EUR-Lex Access to European Union law

Back to EUR-Lex homepage

This document is an excerpt from the EUR-Lex website

Document 52006XC0923(06)

Report from the Commission on food irradiation for the year 2004

OJ C 230, 23.9.2006, p. 28–45 (ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, IT, LV, LT, HU, NL, PL, PT, SK, SL, FI, SV)

23.9.2006   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

C 230/28


Report from the Commission on food irradiation for the year 2004

(2006/C 230/08)

SUMMARY

Under Article 7(3) of Directive 1999/2/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 February 1999 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States concerning foods and food ingredients treated with ionising radiation (1), the Member States have to forward to the Commission every year:

the results of checks carried out in irradiation facilities, in particular regarding the categories and quantities of products treated and the dose administered

and

the results of checks carried out at the product marketing stage and the methods used to detect irradiated foods.

In 2004, irradiation facilities had approval in 10 Member States. 7 Member States provided the information requested with respect to food categories treated, quantities or doses. As a consequence, the precise amount of foods irradiated in the EU during 2004 is not known.

16 Member States reported checks on foods placed on the market. In total, 7169 food samples were checked in 2004. About 3,9 % of products on the market were found to be irradiated and not labelled. In particular, products imported from Asia, especially Asian-type noodles and dried prepared noodles, appear to be illegally irradiated.

Differences between Member States regarding the results of controls can partly be explained by the choice of samples and the performance of the analytical methods used.

1.   Legal basis and background

Under Article 7(3) of Directive 1999/2/EC, the Member States are required to forward to the Commission every year:

the results of checks carried out in irradiation facilities, in particular regarding the categories and quantities of products treated and the dose administered

and

the results of checks carried out at the product marketing stage and the methods used to detect irradiated foods.

The Commission publishes the results in annual reports in the Official Journal of the European Union.

This report covers the period from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2004.

Information on general aspects of food irradiation is available on the website of the European Commission's Directorate-General for Health and Consumer Protection2.

1.1.   Irradiation facilities

Under Article 3(2) of Directive 1999/2/EC, food may be irradiated only in approved irradiation facilities. For facilities in the EU, approval is given by the competent authorities of the Member States (2). The Member States have to inform the Commission of their approved irradiation facilities (Article 7(1)).

The list of authorised facilities in the Member States has been published by the Commission (3).

1.2.   Irradiated foods

The irradiation of dried aromatic herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings is authorised in the EU (Directive 1999/3/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 February 1999 on the establishment of a Community list of food and food ingredients treated with ionising radiation (4)). In addition, 6 Member States have notified that they maintain national authorisations for certain foods in accordance with Article 4(4) of Directive 1999/2/EC. The list of national authorisations has been published by the Commission (5).

Under Article 6 of Directive 1999/2/EC, any irradiated food or any irradiated food ingredient of a compound food must be labelled with the words ‘irradiated’ or ‘treated with ionising radiation’.

To enforce correct labelling or to detect non-authorised products, several analytical methods have been standardised by the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN), following a mandate given by the European Commission.

2.   Results of checks carried out in irradiation facilities

Details of the facilities in the Member states can be found at the Commission website:

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/food/biosafety/irradiation/approved_facilities_en.pdf

The Member States submitted the following information:

2.1.   Belgium

Inspections by the competent authorities in 2004 confirmed the compliance of the irradiation facility IBA Mediris S.A. with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in this facility in 2004.

Food

Amount

(t) (6)

Shrimps

685,7

Frog's legs

2 688,4

Herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings

496,0

Frozen vegetables

143,4

Cheese

26,6

Eggs

168,9

Poultry/Game

219,8

Meat

966,8

Fish

191,9

Dried fruits

2,8

Starch

112,5

Plasma

46,4

Prepared dishes

167,5

Total

5 776,6

2.2.   Czech Republic

Inspections by the competent authorities in 2004 confirmed the compliance of the irradiation facility Artim spol.s.r.o. with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in this facility in 2004.

Food

Amount

(t)

Overall average absorbed radiation dose

(KGy)

Dried aromatic herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings

460,3

5

Egg white

0,01

3

Total

460,8

 

2.3.   Germany

During the reporting period, there were four approved irradiation facilities in Germany:

(a)

Gamma Service Produktbestrahlung GmbH, Radeberg

Inspections by the competent authorities in 2004 confirmed the compliance of the irradiation facility with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in this facility in 2004.

Food

Quantity

(t)

Average absorbed dose

(kGy)

Dried vegetables

3,3

<10

Herbs and seasonings

338,4

<10

Other foodstuffs (guarana seed)

0,7

<10

Total

342,4

 

(b)

Beta-Gamma Service GmbH&Co. KG, Wiehl

Inspections by the competent authorities in 2004 confirmed the compliance of the irradiation facility with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in this facility in 2004.

Food

Quantity

[t]

Average absorbed dose

[kGy]

Granulated slippery jack mushroom

1,20

6,6

Plant raw materials (parsley, dill, cilantro)

2,50

6,3

Powdered spinach

4,32

6,5

Powdered celery/horse radish

3,00

6,6

Parsley

13,00

5,2

Total

24,02

 

(c)

Isotron Deutschland GmbH, Allershausen

Inspections by the competent authorities in 2004 confirmed the compliance of the irradiation facility with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in this facility in 2004.

Food

Quantity

[t]

Average absorbed dose

[kGy]

Seasonings

53

7-9

Herbs

440

7-9

Total

429,21

 

(d)

Gamma-Service GmbH&Co KG, Bruchsal

No food products were irradiated in this facility in 2004.

2.4.   Spain

In Spain, there are two facilities approved for the irradiation of foods.

No information has been forwarded by this Member State on the results of checks carried out in the facilities.

2.5.   France

In France, there are seven facilities approved for the irradiation of foods.

Inspections by the competent authorities in 2004 confirmed the compliance of the irradiation facility with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in the facilities in 2004.

Food

Quantity

[t]

Average absorbed dose

[kGy]

Herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings

203

10

Frozen herbs

1

10

Dried vegetables and fruits

2

1

Gum arabic

28

3

Casein, caseinates

54

6

Mechanically recovered poultry meat, offal of poultry

635

5

Frozen frog legs

813

5

Shrimps

20

 

Total

1 802

 

2.6.   Hungary

In Hungary, there is one facility approved for the irradiation of foods.

No information has been forwarded by this Member State on the results of checks carried out in the facility.

2.7.   Italy

In Italy, there is one facility approved for the irradiation of foods.

No information has been forwarded by this Member State on the results of checks carried out in the facility.

2.8.   The Netherlands

In the Netherlands, there are two facilities approved for the irradiation of foods.

During 2004, a general inspection of the Isotron facility in Ede was organised. The facility in Etten-Leur was only inspected for HACCP. No information has been forwarded on the results of the inspections carried out.

The following table shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in the facilities in 2004.

Products in 2004

Quantity

[t] (7)

Spices/Herbs

1 638,4

Dehydrated vegetables

1 088

Poultry meat (frozen)

23,2

Shrimps (frozen)

284,8

Frog parts

64

Egg white (cooled)

1,6

Food (8)

1 647,2

Samples food

21,6

Total

4 768,8

2.9.   Poland

In Poland, there are two facilities approved for the irradiation of foods:

The installation of the Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry Technical University of Lodz was inspected by the State Sanitary Inspection and in compliance with EU Directive 1999/2/CE.

The following tables shows the categories and quantities of foods irradiated in the facilities in 2004.

1.

Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and technology, Warsaw

Food

Quantity

[t]

Average absorbed dose

[kGy]

Spices, Herbs, dehydrated vegetables

619,3

7

Dried mushrooms

61,4

5-7

Total

680,7

1

2.

Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry Technical university of Lodz.

Food

Quantity

[t]

Average absorbed dose

[kGy]

Spices

47,8

8

Total

47,8

 

2.10.   The United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, there is one facility approved for the irradiation of foods.

The facility (reference EW/04) was inspected by the Food Standards Agency in December 2004. The facility complied with its licence and with the requirements of Directive 1999/2/EC.

No food was irradiated under licence in the UK in 2004.

2.11.   Summary for the EU

10 Member States, including 3 new Member States, have facilities approved in accordance with Article 7(2) of Directive 1999/2/EC.

Only 4 Member States forwarded to the Commission the results of checks carried out in irradiation facilities. Spain, Hungary and Italy did not provide such information.

The exact amount of foodstuffs irradiated in the Union cannot thus be determined.

3.   Results of checks carried out at the product marketing stage and the methods used to detect irradiated foods

The Member States submitted the following information:

3.1.   Austria

118 samples were checked for ionising radiation treatment. Irradiation was confirmed in one sample of dried fish, taken in connection with an inspection following a notification through the RASFF.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 118

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled

Basil

2

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Chilli

2

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Cloves

1

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Marjoram

4

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Oregano

4

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Paprika

7

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Pepper

10

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Peppermint

1

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Rosemary

4

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Herbal tea (spiced)

34

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Thyme

5

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Chicken

14

0

EN 1786

Turkey

3

0

EN 1786

Duck

15

0

EN 1786

Goose

11

0

EN 1786

Dried fish

1

1

EN 1785

TOTAL

117

1

 

Total in % of analysed samples

99

1

 

3.2.   Belgium

In total, 225 samples were analysed. None were found to be irradiated.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 225

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled (origin)

Frozen peeled or decapitated shrimps

40

0

EN 1785

Dried herbs and spices

44

0

EN 1785

Mechanically recovered poultry meat

23

0

EN 1785

Fresh strawberries

27

0

EN 1785

Grated cheese

42

0

EN 1785

Total

225

0

 

Total in % of analysed samples

100

0

 

3.3.   Cyprus

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

3.4.   Czech Republic

In total, 17 samples were analysed. 1 sample of herbal tea was positive for irradiation and was not correctly labelled.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 17

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled

Spices

8

0

EN 13751

EN 1788

Herbal tea products

3

1

EN 13751

EN 1788

Food supplements

5

0

EN 13751

EN 1788

Total

16

1

 

Total in % of analysed samples

94

6

 

3.5.   Germany

4302 food samples were examined. 74 of these, i.e. 1,7 % on average, were non-compliant: 62 samples were incorrectly labelled and 12 were found to have been illegally irradiated.

The infringements are distributed very unevenly over product categories. In the group ‘Asian noodle snacks, party snacks, pizza, TV snacks’, 5 of 14 samples (36 %) had been irradiated and were not correctly labelled. The same was true for 18 % of dried prepared meals.

It should be noted that products from Asia accounted for most of the non-compliant samples.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 4302

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled (9) (origin)

Milk/milk products

52

0

EN 1788

EN 1787

EN 1784

EN 1785

Cheese with herbs

57

0

EN 1788

EN 1784

EN 1787

Butter with herbs

28

0

EN 1787

EN 1788

Eggs, egg products

6

0

EN 1784 mod.

Meat (including frozen meat, except poultry, game)

11

0

EN 1784 mod.

EN 1786

Meat products (except sausages)

31

1 (9)

(Vietnam)

EN 1786

EN 1788

Sausages

69

0

EN 1784 mod.

EN 1786

EN 1788

EN 1787

Poultry

124

0

EN 1784

EN 1786

Game

12

0

EN 1786

EN 1784

Fish and fisheries products

76

4 (9)

(Thailand)

EN 1784

EN 1786

EN 1788

Crustaceans, shellfish, mussels and other aquatic animals including their products

227

2 (9)

EN 1786

EN 1788

L 12.01-1

Pulses

40

0

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751 (Screening)

Soups, sauces

69

3

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Cereals and cereal products

68

 

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Oil seeds

83

0

EN 1784

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Nuts

307

0

EN 1784 mod.

EN 1786

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Potatoes, parts of plants with high content of starch

37

0

EN 1787

EN 13751

EN 1788

Fresh vegetables, salad

86

0

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Dried vegetables, vegetable products

112

2 (9)

(China, powdered spinach)

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751 (Screening)

Mushrooms, fresh

79

0

EN 1788

EN 13751

Mushrooms, dried or mushroom products

281

3 + 2 (9)

(Asia, Italy, Germany)

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751 (Screening)

Fresh fruits

192

1 (9)

EN 1784 mod.

EN 1784

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Dried fruits or fruit products

213

0

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13708

EN 13751

L 30.00-3

Coffee, raw

15

0

EN 1788

Teas, tea-like products

291

0

EN 1788

EN 1787

EN 13751

EN 13751 (Screening)

Ready-to-serve meals

8

0

EN 1786

EN 1787

EN 1788

Spices, including preparations and seasoning salt

1 268

34

EN 1786

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

EN 13751 (Screening)

EN 13788

Herbs

171

2

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

EN 13788

Dry prepared meals

73

13

(Vietnam, Taiwan, Turkey, Germany)

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

Asian noodle snacks, party snacks, pizza, TV snacks

9

5

EN 1787

EN 1788

Food supplements

90

2

EN 1784 mod.

EN 1787

EN 1788

EN 13751

EN 13751 (Screening)

Other

43

 

EN 1787

EN 1788

Total

4 228

74

 

Total in % of analysed samples

98

2

 

3.6.   Denmark

The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration (DVFA) examined 53 samples herbal food supplements and herbal raw materials for food supplements. 3 samples had been irradiated or contained irradiated ingredients. Non of them were correctly labelled in relation to irradiation.

Food analysed

Number of samples analysed: 53

CEN methods used

Result: not irradiated

Result: irradiated, not properly labelled

Herbal food supplements and herbal raw materials for food supplements

50

3

EN 13783 (screening) and

EN 1788 (verification)

Total

50

3

 

Total in % of analysed samples

94

6

 

3.7.   Estonia

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

3.8.   Greece

In total, 76 samples were analysed. The 5 positive samples were food supplements. No information was given about the labelling of these samples.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 76

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated

Dried spices and herbs

34

0

EN 13751

Food supplements

30

5

EN 13751

Cocoa

11

0

EN 13751

Fish

1

0

EN 13751

Total

71

5

 

Total in % of analysed samples

93

7

 

3.9.   Spain

No information has been forwarded by this Member State on the results of checks carried out at the marketplace.

3.10.   Finland

Altogether, 309 samples were analysed. Of the 297 samples of dried spices and herbs analysed, 84 samples were found to contain irradiated material. Most of these were spice mixtures in instant noodle packages imported from China and other Asian countries.

A total of 12 food supplements were analysed and 8 were found to contain irradiated material.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 309

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled

Dried spices and herbs

213

84

EN 13751

EN 1788

Food supplements

4

8

EN 13751

EN 1788

Total

217

92

 

Total in % of analysed samples

70

30

 

3.11.   France

In total, 60 samples, most of them spices were analysed. None were found to be irradiated.

3.12.   Hungary

In total, 134 samples were analysed. 2 samples of herbs were positive for irradiation, one of which was not correctly labelled.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 134

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated (10)

Herbs

117

2

EN 1788

Tea

15

0

EN 1788

Total

132

2

 

Total in % of analysed samples

99

1

 

3.13.   Ireland

In total, 586 samples were analysed of which 9 were confirmed to be irradiated.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 586

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled

Chicken sausages

1

0

EN 13751

EN 1788

Prawns

10

0

Soups, broths and sauces

43

2

Cereal and bakery products

7

1

Fruit and vegetables

79

0

Herbs, spices and seasonings

342

3

Coffee and tea

23

2

Seeds

62

1

Foods intended for special nutritional uses

1

0

Food supplements

7

0

Total

577

9

 

Total in % of analysed samples

98

2

 

3.14.   Italy

No information has been forwarded by this Member State on the results of checks carried out at the marketplace.

3.15.   Latvia

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

3.16.   Lithuania

2 samples were tested: 1 sample of laurel leaves and 1 sample of green tea. Both were negative.

Documentary checks of dried aromatic herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings in 300 food stores were performed, but no information about the possible treatment of these dried aromatic herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings with ionising radiation was obtained.

3.17.   Luxembourg

In total, 50 samples were analysed, none of which tested positive for irradiation

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 50

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated

Spices

10

0

EN 1788

Potatoes

10

0

EN 1788

Tea

10

0

EN 1788

Crustaceans: Prawn

10

0

EN 1788

Onion

10

0

EN 1788

Total

50

0

 

Total in % of analysed samples

100

0

 

3.18.   Malta

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

3.19.   The Netherlands

In total, 430 samples were taken in the marketplace and analysed for irradiation. Of these 430 samples, 45 proved to be irradiated. Only 2 of the irradiated samples were correctly labelled as such. No indication of the origin of the positive samples was given.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 430

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated (11)

Dietary supplements

165

38

EN 13751

EN 1788

Spices and herbs

220

7

EN 13751

EN 1788

Total

385

45

 

Total in % of analysed samples

90

10

 

3.20.   Poland

In total, 121 samples were analysed. 7 samples tested positive for irradiation, none of which were correctly labelled.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 121

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated, not correctly labelled

Dried herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings

60

6

(Singapore, India)

EN 1788

Potatoes

2

0

EN 1788

Onion and garlic

13

0

EN 1788

Poultry

7

0

EN 1788

Unshelled nuts

24

1

EN 1788

Prawns, fish

8

0

EN 1788

Total

114

7

 

Total in % of analysed samples

94

6

 

3.21.   Portugal

No information has been forwarded by this Member State on the results of checks carried out at the marketplace.

3.22.   Sweden

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

3.23.   Slovakia

In total, 10 samples comprising sunflower seed, hazelnuts, peanuts and almonds were tested with the GC method EN 1784. The results indicate that none of the samples were irradiated.

3.24.   Slovenia

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

3.25.   The United Kingdom

In total, 676 products were sampled by UK local enforcement authorities and analysed using standardised detection tests for irradiated food. Of these 676 samples, 40 (6 %) were found to be irradiated. The 33 samples reported as ‘inconclusive’ were identified as intermediate using CEN method EN13751:2002, and were not analysed further, or were samples of 'low sensitivity' such that the mineral grain fraction of the samples was insufficient to carry out accurate analysis.

Food analysed

Number of analysed samples: 676

CEN method used

Result: non-irradiated

Result: irradiated

Dried herbs, spices and vegetable seasonings

333

10

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Dried ready meals

30

14

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Couscous and dried seasonings

0

1

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Dried soup mixes

5

0

EN13751:2002

Noodles and dried seasoningsA

18

12

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Tortillas and dried seasonings

2

0

EN13751:2002

Rice and dried seasonings

2

0

EN13751:2002

Pasta and dried seasonings

2

1

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Mushrooms and edible fungi (dried and fresh)

4

1

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Dried fruit

47

0

EN13751:2002

Fresh fruit

17

0

EN13751:2002

Vegetables including onions

10

0

EN13751:2002

Herbal teas

21

0

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Seafood, i.e. shellfish, prawns, shrimps and fish

40

0

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Dried food ingredientsB

4

0

EN13751:2002

Nuts

1

0

EN13751:2002

Food supplements

96

15

EN13751:2002;

EN 1778:2001

Total

636

40

 

Total in % of analysed samples

94

6

3.26.   Summary for the EU

The following table summarises the samples analysed and the results obtained for the EU as a whole:

Member State

Number of samples non-irradiated

Number of samples irradiated

% of samples irradiated, not correctly labelled

AT

117

1

1

BE

225

0

0

CY

NAC

NAC

NAC

CZ

16

1

6

DE

4228

74

2

DK

50

3

6

EE

NAC

NAC

NAC

EL

71

5

7

ES

NI

NI

NI

FI

217

92

30

FR

60

0

0

HU

132

2 (12)

1

IE

577

9

0

IT

NI

NI

NI

LV

NAC

NAC

NAC

LT

2

0

0

LU

50

0

0

MT

NAC

NAC

NAC

NL

385

45 (12)

10

PL

114

7

6

PT

NI

NI

NI

SE

NAC

NAC

NAC

SK

10

0

0

SI

NAC

NAC

NAC

UK

636

40

6

Total

6 890

279

3,9

NI

:

No information has been forwarded by the Member State

NAC

:

No analytical checks were performed in 2004.

4.   Conclusions

4.1.   Results of checks carried out in irradiation facilities

Directive 1999/2/EC requires the Member States to inform the Commission about the results of checks in irradiation facilities, the categories and quantities of foods irradiated and the average doses applied.

In 2004, irradiation facilities had approval in 10 Member States. Compared to 2003, facilities in 3 new Member States were added to the list of approved facilities in the Member States.

Only 7 of the 10 Member States provided the information requested with respect to the food categories treated.

Due this incomplete reporting, the precise amount of foods irradiated in the EU during 2004 is not known.

4.2.   Results of checks carried out at the product marketing stage

In 2004, 16 Member States performed analytical checks and submitted the requested data. 6 Member States informed the Commission that they did not perform analytical checks during the period covered by the present report.

The information submitted shows that during 2004, 3,9 % of samples were irradiated and not correctly labelled.

The infringements are unevenly distributed over product categories. Products imported from Asia, especially Asian-type noodles and dried prepared noodles, are particularly concerned. In addition, it should be noted that in 2004, there were no facilities in Asia approved by the European Community.

The Commission expects that the numbers of checks on these products will be increased in all Member States and that Member States will take the appropriate measures.

Differences between Member States regarding the results of controls could partly be explained by the choice of the samples and the performance of the analytical methods used.

4.3.   Deadline for the submission of the results of checks for the 2005 report

The deadline for submitting to the Commission the results of checks performed in 2005, as required under Article 7(3) of Directive 1999/2/EC, is 30 April 2006.


(1)  OJ L 66, 13.3.1999, p. 16. Amended by Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 (OJ L 284, 31.10.2003, p. 1).

(2)  http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/food/biosafety/irradiation/index_en.htm.

(3)  OJ C 187, 7.8.2003, p. 13.

(4)  OJ L 66, 13.3.1999, p. 24.

(5)  OJ C 56, 11.3.2003, p. 5.

(6)  Amounts reported in kg.

(7)  The amounts have been reported as ‘boards’ with an average weight per board of 800 kg.

(8)  Products intended for exports to third countries.

(9)  Labelled as irradiated, though irradiation not permitted.

(10)  One sample was not correctly labelled.

(11)  Two of the samples were correctly labelled.

(12)  Hungary and the Netherlands, respectively, found 1 and 2 samples that were irradiated and correctly labelled.


Top