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Document 52009SC0725

Commission staff working document - European Year of Volunteering 2011 : evaluation ex ante {COM(2009) 254}

/* SEC/2009/0725 final */

In force

52009SC0725

COMMISSION STAFF WORKING DOCUMENT European Year of Volunteering 2011 Evaluation Ex ante {COM(2009) 254}


EN

(...PICT...)|COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES|

Brussels, 3.6.2009

SEC( 2009) 725

COMMISSION STAFF WORKING DOCUMENT

European Year of Volunteering 2011 Evaluation Ex ante {COM(2009) 254}

TABLE OF CONTENTS

COMMISSION STAFF WORKING DOCUMENT European Year of Volunteering 2011 Evaluation Ex ante 1

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1. Introduction 4

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1.1. Definition of volunteering 4

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1.2. The policy context 4

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2. Problem analysis and needs assessment 5

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2.1. The main challenges 5

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2.2. The target group and its needs 6

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3. What are the objectives that the Year is expected to achieve? 6

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3.1. Objectives and related indicative indicators 7

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4. What are the main policy options and alternative delivery mechanisms? 8

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4.1. No action 8

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4.2. Mainstreaming 8

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4.3. Action plan 8

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4.4. European Year of Volunteering 2011 9

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4.5. What designs for the European Year were considered? 9

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4.5.1. Calls for proposal for volunteering projects at national/regional and local level 10

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4.5.2. European Year coordinated and centralised by the Commission 10

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4.5.3. A completely decentralised European Year 11

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4.5.4. Centralised action at Community level with strong association of the Member States 11

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5. Stakeholder consultation and lessons learned 12

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5.1. Building on recent consultations 12

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5.2. Lessons learned from the evaluation of previous European Years 13

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6. Risks and assumptions 14

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7. Added value of EU involvement 14

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8. Helping to achieve cost-effectiveness 15

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8.1. Cost implications of the European Year 15

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8.1.1. Financial Resources: Summary of commitment appropriations (CA) and payment appropriations (PA) 16

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8.1.2. Objectives of the proposal in terms of their financial cost 17

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8.1.3. Number and type of human resources 17

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8.2. Could the same results be achieved at lower costs? 18

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9. Planning of future monitoring and evaluation 18

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1. Introduction

Volunteering is a core expression of civic participation and puts European values such as solidarity and non discrimination into action thereby contributing to the harmonious development of our societies. Volunteering can extend the aspect of solidarity to a global context and provide European citizens with opportunities to carry their responsibility in relation to global challenges.

At the individual citizen's level, volunteering is also an important learning opportunity because involvement in voluntary activities provides citizens with new skills and competences. Volunteering has therefore always two kinds on benefits: on the one hand it contributes to the social cohesion of the society through its direct outcomes and on the other hand it serves for capacity building of those who volunteer. Through these two dimensions volunteering makes an important contribution to the EU's renewed social agenda focusing on opportunities, access and solidarity.

1.1. Definition of volunteering

Even though there is a vast array of notions, definitions and traditions concerning volunteering in the 27 Member States of the EU, there is a common understanding that the term "volunteering" refers to all forms of voluntary activity, whether formal or informal. It is undertaken of a person's own free-will, choice and motivation, and is without concern for financial gain. It benefits the individual volunteer, communities and society as a whole. It is also a vehicle for individuals and associations to address human, social or environmental needs and concerns, and is often carried out in support of a non-profit organisation or community-based initiative. Voluntary activities do not replace professional, paid employment opportunities but add considerable value to society.

1.2. The policy context

Volunteering can thus make an important contribution to the EU's renewed social agenda that aims to create more opportunities for EU citizens, improve access to quality services and demonstrate solidarity with those who are affected negatively by change, by focusing on empowering and enabling individuals to realize their potential while at the same time helping those who are unable to do so.

The proposed Treaty of Lisbon addresses the issue of civic participation in the context of the democratic principles of the Union. In addition, it provides new competences concerning the participation of young people in democratic life in Europe. It also refers explicitly to the voluntary sector in the context of sports and in relation to the Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps Lisbon Treaty, new Chapter 3 "Humanitarian Aid", new article 118 J 5, new Art. 2 e and new Art. 165 (1) . [1]

Lisbon Treaty, new Chapter 3 "Humanitarian Aid", new article 118 J 5, new Art. 2 e and new Art. 165 (1)

Following the White Paper on Youth of 2001 Doc. "A new impetus for European youth", COM (2001) 681 final of 21.11.2001 , volunteering has been recognised in 2002 by the Member States as a key element of youth policy Council Resolution of 27 June 2002 regarding the framework of European cooperation in the youth field , OJ C168 of 13.07.2002. . Within the Open Method of Coordination for Youth Member States agreed on common objectives for voluntary activities of young people Doc. COM(2004)337 final . In November 2008, the Council adopted a Recommendation Council Recommendation of 20 November 2008 on the mobility of young volunteers across the European Union (2008/C 319/03) on mobility of young volunteers across Europe which aims at enhancing cross-border volunteering of young people within the EU by creating more opportunities and opening national volunteering schemes for young volunteers from other Member States. [2][3][4][5]

Doc. "A new impetus for European youth", COM (2001) 681 final of 21.11.2001

Council Resolution of 27 June 2002 regarding the framework of European cooperation in the youth field , OJ C168 of 13.07.2002.

Doc. COM(2004)337 final

Council Recommendation of 20 November 2008 on the mobility of young volunteers across the European Union (2008/C 319/03)

Volunteering provides a great potential for the EU when it comes to active ageing and demographic change. On this background, the EU has developed punctual initiatives and reflections to promote senior volunteering which contributes to intergenerational solidarity.

Various EU activities, programmes and policies in areas such as education, youth, environment and development tackle volunteering at a European level. The variety of volunteering in Europe, its horizontal nature and its relevance to all age groups call for a unified yet flexible approach.

2. Problem analysis and needs assessment

2.1. The main challenges

Volunteering has the potential to contribute to the harmonious development of European societies in the following way:

· Democratic societies need civic participation, which means that citizens participate in civil society, community and political life. Volunteering is a frequent expression of civic participation . When engaging for the benefit of other individuals and the society as a whole or for their own benefit, volunteers are motivated by core values, and serve their community in an active way. Volunteering is therefore a means to develop citizens’ commitment to their society and to its political life.

· Volunteering can be a tool for the empowerment of all and especially of those who are socially excluded. Volunteering makes an important contribution to social inclusion at the local level. This applies in particular for the integration of migrants . Integration, as a two-way-process of mutual accommodation between the migrants and host society, needs tools and instruments that bring people together and that allow them to work on common projects. Volunteering can contribute to tackling this challenge and help integrating migrants into host communities.

· Volunteering strengthens social cohesion . A society characterised by a highly competitive economy and globalisation is by nature under permanent change, which is very demanding for individuals. Volunteering can be one of the counter-balances and give a social dimension to our society by promoting European values such as solidarity and tolerance. V olunteering contributes to peace building, conflict resolution and reconciliation of divided societies. Voluntary activities reduce racism and prejudice and contribute to intercultural and inter-religious dialogue.

· Through its learning dimension volunteering improves the employability of people providing citizens with new skills and competencies.

· On the other hand, some challenges still remain to be tackled:

· Volunteering has a very varied tradition among the different Member States, and even the connotations that it carries vary to a considerable degree across the EU.

· During the past decades, civic participation has undergone significant change and the modern societies have gradually developed towards greater individualism. The sector has to cope with new types and forms of participation, characterised by selective short term engagement.

· Even if there is diversity, there exist also common obstacle s to volunteering, such as the lack of awareness and information, the lack of support systems (training etc), discouraging legal provisions and an absence of a legal status and limited international exchange schemes.

2.2. The target group and its needs

The target group for volunteering is very large. Everybody can become a volunteer in a certain moment of his or her life, on a regular basis or for a longer or a shorter period of time. Not only the active age population is concerned, but young people and older people are a particularly important target group for volunteering.

The intervention will target the issue from a cross-cutting angle and will therefore address the following target groups:

· Policy makers at different levels;

· Volunteer organisations at local regional, national and European level;

· Volunteers all over Europe;

· Employers;

· Business;

· Media;

· The general public in Europe.

3. What are the objectives that the Year is expected to achieve?

In line with the EU's renewed social agenda, the overall purpose of the European Year shall be to encourage and support – notably through the exchange of experience and good practic es – the efforts of the Member States, their local and regional authorities and civil society to develop favourable conditions for volunteering in Europe . On this basis, four objectives have been laid down:

(1) Working towards an enabling environment for volunteering in the EU - To anchor volunteering as part of promoting civic participation and people-to-people activities in an EU context;

(2) Empowering volunteer organisations and improving the quality of volunteering - To facilitate volunteering and to encourage networking, mobility, cooperation and synergies between volunteer organisations and other sectors in an EU context;

(3) Rewarding and recognising volunteering activities – To encourage appropriate incentives for individuals, companies and volunteer-development organisations and gain more systematic recognition for volunteering by policy makers, civil society organisations and employers for skills and competences developed through volunteering.

(4) Raising awareness about the value of volunteering – To raise general awareness of the importance of volunteering as an expression of civic participation and an example of people-to-people activity which contributes to issues which are of common concern of all Member States, such as a harmonious societal development and economic cohesion.

3.1. Objectives and related indicative indicators

Objectives |Expected results|Indicative indicators|

To work towards an enabling environment for volunteering in the EU;|The European Year of Volunteering should provide input for further policy development;A dialogue is initiated in Member States on volunteering issues;|Extent of new knowledge and ideas which have been developed with the support of the Year;Number of good practices identified;Extent of new dialogue on volunteering in/between Member States;|

To empower volunteer organisations and to improve the quality of volunteering;|(Access to) volunteering is facilitated ;To encourage networking, cooperation, exchange and synergies between volunteer organisations and other sectors; New inputs for volunteer organisations;|Number of organisations having received new inspiration for organising measures aiming at raising the quality of voluntary schemes;Degree of intensity of networking, cooperation and synergies between volunteer organisations and other sectors; Number of volunteer organisations who have found new partners;|

To reward and recognise volunteering activities;|Policy makers, civil society organisations, possible employers and the general public at large provide an (increased) recognition to volunteering; Impact of volunteering to skills and competencies of volunteers is better acknowledged. |Number of initiatives by policy makers, civil society organisations and employers indicating better recognition of volunteering;Extent of use of new systems of recognition of the skills and competences acquired through volunteering;|

To raise awareness about the value of volunteering;|Visibility of volunteering and of its value for the individual and the European society increases|Percentage of participants in the European Year stating that the European year has improved their perception of volunteering;Extent and tone of press and media coverage of the Year itself and the events and initiatives supported (qualitative and quantitative).|

4. What are the main policy options and alternative delivery mechanisms?

Regulatory options cannot be considered, given the absence of clear relevant competencies at EC level. Several options were considered but had to be discarded given their negative or limited impact.

4.1. No action

Not acting would not address the issues considered and could even have political costs, because the potential of volunteering and the momentum of the political context would not be used.

This option was discarded.

4.2. Mainstreaming

Volunteering is relevant for a wide range of Community policies and instruments. It is particularly prominent in the fields of education, culture, youth and citizenship, environment, consumer protection and development. Community programmes in these areas have allowed funding projects approaching volunteering from different viewpoints. It could be an option to intensify mainstreaming by setting up an inter-service group to exchange ideas and compare policy approaches.

Mainstreaming as such would not create learning opportunities between the Member States, which a specific action such as the one a European Year would provide. Mainstreaming would also not enable to reach the necessary critical mass and visibility which is needed in order to explore new opportunities and to draw relevant policy lessons in order to achieve the goals pursued. For these reasons this option alone would not be sufficient and it was discarded.

4.3. Action plan

Another option would be to develop an action plan for volunteering.

As already mentioned above, the Commission has a wide range of instruments operating in the field of volunteering. A possible approach would consist in making an inventory of these actions and in bringing them together under an “Action Plan for Volunteering”.

However before proposing an Action Plan, a wider debate on volunteering would be necessary. Therefore, an action plan is more a complementary than an alternative option: an action plan could be a possible follow-up of the European Year. Therefore, this option was also discarded.

4.4. European Year of Volunteering 2011

A European Year of volunteering seems to be the appropriate mechanism to involve Member States in a joint exercise in an EU context.

It is a timely initiative because it follows the renewed social agenda of the European Union and is in line with the European Year for Combating Poverty and Social Exclusion 2010 and the possible European Year of Active Ageing and Intergenerational Solidarity 2012. It will coincide with the 10 th Anniversary of the International Year of Volunteers 2001, which provides important synergies in terms of mobilising the stakeholders.

It can be expected that the momentum created by key stakeholder organisations when mobilising support for the initiative of the Year will continue and that these stakeholders will be very active and receptive to the outputs of the European Year.

The European Year will give volunteers, volunteer organisations and other stakeholders at local, regional, national and European level the opportunity to make a greater impact and to gain wider recognition for their efforts by participating in the European Year. The Year will therefore help to strengthen the impact of existing policies related to volunteering by generating a critical mass of activities targeting volunteering and by promoting exchange of ideas and good practice.

The European Year will constitute an opportunity for the mobilisation of the relevant Community programmes and actions in 2011 in order to increase overall visibility and the impact of these actions under the Year. This will allow the promotion of a coherent image of the multiplicity of Community projects contributing to volunteering while developing synergies between programmes.

Communication and awareness-raising actions during the Year will thus be able to use a critical mass of concrete projects related to volunteering in numerous sectors. All these projects (and the programmes which support them) will benefit from the additional visibility that the "European Year of the Volunteering" label will bring them and from the public awareness campaign.

Therefore, this option was chosen as appropriate in view of achieving the above mentioned objectives (see section 3).

4.5. What designs for the European Year were considered?

Several methods of intervention for a European Year of Volunteering were considered:

4.5.1. Calls for proposal for volunteering projects at national/regional and local level

Some previous European Years such as the European Year of Education through sport gave priority to this approach – launching calls for proposals for concrete projects. These calls, depending on the cases, were managed on a centralised basis or delegated to the Member States. On the basis of these experiences "Evaluation externe (ex post) de l'année européenne de l'éducation par le sport AEES 2004" , this approach was ruled out for the following reasons:[6]

"Evaluation externe (ex post) de l'année européenne de l'éducation par le sport AEES 2004"

This kind of approach does not create a long-lasting effect;

The launch of open calls for proposals in a field where various Community programmes intervene would have led to inconsistencies and duplication;

The cost of management of specific calls for proposal in terms of human resources would be disproportionate.

Having regard to the field covered by volunteering, the number of projects likely to be proposed would be disproportionate in relation to the budgetary resources available, involving a very high disappointment level of project sponsors;

The budgetary amount possible to allocate to specific calls for proposals within the framework of the Year would not make a significant difference in comparison to the opportunities already available through the existing Community programmes and actions;

4.5.2. European Year coordinated and centralised by the Commission

This option would ensure good coordination at EU level, in administrative and financial terms as well as on content. This would be particularly true for political visibility among EU stakeholders and for mainstreaming volunteering throughout other policy areas at EU level.

However, this option does not seem to be appropriate in encouraging stronger involvement on the part of the Member States and other national, regional and local stakeholders.

In addition, given the substantial differences among Member States and their approach towards volunteering, this option risks being ineffective if it does not take into account national and regional specificities.

Participation would therefore be limited to the EU-level actors and awareness-raising will risk not reaching a broader public.

This option may also appear disproportionate in terms of the objectives to be achieved.

In terms of overall consistency, this option would produce a limited impact at EU level, with no or little influence at national, regional and local level.

4.5.3. A completely decentralised European Year

Completely decentralising the implementation of activities to the Member States would help raising awareness and encouraging participation at national and local levels, as well as ensure a stronger commitment at these levels.

However, this option would risk to leave out the fundamental link between the European level and the national, regional and local level.

Furthermore, it would be difficult to ensure effective coordination of the different activities, which carries the risk of their appearing isolated and disconnected one from another.

The difficulty of ensuring effective coordination could reduce the impact of the European Year in terms of visibility, as well as the possibilities for effective synergies and for transnational comparison and exchange.

While the substantial differences among Member States argue in favour of decentralised actions playing an important role in the implementation of the European Year, an option where the implementation of activities is completely decentralised to the Member States does not seem to ensure effective consistency.

4.5.4. Centralised action at Community level with strong association of the Member States

This option has the potential to achieve political impact at national and European level in raising awareness of the importance of volunteering and contributing to the development of an enabling environment for volunteering in the European Union

· A European Year in which a balance is found between activities implemented at EU level under the supervision of the Commission and action at national, regional and local levels would allow diversities and specificities to be taken into account and, at the same time, meet the need for coherence in implementation.

· This option seems to be effective in terms of reaching actors and policies "on the ground" and in ensuring the necessary link between the different actions and the different levels of intervention. Therefore it ensures a better impact in terms of political commitment at all levels. A stronger impact can also be expected in terms of further policy development.

· The Commission will closely monitor the implementation of national activities and steer the preparatory process for the European Year. Coordination of the different actions by the Commission will increase the visibility of the exercise and create necessary synergies.

· The investment in terms of resources and organisation seems to be justified, given the impact over time in terms of transnational exchange of ideas and good practice, visibility and awareness-raising.

· The chosen option is therefore a European Year which at European level will focus on the exchange of best practices and on communication and awareness-raising measures such as high visibility events. A critical mass of concrete projects will be achieved through mobilisation of all relevant Community programmes incorporating the volunteering dimension. In parallel, the Member States, closely associated with the definition and implementation of the Year, receive Community subsidies for national coordination and key activities.

5. Stakeholder consultation and lessons learned

5.1. Building on recent consultations

Volunteering is a cross-cutting issue concerning all sectors of society, there is no specialised sector dedicated to it.

The Commission has been considering the deepened role that Europe could play in the field of volunteering for some time. A number of recent relevant consultation processes have covered some aspects linked to volunteering.

consultations relating to the Commission's current programmes in the active citizenship, youth, culture and lifelong learning (education and training) domains Commission Staff Working Paper: Proposal for a Decision of the European Parliament and of the Council for an integrated action programme in the field of lifelong learning, extended impact assessment integrating ex ante evaluation requirements, COM(2004)474 final; , [7]

Commission Staff Working Paper: Proposal for a Decision of the European Parliament and of the Council for an integrated action programme in the field of lifelong learning, extended impact assessment integrating ex ante evaluation requirements, COM(2004)474 final;

the consultation process held in the framework of the preparation of the new European framework of youth policy cooperation during autumn 2008 Results on the online public consultations in the youth field, a report to DG EAC under the Framework Contract on Evaluation, Impact Assessment and Related Services by ECOTEC [8]

Results on the online public consultations in the youth field, a report to DG EAC under the Framework Contract on Evaluation, Impact Assessment and Related Services by ECOTEC

The European Economic and Social Committee was consulted by the Commission in April 2006 on the role and impact of volunteering in European Society. In its opinion of December 2006 Opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee: "Voluntary activity: its role in European society and its impact", Doc. SOC/243 – CESE 1575/2006; , it recommended to announce a European Year of Volunteering. [9]

Opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee: "Voluntary activity: its role in European society and its impact", Doc. SOC/243 – CESE 1575/2006;

In 2008, key stakeholders organised themselves formally and created an Alliance of 17 NGO European Volunteer Centre, the Social Platform, Caritas Europa, Solidar, Red Cross/EU Office, the World Scouts Movement, the European Youth Forum, Age, Johanniter International, Volonteurope, the Confederation of European Senior Expert Services, ENGAGE, the European Non-Governmental Sports Organization, Youth Action for Peace and Euclid Network of third sector leaders. that has asked at several occasions to declare the year 2011 the European Year of Volunteering. This alliance has achieved creating a strong momentum and a lot of expectations at the level of civil society organisations active in the field of volunteering.[10]

European Volunteer Centre, the Social Platform, Caritas Europa, Solidar, Red Cross/EU Office, the World Scouts Movement, the European Youth Forum, Age, Johanniter International, Volonteurope, the Confederation of European Senior Expert Services, ENGAGE, the European Non-Governmental Sports Organization, Youth Action for Peace and Euclid Network of third sector leaders.

The European Parliament adopted a Resolution supporting the call for a European Year of Volunteering in July 2008 Written Declaration 0030/2008 of 15 July 2008; . [11]

Written Declaration 0030/2008 of 15 July 2008;

Since 2008, the Commission has had a regular, open dialogue on this initiative with major volunteering organisations. Two meetings were organised i n the framework of the structured dialogue of the Europe for Citizens programme Meetings of 7 June 2008 and 10 March 2009; and two meetings took place between representatives of the Commission and the "Alliance" Meetings of 18 February and 6 March on "Preparing for a European Year of volunteering"; . This focused consultation was considered sufficient during the preparation of the Commission proposal on the European Year of Volunteering. [12][13]

Meetings of 7 June 2008 and 10 March 2009;

Meetings of 18 February and 6 March on "Preparing for a European Year of volunteering";

The results of the consultations indicate that the proposal for a European Year of Volunteering is welcomed by all relevant stakeholders. The stakeholders highlight the potential of such a European Year in terms of communication and mobilisation and provide useful suggestions for the purpose and design of the initiative. The outcomes of the dialogue with the stakeholders have been used to define the objectives and actions for the European Year. The run-up to the European Year will bring further opportunities for a broad range of stakeholders to contribute to its design and preparation.

The consultations undertaken with stakeholders draw the attention of the Commission to the following issues:

To use the full potential of volunteering the issue needs a better recognition across the European Union.

A large number of initiatives exist, but they are scattered and not sufficiently recognised and visible.

Volunteering has an important place, at European level, to put in practice European values such as solidarity and mutual respect .

Volunteers are an example for many people of active civic participation.

Volunteers are important agents when it comes to social inclusion through their engagement for the socially excluded or those at risk of social exclusion.

While it is true that all age-groups and all social groups are concerned, young people and senior citizens are a priority target group of volunteering.

Local volunteers and volunteer organisations have to play a key role in volunteering and its promotion.

Diversity needs to be respected. Volunteering shall not be harmonised across Europe, but different successful approaches in the Member States can be promoted

Consultations with other DGs on the proposal of organising a European Year of Volunteering will be organised from March 2009 onwards. In the first Inter-Service Meeting of 17 March, participating DGs expressed their support for the European Year and underlined the cross-sectoral nature of volunteering.

5.2. Lessons learned from the evaluation of previous European Years

The experience with previous European Years and the ex post evaluation of the European Year of Education through Sport "Evaluation externe (ex post) de l'année européenne de l'éducation par le sport AEES 2004"; showed that European Years: [14]

"Evaluation externe (ex post) de l'année européenne de l'éducation par le sport AEES 2004";

· have proven to be an efficient instrument in putting European political issues at the top of the policy agenda. The broad level of participation within a limited timeframe has helped to harness political support and pave the way for broader political commitments ;

· are designed to involve a range of stakeholders with a view to publicising, debating, exchanging views on a specific theme. They are therefore an effective tool in raising awareness ;

· are efficient instruments for creating synergies between different areas of intervention at EU, Member States and regional/local levels;

· tend to have more added value as compared to individual interventions by Member States. This has also been important in creating political momentum and contributing to policy change .

6. Risks and assumptions

Assumption|Risk|Assessment|

Civil society will react positively to this Year and will actively take part in it|There is a risk of higher expectations towards the activities of the Year|The positive tone of the Year, which is valuing volunteering should be well accepted by the overwhelming majority of stakeholders|

Increased visibility of volunteering|Lack of visibility|A broad information and communication campaign is foreseen. The Commission already has a wide range of instruments (programmes and documents) at its disposal in the field of volunteering; a ll the projects (and programmes which support them) will profit from the additional visibility that will bring the Year . |

EU Member States will react positively and will spontaneously participate in the events; good cooperation between Member States|Lack of political support from some Member States, |The risk that the Year is badly seen by the Member States is weak because the chosen approach ensures a balance between coordination at EU level and implementation at national level. This allows to take account of national or regional specificities. |

Interest and involvement of the media|Negative degree of co-operation with the media|The risk that that the media do not take part in the events of the Year is weak because it the topic is citizen’s oriented. A broad information and communication campaign will stimulate cooperation with the media.|

7. Added value of EU involvement

The objectives of the proposal cannot be achieved to a sufficient extent solely by action by the Member States, because action at national level alone would not benefit from the European dimension of exchanges and of experience and good practice between Member States targeted on promoting volunteering.

Therefore, the coordination at EU level adds a European dimension and contributes to increasing the impact of the European year in terms of transnational exchange of ideas and good practice visibility and awareness-raising.

A European Year of Volunteering will provide the opportunity to demonstrate in a European context, that volunteering increases civic participation thereby addressing one of the key challenges, European societies are facing today. It will generate a policy debate on this issue and boost the exchange of best practice between the Member States in order to create an enabling environment in an EU context.

A European Year of Volunteering will foster a sense of belonging and commitment of citizens to their society at all levels – local, regional, national and European. Through transnational exchange of ideas and cooperation, the European Year will highlight the link between voluntary engagement at a local level and its importance in the European context. Participants in the Year as well as the wider target group will understand that there is a link between their engagement at local level and the European context and that all over Europe, people engage in volunteering for the same underlying values and motivations.

A European Year will raise awareness about the value of volunteering for fostering social cohesion and improving the employability of people. In this sense it tackles problems, all Member States are facing and which are common concern in the European context.

The European Year of Volunteering will build on the European Year for combating Poverty and Social Exclusion 2010 by emphasising the link between volunteering, social inclusion and employment and thus maximising the synergies and the complementarity of these two initiatives.

By targeting also senior citizens who volunteer, the European Year of Volunteering will prepare the ground for some specific actions on volunteering and active ageing which can be a relevant experience for the Year 2012 which may be declared European Year of Active Ageing and Intergenerational Solidarity.

8. Helping to achieve cost-effectiveness

8.1. Cost implications of the European Year

The budget for the European Year 2011 will be EUR 6 000 000. In addition, the Commission has proposed EUR 2 000 000 for preparatory action during 2010.

8.1.1. Financial Resources: Summary of commitment appropriations (CA) and payment appropriations (PA)

EUR million (to 3 decimal places)

Expenditure type|Section no.||Year 2011|2012|n + 2|n + 3|n + 4|n + 5 and later|Total|

Operational expenditure Expenditure that does not fall under Chapter 15 01 of the Title 15 concerned.Expenditure that does not fall under Chapter 15 01 of the Title 15 concerned.|||||||||

Commitment Appropriations (CA)|8.1.|a|6.000||||||6.000|

Payment Appropriations (PA)||b|4.000|2.000|||||6.000|

Administrative expenditure within reference amount Expenditure within article 15 01 04 of Title 15.Expenditure within article 15 01 04 of Title 15.|||||

Technical & administrative assistance (NDA)|8.2.4.|c||||||||

TOTAL REFERENCE AMOUNT||||||||

Commitment Appropriations||a+c|6.000||||||6.000|

Payment Appropriations||b+c|4.000|2.000|||||6.000|

Administrative expenditure not included in reference amount Expenditure within chapter 15 01 other than articles 15 01 04 or 15 01 05.Expenditure within chapter 15 01 other than articles 15 01 04 or 15 01 05.|||

Human resources and associated expenditure (NDA)|8.2.5.|d|0.674|0.186|||||0.860|

Administrative costs, other than human resources and associated costs, not included in reference amount (NDA)|8.2.6.|e|0.106|0.019|||||0.125|

Total indicative financial cost of intervention The Commission has proposed within the preliminary draft budget for the year 2010 to attribute EUR 2.000.000 for the preparatory actions of the year. Adequate human resources will be allocated in 2010 for these preparatory actions.The Commission has proposed within the preliminary draft budget for the year 2010 to attribute EUR 2.000.000 for the preparatory actions of the year. Adequate human resources will be allocated in 2010 for these preparatory actions.|

TOTAL CA including cost of Human Resources||a+c+d+e|6.780|0.205|||||6.985|

TOTAL PA including cost of Human Resources||b+c+d+e|4.780|2.205|||||6.985|

8.1.2. Objectives of the proposal in terms of their financial cost

Commitment appropriations in EUR million (to 3 decimal places)

(Headings of Objectives, actions and outputs should be provided)|Type of output|Av. cost|Year 2011|Year n+1|Year n+2|TOTAL|

|||No. outputs|Total cost|No. outputs|Total cost|No. outputs|Total cost|No. outputs|Total cost|

Better political environment|||||||||||

National structures (20% national co-funding)||0,100|27|2,700|||||27|2,700|

Thematic conference||0,350|1|0,350|||||1|0,350|

Evaluation||0,250|1|0,250|||||1|0,250|

Sub-total Objective 1|||29|3,300|||||29|3,300|

Empowering|||||||||||

Thematic conference||0,350|1|0,350|||||1|0,350|

Sub-total Objective 2||0,350|1|0,350|||||1|0,350|

Recognition|||||||||||

Thematic conference||0,350|1|0,350|||||1|0,350|

Sub-total Objective 3||0,350|1|0,350|||||1|0,350|

Awareness raising|||||||||||

Communication campaign||1,500|1|1,500|||||1|1,500|

Final conference||0,500|1|0,500|||||1|0,500|

Sub-total Objective 4||2,000|2|2,000|||||2|2,000|

TOTAL COST|||33|6,000|||||33|6,000|

8.1.3. Number and type of human resources

Types of post||Staff to be assigned to management of the action using existing and/or additional resources ( number of posts/FTEs )|

||Year 2011|Year 2012|Year n+2|Year n+3|Year n+4|Year n+5|

Officials or temporary staff Cost of which is NOT covered by the reference amount (15 01 01)Cost of which is NOT covered by the reference amount|A*/AD|3|0,5|||||

|B*, C*/AST|2|0,5|||||

Staff financed Cost of which is NOT covered by the reference amount by art. 15 01 02Cost of which is NOT covered by the reference amount|1|1|||||

Other staff Cost of which is included within the reference amount financed by art. 15 01 04/05Cost of which is included within the reference amount|||||||

TOTAL|6|2|||||

8.2. Could the same results be achieved at lower costs?

As the Year will build on the critical mass of projects supported by Community programmes, a significant awareness raising process can be achieved by the Year with a foreseen limited budget of 6 € millions .

The course of action proposed is simple: It builds on existing programmes and on communication and dissemination activities and European events as well as on involvement of the Member States through national coordination structures. The proposal does not involve disproportionate management or administration costs.

Financial leverage effect will be produced through the momentum created. The information and communication actions could be used to increase the number of actions using the logo and so the visibility of the Year.

In conclusion, the cost of the action is the lowest possible. Significant reduction would endanger the viability of the action and would seriously put at risk its expected results and impacts.

9. Planning of future monitoring and evaluation

The design of the monitoring framework will be mainly the responsibility of the Commission in consultation with the Member States. The monitoring system will be coherent with the data needed to furnish the indicators (section 3.1).

An external evaluation exercise will be launched in 2011 in order to gather baseline data, monitor the implementation of the Year and provide interim results if needed. The final evaluation results should be available by mid-2012. This arrangement will allow the Commission to report to the EU institutions by the end of 2012 on the results achieved. The objective of this report will be to assess the results achieved by the European Year of Volunteering in the light of its objectives.

*********

[1] Lisbon Treaty, new Chapter 3 "Humanitarian Aid", new article 118 J 5, new Art. 2 e and new Art. 165 (1)

[2] Doc. "A new impetus for European youth", COM (2001) 681 final of 21.11.2001

[3] Council Resolution of 27 June 2002 regarding the framework of European cooperation in the youth field , OJ C168 of 13.07.2002.

[4] Doc. COM(2004)337 final

[5] Council Recommendation of 20 November 2008 on the mobility of young volunteers across the European Union (2008/C 319/03)

[6] "Evaluation externe (ex post) de l'année européenne de l'éducation par le sport AEES 2004"

[7] Commission Staff Working Paper: Proposal for a Decision of the European Parliament and of the Council for an integrated action programme in the field of lifelong learning, extended impact assessment integrating ex ante evaluation requirements, COM(2004)474 final;

[8] Results on the online public consultations in the youth field, a report to DG EAC under the Framework Contract on Evaluation, Impact Assessment and Related Services by ECOTEC

[9] Opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee: "Voluntary activity: its role in European society and its impact", Doc. SOC/243 – CESE 1575/2006;

[10] European Volunteer Centre, the Social Platform, Caritas Europa, Solidar, Red Cross/EU Office, the World Scouts Movement, the European Youth Forum, Age, Johanniter International, Volonteurope, the Confederation of European Senior Expert Services, ENGAGE, the European Non-Governmental Sports Organization, Youth Action for Peace and Euclid Network of third sector leaders.

[11] Written Declaration 0030/2008 of 15 July 2008;

[12] Meetings of 7 June 2008 and 10 March 2009;

[13] Meetings of 18 February and 6 March on "Preparing for a European Year of volunteering";

[14] "Evaluation externe (ex post) de l'année européenne de l'éducation par le sport AEES 2004";

[15] Expenditure that does not fall under Chapter 15 01 of the Title 15 concerned.

[16] Expenditure within article 15 01 04 of Title 15.

[17] Expenditure within chapter 15 01 other than articles 15 01 04 or 15 01 05.

[18] The Commission has proposed within the preliminary draft budget for the year 2010 to attribute EUR 2.000.000 for the preparatory actions of the year. Adequate human resources will be allocated in 2010 for these preparatory actions.

[19] Cost of which is NOT covered by the reference amount

[20] Cost of which is NOT covered by the reference amount

[21] Cost of which is included within the reference amount

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