % — 40 kg,

Class IIB pork with a fat content of up to 40 % — 30 kg.

Seasonings (per 100 kg of meat)

natural pepper — 0,15 kg,

nutmeg — 0,05 kg,

caraway — 0,07 kg,

sugar — 0,2 kg.

Other additives:

curing mix (based on a mixture of table salt (NaCl) and sodium nitrite (NaNO2)) — about 2 kg.

Feeding in the context of the production of pork intended for use in the making of ‘kabanosy’:

Feeding refers to fatty-meat fattening. The aim is to produce pigs with a bodyweight of up to 120 kg, characterised by a higher intramuscular fat content (more than 3 %).

Fattening is based on late-maturing breeds, and an appropriate fattening regime makes it possible to achieve the desired intramuscular fat content. The breeds used for fattening do not carry the RN gene, and the RYR 1T gene is present in 20 % of the population.

Fattening should be carried out in three phases — phase I up to about 60 kg, phase II up to about 90 kg, and phase III up to 120 kg.

Fattening of animals up to 90 kg bodyweight is carried out using two types of feed mixes. The feed mixes (doses) contain:

as energy components: cereal middlings — wheat, barley, rye, oat, triticale or maize; maize middlings and middlings of naked oat varieties account for up to 30 % of mixes,

as protein components: — lupin, field bean and pea middlings, post-extraction soya meal, post-extraction rapeseed meal, rapeseed oil cake, fodder yeast or dried green fodder.

Feed mixes (doses) for animals from 90 to 120 kg contain:

as energy components: wheat, barley, rye and triticale middlings. Maize middlings and middlings of naked oat varieties may not be used in mixes (doses),

as protein components: middlings of leguminous crops (lupin, field bean and pea), post-extraction soya meal, rapeseed oilcake or post-extraction rapeseed meal and dried green fodder.

At no point in the feeding cycle may the following be used: vegetable oils, feed of animal origin, e.g. powdered milk, dried whey, fish meal.

The metabolic energy content in mixes in all phases of fattening is 12-13 MJ of ME/kg of mix. The protein content in mixes should be around 16-18 % in the first phase of fattening, 15-16 % in the second phase, and about 14 % in the final phase.

Doses for fatteners may be based on nutritive mixes alone, or nutritive mixes and bulk feed, i.e. potatoes and green fodder.

Stages in the production of ‘kabanosy’:

Stage 1

Preliminary cutting up of all meat ingredients. Ensuring that the pieces of meat are of a uniform size (about 5 cm in diameter).

Stage 2

Traditional curing (dry method) for about 48 hours, using a curing mix.

Stage 3

Class I meat is reduced to around 10 mm in size, Class IIA and Class IIB meat to around 8 mm in size.

Stage 4

Mixing of all meat ingredients and seasonings: natural pepper, nutmeg, caraway and sugar.

Stage 5

Stuffing into thin sheep casings of between 20 and 22 mm in diameter and twisting-off at one end of sticks of about 25 cm in length.

Stage 6

Settling at a temperature not exceeding 30 °C for two hours. Preliminary drying of the surface, ‘settling’ of the ingredients within the sticks.

Stage 7

Drying of the surface and traditional smoking in hot smoke (for about 150 minutes) and baking until a temperature of at least 70 °C is reached inside the sticks.

Stage 8

Smoking is stopped and the ‘kabanosy’ are left in the smoke room for about one hour, after which they are chilled and refrigerated to below 10 °C.

Stage 9

Drying at 14-18 °C and 80 % humidity for 3-5 days until the desired yield is obtained (not exceeding 68 %).

3.7.   Specific character of the agricultural product or foodstuff (Article 3(3) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

The specific character of ‘kabanosy’ derives from several attributes that are typical of the product:

tenderness, succulence and specific properties of the meat,

exceptional taste and aroma,

uniform, characteristic shape.

Tenderness, succulence and specific properties of the meat:

Pork from pigs of late-maturing breeds fattened to a bodyweight of about 120 kg and having the genetic traits described in point 3.6 is an essential ingredient of ‘kabanosy’ which influences the specific nature of the sausage. Compliance with these requirements yields an intramuscular fat content in excess of 3 %, ensuring that the meat possesses the appropriate gustatory and technological properties that are essential for the production of ‘kabanosy’. The use of such raw materials and conformity to the traditional method of production, with special regard to the stages of mincing, curing and smoking, ensures that ‘kabanosy’ are exceptionally tender and succulent. Another characteristic of ‘kabanosy’ is the clearly audible noise they make when they are broken in two. This is the result of the meat’s tenderness and the way in which ‘kabanosy’ are prepared, in particular, drying and smoking.

Exceptional taste and aroma:

Their taste and aroma are the features which set ‘kabanosy’ apart from other sausages. These features are the result of the use in the production process of appropriately selected seasonings and the proportions thereof: natural pepper, nutmeg, caraway, sugar and the specific smoking process, which further enhances the product’s flavour.

Uniform, characteristic shape:

The specific character of ‘kabanosy’ is linked mainly to their unique shape. ‘Kabanosy’ are long, thin sticks of dry sausage twisted off at one end and evenly wrinkled.

3.8.   Traditional character of the agricultural product or foodstuff (Article 3(4) of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

Traditional method of production and storage:

Kabanosy, or thin, dried and smoked pork sausages in sheep casings, were eaten throughout Poland as early as the 1920s and 1930s. They were produced in small, local butchers’ establishments under the same name, but in different regional varieties. The main differences concerned the seasonings used, but also the quality of the sausages themselves. The cookery books and food publications of the day, like M. Karczewska’s ‘Wyrób wędlin i innych przetworów mięsnych sposobem domowym’, published in Warsaw in 1937, provided recipes and helped to standardise production techniques for ‘kabanosy’, enabling brand consolidation and quality improvements. These sausages tasted good and preservation techniques like smoking and drying meant that they could be kept for long periods.

After 1945 standardisation was introduced in an attempt to improve product quality. ‘Kabanosy’ were officially released for consumption by the Decree of the Ministers for Provisions, Industry and Commerce of 15 September 1948 (Journal of Laws 1948/44, item 334). Technological and production aspects were subsequently standardised (Standard No RN-54/MPMIM1-Mięs-56 of 30 December 1954), and in 1964 the Polish Meat Industry Headquarters in Warsaw issued a standard recipe for ‘Kabanosy’ based on traditional production methods (Internal Regulations No 21).

‘Kabanosy’ were extremely popular during Communist times (1945-1989); everybody used to buy them. They graced elegant tables on special occasions and were equally suitable as picnic food for travellers, as gifts or as a snack with vodka. Together with ham and bacon, they also became a Polish export speciality.

Traditional ingredient — pork:

‘Kabanosy’ are made from specially fattened hogs which used to be known as ‘kabany’. The term ‘kaban’ features in the 1834 epic poem ‘Pan Tadeusz’ by Poland’s national bard Adam Mickiewicz. Originally used to refer to wild boars, hogs and even horses, by the 19th century, according to the 1863 Encyklopedyja Powszechna, Volume 13, the term was universally used to designate a well-fed, fat young hog. The hogs were specially fattened up to obtain delicate, exquisite meat with a high intramuscular fat content which gave the products made from it a strong, specific taste, tenderness and succulence. The term ‘kabanina’, derived from ‘kaban’, was also widely used. According to the definition in the Polish dictionary published in Vilnius in 1861, it usually referred to pork.

The meat of pigs kept for the production of ‘kabanosy’ must have an intramuscular fat content of more than 3 %; this is the marbling that confers on the product the desired tenderness, succulence and excellent taste. The use of such meat has a decisive influence on the quality of the final product and its specific character, and is in keeping with the traditional method of production.

3.9.   Minimum requirements and procedures to check the specific character (Article 4 of Regulation (EC) No 1216/2007)

With regard to the specific character of ‘kabanosy’, the following in particular should be subjected to checks:

(1)

Quality of raw materials used in production (pork, seasonings), including:

technological suitability of the meat,

type of fattening,

curing time,

seasonings used in the production of ‘kabanosy’ and the proportions in which they are used.

(2)

‘Kabanosy’ smoking process

In the course of an inspection, the following must be checked:

maintenance of the temperature required for traditional smoking in hot smoke and the heating temperature,

maintenance of the duration and temperature of repeat smoking in cold smoke,

use of beech chips for smoking in cold smoke.

(3)

Quality of the finished product:

protein content,

water content,

fat content,

sodium chloride content,

nitrate (III) and nitrate (V) content,

taste and aroma.

(4)

Shape of the product:

Frequency of checks

Checks on the abovementioned stages must be carried out once every two months. If all these stages are proceeding correctly, the frequency of the checks may be reduced to two per year.

If irregularities occur at any stage, the frequency of checks on that stage must be increased (to once every two months). Checks on other stages may be carried out once every six months.

4.   Authorities or bodies verifying compliance with the product specification

4.1.   Name and address

Name:

Główny Inspektorat Jakości Handlowej Artykułów Rolno-Spożywczych

Address:

ul. Wspólna 30

00-930 Warszawa

POLSKA/POLAND

Tel.

+48 226232901

Fax

+48 226232099

E-mail:

☒ Public

☐ Private

4.2.   Specific tasks of the authority or body

The above inspection authority is responsible for checks on the entire specification.


(1)  Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 November 2012 on quality schemes for agricultural products and foodstuffs (OJ L 343, 14.12.2012, p. 1).

(2)  EU No PL-TSG-0107-01407 — 22.12.2015.

(3)  Commission Regulation (EC) No 729/2008 of 28 July 2008 entering certain designations in the register of the traditional specialities guaranteed (Czwórniak (TSG), Dwójniak (TSG), Półtorak (TSG), Trójniak (TSG)) (OJ L 200, 29.7.2008, p. 6).

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 379/2011 of 18 April 2011 entering a name in the register of the traditional specialities guaranteed (Kiełbasa jałowcowa (TSG)) (OJ L 103, 19.4.2011, p. 2).

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 382/2011 of 18 April 2011 entering a name in the register of the traditional specialities guaranteed (Kiełbasa myśliwska (TSG)) (OJ L 103, 19.4.2011, p. 6).

Commission Regulation (EC) No 506/2009 of 15 June 2009 entering a designation in the register of the traditional specialities guaranteed (Olej rydzowy (TSG)) (OJ L 151, 16.6.2009, p. 26).

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 1044/2011 of 19 October 2011 entering a name in the register of the traditional specialities guaranteed (Kabanosy (TSG)) (OJ L 275, 20.10.2011, p. 16).

(4)  Council Regulation (EC) No 509/2006 of 20 March 2006 on agricultural products and foodstuffs as traditional specialities guaranteed (OJ L 93, 31.3.2006, p. 1). Regulation repealed and replaced by Regulation (EU) No 1151/2012.

(5)  Półtorak, EC No PL/TSG/007/0034/06.09.2005 (OJ C 267, 9.11.2007, p. 40).

Dwójniak, EC No: PL/TSG/007/036/06.09.2005 (OJ C 268, 10.11.2007, p. 22).

Trójniak, EC No PL/TSG/007/0033/06.09.2005 (OJ C 265, 7.11.2007, p. 29).

Czwórniak, EC No PL/TSG/007/0035/06.09.2006 (OJ C 266, 8.11.2007, p. 27).

Kiełbasa jałowcowa, EC No: PL-TSG-007-0047-05.12.2006 (OJ C 158, 11.7.2009, p. 24).

Kiełbasa myśliwska, EC No: PL-TSG-0007-0053-19.03.2007 (OJ C 160, 14.7.2009, p. 12).

Olej rydzowy, EC No: PL-STG-007-0049-28.12.2006 (OJ C 244, 25.9.2008, p. 27).

(6)  See footnote 3.


Top