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Document 52000DC0837

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL - The implementation of Council Directive 91/477/EEC, of 18 June 1991, on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons

/* COM/2000/0837 final */

In force

52000DC0837

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL - The implementation of Council Directive 91/477/EEC, of 18 June 1991, on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons /* COM/2000/0837 final */


REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL - The implementation of Council Directive 91/477/EEC, of 18 June 1991, on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION

2. GENERAL BACKGROUND

2.1. Context and objectives

2.2. Main provisions of the Directive

2.2.1. General

2.2.2. Scope of the Directive and classification of firearms

2.2.3. Arms dealers activity

2.2.4. Acquisition and possession of firearms

2.2.5. Transfers of firearms within the Community

2.2.5.1. Transfers of firearms between Member States (Article 11)

2.2.5.2. Possession of a firearm during a journey (Article 12)

3. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF DIRECTIVE 91/477/EEC

3.1. Transposition instruments

3.2. Achieving the objectives of the Directive in general

3.3. Option for Member States to introduce more stringent measures

3.4. Classification; acquisition and possession of firearms

3.5. Transfers under Article

3.6. Transfers during a journey

3.6.1. European Firearms Pass and the authorisation laid down in Article 12 (1)

3.6.2. European firearms pass and the exception in Art. 12 (2)

3.6.3. Mutual recognition agreements

3.7. Exchange of information between the Member States

3.8. Controls on the possession of weapons at the external frontiers

3.9. Conclusion

4. FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

4.1. Improving the operation of the Directive

4.1.1. European firearms pass

4.1.1.1. Ensuring the coherence of article 12 (2)

4.1.1.2. Giving full effect to the European Firearms Pass

4.1.1.3. Promoting the conclusion of mutual recognition agreements and best practises

4.1.1.4. Temporary transfers

4.1.2. Exchange of information between Member States

4.1.3. Classification of weapons

4.2. Clarifying the scope of the Directive in certain respects

4.2.1. Neutralised firearms

4.2.2. Antique weapons

4.3. Drawing conclusions from the UN Protocol against illicit manufacturing and trafficking in firearms

REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL The implementation of Council Directive 91/477/EEC, of 18 June 1991, on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons

1. INTRODUCTION

(1) Council Directive 91/477/CEE on control of the acquisition and possession of weapons was adopted on 18 June 1991 [1]. Article 17 of the Directive provides that within five years from the date of transposition of the Directive into national law, the Commission shall submit a report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the situation resulting from the application of the Directive, accompanied, if appropriate, by proposals.

[1] OJ L 256, 13.9.1991, p. 51.

(2) In order to draw up a report that is as complete as possible, the Commission needed first to wait until all the Member States had transposed the Directive, in particular Austria, Finland and Sweden for which the time limit was set by the Act of Accession as the end of 1997. Once all the Member States had transposed the Directive, the Commission had to acquire sufficient experience of the application of the Directive. In addition, certain Member States modified the transposition measures that they had originally notified to the Commission. At the meeting of the national experts on the 22 November 1999 and in a letter of 7 January 2000, the Commission asked the Member States to transmit to the Commission their updated legislation concerning the transposition of the Directive. All the Member States have now transmitted their updated legislation to the Commission.

(3) When the Directive had been transposed in all Member States, the Commission sent a questionnaire on its application in May 1999 to the Member States and to the interested parties (European and national federations of hunting, shooting and weapon collectors as well as associations of arms dealers and importers and manufacturers of firearms and ammunition). The Commission received answers to this questionnaire from all the Member States and from 11 European and national federations or associations [2]. In February 2000, the Commission sent a supplementary questionnaire to the Member States which took up certain specific issues, such as the European firearms pass, neutralisation of weapons and transfers of firearms to and from third countries. The Commission has received answers to the supplementary questionnaire from all Member States.

[2] A list of the European and national federations that have given their contribution to the Commission is in Annex III to this Report.

(4) The Commission has also organised meetings with a group of national experts to discuss, inter alia, the answers to the two above-mentioned questionnaires. These meetings were held on 22 November 1999 and 6 July 2000. The Commission also organised a meeting with the interested parties on 20 December 1999.

(5) The answers to the two questionnaires and the discussion of these replies in the meetings of Member States' experts and interested parties have provided the Commission with sufficient information from the situation resulting from the application of the Directive.

(6) This Report begins with a presentation of the context and objectives of the Directive as well as of its main provisions (2. General Background). The Report then evaluates the implementation and operation of the main provisions of the Directive (3. Implementation and operation of the Directive). Finally, the last part of the Report (4. Future developments) contains suggestions for improving the functioning of the Directive and reflects on grounds for defining the scope of the Directive in certain respects.

2. GENERAL BACKGROUND

2.1. Context and objectives

(7) Directive 91/477/EEC of 18 June 1991 was adopted as an accompanying measure to the abolition of internal frontier controls in the Community as of 1 January 1993. The abolition of controls on the possession of weapons at intra-Community frontiers made it necessary to adopt effective rules enabling controls to be carried out within the Member States. To this end, the Directive contains rules on the acquisition and possession of firearms, on the one hand, and on the transfers of firearms between Member States, on the other.

(8) As regards the acquisition and possession of firearms, the laws of the Member States must impose at least the requirements laid down in the Directive, but Member States are in principle entitled to take more stringent measures than those provided for by the Directive.

(9) In respect of transfers of firearms, the Directive establishes the principle that moving from one Member State to another while in possession of a firearm is prohibited. A derogation from this is possible only by following a detailed procedure that enables Member States to be notified that a firearm is being brought into their territory. However, more flexible rules are laid down in respect of hunting and target shooting in order to avoid impeding the free movement of persons more than is necessary. For this purpose in particular, the Directive introduced the European firearms pass, which is a document issued on request to a person lawfully entering into possession of and using a firearm (Article 1(4)). The Commission has adopted a recommendation on a model for the European firearms pass [3].

[3] Recommendation 93/216/EEC, (OJ L 93, 17.4.1993, p. 39). The Recommendation is supplemented by Recommendation 96/129/EEC of 12 January 1996 (OJ L 30, 8.2.1996).

(10) The Schengen aquis [4] also included certain provisions concerning the control and purchase of firearms. In the Amsterdam Treaty, the Schengen acquis was integrated into Community law, which caused certain overlapping with the provisions of Directive 91/477/EEC. Council Decision 1999/436/EC of 20 May 1999 clarified the situation by stating that Articles 77 to 81 and Articles 83 to 90 of the implementing convention had been superseded by Council Directive 91/477/CEE. Thus, most of the provisions on the control and purchase of firearms in the Schengen acquis have been superseded by the provisions of the Directive [5].

[4] Agreements on the gradual abolition of checks at common borders signed by certain Member States of the European Union in Schengen on 14 June 1985 and 19 June 1990.

[5] Article 82 of the Schengen Agreements remained in force. It contains a definition of antique firearms based on a date (1870).

(11) At international level, the draft Protocol against the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms is being negotiated in the context of the United Nations Convention on transnational organised crime. Although the provisions of the Protocol are mainly destined to combat illicit trafficking of firearms, its obligations are of general application and apply thus also to the licit trade in firearms. Since the Protocol has an influence on the Community legal framework, a special section deals with it in this report. [6]

[6] See section 4.3.

2.2. Main provisions of the Directive

2.2.1. General

(12) The provisions of the Directive are by nature technical and complex, as is the legislative technique used for their presentation. This complexity is due to the compromise nature of the Directive which aims to reconcile the abolition of internal frontier controls with the need to maintain, within the Community, control of the acquisition and possession of firearms and firearm transfers between Member States.

(13) It is important to note that the Directive lays down a minimum harmonisation enabling Member States to take in principle more stringent measures than those provided for by the Directive. (Art. 3)

2.2.2. Scope of the Directive and classification of firearms

(14) The Directive applies to weapons as referred to in its Annex I, and in particular, it lays down explicit rules in respect of firearms. Firearms are classified by Annex I into four categories, which correspond to the different regimes of acquisition and possession provided by the Directive:

-Category A: prohibited firearms, such as automatic arms and explosive military missiles and launchers,

-Category B: firearms subject to authorisation, such as semi-automatic firearms or repeating firearms,

-Category C: firearms subject to declaration, such as repeating long firearms,

-Category D other firearms, such as the long firearms with smooth-bore barrels.

(15) The Directive also applies to essential parts of firearms, such as the closing mechanism and the chamber.

(16) The Directive does not apply to certain objects which correspond with the definition of a firearm, if they are used, for instance, for alarm, industrial or technical purposes, or animal slaughter. Firearms rendered permanently unfit for use as well as antique weapons or reproductions are also excluded from the scope of the Directive (Annex I, section III). The Directive also does not apply to the acquisition and possession of firearms by certain public bodies, collectors and cultural organisations which are recognised as such by the Member State in whose territory they are established. Commercial transfers of military weapons and ammunition are also outside the scope of the Directive (Article 2 (2)).

2.2.3. Arms dealers activity

(17) The Directive lays down minimum level of harmonisation of the conditions for the activity of arms dealers. This activity is either subject to authorisation (categories A and B) or subject to declaration (Categories C and D). (Article 4).

2.2.4. Acquisition and possession of firearms

(18) As mentioned above, the Directive lays down minimum conditions to be met for the acquisition and possession of firearms in the Member States. It is important to note that it does not, however, affect national provisions on the carrying of weapons, such as rules banning the carrying of weapons, even those lawfully in the bearer's possession, on certain occasions. The Directive also does not affect national rules on hunting, e.g. on hunting permits or shooting seasons, or national rules on target shooting, notably the question of whether minors can take part. (Article 2 (1)).

(19) The Directive lays down an obligation on Member States to prohibit the acquisition and possession of firearms of category A. Authorisations may, however be granted in special cases (Article 6). As regards firearms of category B, Member States shall make the acquisition and possession subject at least to authorisation (Article 7). The possession of firearms of category C shall to be subject at least to a declaration to the authorities in the Member State where the firearm is held (Article 8). As regards firearms of category D, Member States do not have to make the acquisition and possession subject to authorisation or declaration, although this is not expressly stated in the Directive.

(20) The Directive also lays down certain minimum conditions to be met by the persons acquiring a firearm, in terms of age, reason, etc. (Article 5).

(21) The acquisition and possession of firearms in one Member State by a person who is a resident of another Member State is subject to specific conditions in the Directive. The Member State of residence shall in this case be informed or its prior agreement shall be required for acquisition or possession, depending on the category of firearm (Article 7). The Directive also lays down rules as regards the handing over of a firearm by a dealer to a person who is not a resident of the Member State in question (Article 9).

2.2.5. Transfers of firearms within the Community

(22) As mentioned above, the transfer of a firearm from one Member State to another is only possible if the detailed procedures provided for in the Directive are followed: either the procedure to be applied to transfers of firearms between Member States (Article 11), or the procedure to be applied to transfers of firearms by individuals during a journey (Article 12).

2.2.5.1. Transfers of firearms between Member States (Article 11)

(23) The transfer of firearms from one Member State to another is based on the prior granting of a licence by the Member State in which the firearms originate. In the case of transfers of firearms between arms dealers, Member States may replace this system of prior licences by an authorisation valid for a maximum of three years.

(24) The transfer of firearms may also be subject to authorisation in the Member State of destination. If a Member State does not require authorisation for the transfer of certain firearms to its territory, it shall communicate to the other Member States a list of the firearms concerned.

(25) Member States shall transmit all useful information at their disposal concerning definitive transfers of firearms to the Member State of destination. To this end, Member States had to set up networks for exchanging information by 1 January 1993 (Article 13).

2.2.5.2. Possession of a firearm during a journey (Article 12)

(26) In order to possess a firearm during a journey under Article 12, a traveller has to obtain authorisation from each Member State visited in order to enter that country in possession of a firearm.

(27) As a derogation to this procedure, hunters in respect of categories C and D, and marksmen in respect of categories B, C and D may, without prior authorisation, be in possession of these firearms during a journey under the following conditions:

-the purpose of the journey is to engage in hunting or shooting activities

-they are in possession of a European firearms pass stating the firearm or firearms in question

-they are able to substantiate the reason for their journey, in particular by producing an invitation.

(28) It is important to note that the Member States' right to adopt more stringent rules is subject to the rights of the residents of the other Member States under this derogation (Article 3). However, this derogation does not apply to journeys to a Member State which prohibits or subjects to authorisation the firearm in question. In this case an express statement to that effect is entered on the European firearms pass.

(29) Member States may under agreements for the mutual recognition of national documents provide for more flexible arrangements than those provided for in the Directive for movement with firearms within their territories during a journey.

3. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF DIRECTIVE 91/477/EEC

3.1. Transposition instruments

(30) Pursuant to Article 18 of the Directive, the Directive had to be transposed into the national law of the Member States in good time so that the measures provided for by the Directive could be put into effect not later than 1 January 1993. As for Austria, Finland and Sweden the time limit was set by the Act of Accession as the end of 1997.

(31) In accordance with Article 18, all the Member States have notified their transposition measures to the Commission [7].

[7] Annex I to this Report contains references to the national transposition measures.

(32) The Commission has also received notifications under Article 15(4) of national provisions that are more stringent than the minimum standard provided in the Directive, and the Commission has passed such information to the other Member States.

(33) The transposition of the Directive resulted in completely or partially new acts, depending on the existing legislation. The transposition has in the case of one Member State (Luxembourg) been limited to fixing the length of the validity of the European firearms pass.

(34) After the notification of transposition measures, certain Member States modified or completed their legislation on firearms. These modifications were directly linked to the transposition of the provisions of the Directive (e.g. introduction of the European firearms pass in France and Italy) or were aimed at making the arrangements for the acquisition and possession of firearms more stringent. Certain modifications of the firearms legislation were not related to the field of application of the Directive (e.g. arrangements for carrying of weapons).

(35) In the following sections of the report, national transposition measures will be considered by relevant topic.

3.2. Achieving the objectives of the Directive in general

(36) As regards the objectives of the Directive, the answers given by the Member States to the questionnaire show that most Member States thought that these objectives had been achieved. Some Member States noted that since the legislation in the Member States governing the acquisition and possession of weapons prior to the introduction of the Directive complied to a large extent with the requirements of the Directive, the principal achievement of the Directive concerned more the setting up of arrangements for the control of transfers within the Community than the control of acquisition and possession.

(37) Four Member States (Belgium, Finland, Luxembourg and Sweden) felt that the objectives of the Directive were not achieved, although these Member States also considered that the Directive has generally been a good instrument.

(38) Member States have identified as problems, firstly, the difficulties with the exchange of information. The disparity or complexity of national legislations, administrative measures and authorisation procedures, in particular as regards the European firearms pass, and the differences in the classification of firearms were also identified as problems. One Member State (Belgium) thought that efficient means of controlling intra-Community transfers were lacking. Some Member States also felt that certain provisions of the Directive were complex and difficult to interpret and that there was no specific follow-up forum to deal with questions arising from the application of the Directive.

(39) Member States answers to the question concerning unregistered acquisition and possession of weapons since the Directive entered into force have not yielded any significant conclusions: Denmark, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal and Sweden considered the situation stable; Belgium, Finland and Netherlands felt that unregistered acquisition and possession was increasing, whilst Austria, Greece and Spain considered that it had fallen. Four Member States (France, Germany, Ireland and United Kingdom) did not give an opinion, owing to a lack of detailed information. Moreover, some Member States also pointed out that their answers were estimates, since no statistics were available. This fact at least partly explains the division of opinion among the Member States.

(40) The interested parties are, in general, satisfied with the instruments of the Directive and its operation. They have, however, expressed their dissatisfaction with the fact that the Directive has not been correctly applied by Member States, in particular as regards the European firearms pass. For this reason, most of the national and international federations consider that the objectives of the Directive were not achieved or only partially achieved. They identify as problems the disparities in Member States' legislation, the tendency to apply more stringent measures, and shortcomings in the co-operation between Member States. The interested parties note that the free movement of persons is impeded even when they are in possession of the European firearms pass because they are subject to excessive controls by the Member States.

(41) The Commission has received a certain number of Parliamentary questions on the application of the Directive. The Commission has also received two complaints concerning the scope of the Directive. These questions and complaints show that the most problematic area in the application of the Directive is the use of the European firearms pass.

(42) The report now considers the implementation and operation of the main provisions of the Directive, concentrating on the above-mentioned areas identified as problematic.

3.3. Option for Member States to introduce more stringent measures

(43) At the time of the elaboration of the Directive, apart from technical differences there were also appreciable differences in substance between the legislation of the Member States governing the possession of weapons. Therefore, complete harmonisation in this field would have been very difficult and politically unrealistic and it was more appropriate to opt for minimal harmonisation instead and to enable the Member States to maintain or to adopt more stringent measures than those provided in the Directive.

(44) All Member States have adopted more stringent measures, such as making the profession of firearms dealer for categories C and D subject to authorisation, placing an obligation on firearms dealers to keep their registers for more than 5 years or having authorisation procedures for all the firearms categories C and D or for certain firearms in these categories. Some Member States have also classified as firearms those outside the scope of the Directive, e.g. weapons using compressed air (Italy) or neutralised arms (Sweden).

(45) It is important to note that even if Member States are entitled to take more stringent measures, these measures have to respect the rules of the Treaty, and in particular, the rules of the internal market. Although Article 30 of the Treaty provides for a possible derogation with regard to the free movement of goods on the basis of public safety, the measures in question have to be necessary and proportionate to the objective pursued.

3.4. Classification; acquisition and possession of firearms

(46) As mentioned above, the Directive classifies firearms into four categories: category A (prohibited firearms), category B (firearms subject to authorisation), category C (firearms subject to declaration) and category D (firearms that can be sold freely in the Member States).

(47) Since Member States are allowed, according to Article 3, to maintain their more stringent legislation, no genuine harmonisation has taken place as regards the classification of weapons. Certain Member States have not considered it necessary to create any particular classification at all in their legislation, since all the firearms are subject to authorisation (or to prohibition) in their country, while others have provided for a stricter classification than that of the Directive. Furthermore, certain Member States classify as war weapons (Belgium, France) or prohibit (Denmark) certain weapons that are considered to be hunting arms in the other Member States.

(48) As regards category A weapons (fully automatic weapons, etc.) which are required to be prohibited under the Directive, with the possibility of granting authorisation in special cases, they are either prohibited or under special permit in all Member States. Authorisations for category A weapons are very rare in practice, and in certain Member States no authorisation is granted for them at all.

(49) As examples of the special cases in which an authorisation for category A weapons can be granted, Member States mention in their replies to the questionnaire museums or collectors, exhibitions, certain professions, if the firearm is necessary for the exercise of the profession (scientific research or industrial testing) and filming. In some Member States (Finland and Sweden), civilians may possess category A weapons under defence considerations.

(50) The acquisition and possession of category B weapons (e.g. revolvers and pistols) are subject to authorisation in all Member States, as required by the Directive. In 6 Member States authorisation to acquire and possess firearms in category B are separate authorisations, whereas in 9 Member States they take or may take the form of a single administrative decision, as provided for in Article 7 (3) of the Directive.

(51) Most Member States have also submitted to authorisation the firearms of category C (firearms subject to declaration in the Directive) and category D (firearms that can be sold freely according to the Directive) . It is important to note that in fact, 11 Member States have only firearms that are subject to authorisation or prohibition, while only in Austria, Belgium, France and Greece are certain firearms of categories C and D subject to declaration.

(52) The Directive has brought about substantial changes to legislation in France, Belgium and Austria concerning the acquisition and possession of long firearms, which previously enjoyed a more liberal regime. Certain firearms, notably sporting guns, could be sold freely prior to the Directive.

(53) According to the Directive, Member States had an obligation to provide for the compulsory declaration of firearms in category C which had not previously been declared, within one year of the entry into force of the national transposition measures (Art. 8). In most Member States no specific measures were necessary, because firearms in this category were already subject to declaration or authorisation. As regards those Member States where this was not the case, an obligation to declare such firearms has been laid down in the legislation in Austria, France, Greece and Portugal. In Belgium this obligation has not been laid down in the legislation.

(54) As regards handing over of firearms to non-residents, several Member States do not have express provisions for this. The Commission has learned that in those Member States which have category C and D firearms the provisions of the Directive on handing them over are not always followed. In this case, information on the transaction would not always be transmitted either. This is a question that requires further investigation by the Commission.

3.5. Transfers under Article 11

(55) According to the interested parties, the procedure provided in the Directive for transfers between Member States based on control and licence by the Member State of origin was quickly adopted in those Member States where import/export licences were in force. In those Member States where the export of hunting and sporting long firearms was submitted only to a customs control on arrival, the new procedure has introduced an additional bureaucratic element, according to the interested parties.

(56) In the most basic case, transfer consists of completing a declaration of transfer, a copy of which is handed to relevant administrations of the country of origin and the country of destination. In this case, the supplier possesses an authorisation exempting him from requesting a prior licence (Article 11 (3)), and the customer is also exempted from prior consent, on the basis of his professional status or pursuant to the list provided for in Article 11 (4).

(57) Dealer-to-dealer transfers without prior authorisation (Article 11 (3)) are provided for in the legislation in Germany (for arms of categories B, C and D), Austria (all categories), France (categories B, C and D), Spain (categories B, C and D), United Kingdom (categories B, C and D) and Sweden.

(58) Interested parties have informed the Commission of certain minor problems regarding definitive transfers, linked to the exchange of information between Member States. They point out in particular that in some Member States the transfer permit is conditional on authorisation from the authorities of the Member State of destination. Some Member States, however, do not issue these kinds of authorisations, because they consider that this condition is not necessary in their country: e.g. in some Member States (Denmark, Germany) the professional status of dealer authorises the purchase of firearms in another Member State without further formality, and the authorities in these countries do not, therefore, consider it necessary to grant an authorisation for each order. However, national authorities in the Member State of origin do not always seem to have been informed about this.

(59) The basis of the Directive, in this respect, rests on Article 11 (4), according to which each Member State shall communicate to the other Member States the lists of firearms which can be transferred towards its territory without its prior approval. The Directive does not explicitly provide for exempting arms dealers from prior approval on the grounds of their professional status, but it cannot be regarded as prohibiting Member States from granting this possibility. In this case, however, in order for the Directive to operate properly, the other Member States should be informed. Interested parties note that there is, thus, a need for a better co-operation between the Member State here, which would automatically lead to a better respect of the procedures of the Directive.

(60) Interested parties feel that, apart from these minor problems which are ultimately resolved in one way or other, the Directive is operating properly, and the transparency and surveillance of transfers is being ensured, which is essential in their view. They are, nevertheless, dissatisfied with the fact that the Directive has not reduced the administrative burden, which is especially onerous for small and medium-sized businesses. The interested parties would like to see a move towards reducing the level of control exercised by central government in intra-Community trade in favour of surveillance by local authorities, which are generally more flexible, according to the experience of the interested parties.

3.6. Transfers during a journey

3.6.1. European Firearms Pass and the authorisation laid down in Article 12 (1)

(61) As stated above, an authorisation from the Member States visited is needed under Article 12 (1) for travelling while in possession of a firearm. These authorisations shall be recorded in the European firearms pass.

(62) Certain Member States have informed the Commission that they, therefore, require the European firearms pass to be sent to them so that they can enter the authorisation on the pass, with the stamp of the competent authority. The Member States themselves feel that this procedure is time-consuming and complicated.

3.6.2. European firearms pass and the exception in Art. 12 (2)

(63) The European firearms pass is now in use in all Member States (France introduced it in 1998). Most Member States have followed the Commission's recommendation on the model for the pass. The normal times for issuing the pass vary from a couple of days to a couple of weeks.

(64) Article 12 (2) establishes a right for hunters and marksmen who are in possession of the European firearms pass to travel in principle to other Member States for the purposes of hunting or target shooting. The Commission considers that the pass as such is an appropriate way to strike the right balance between hunters and marksmen wishing to move freely within the Community and the need to avoid a situation where exercising this freedom creates security problems.

(65) In some Member States there have been no difficulties with regard to the movement of hunters and marksmen: hunters and marksmen are able to enter their territory for the purposes of hunting or target shooting simply upon presentation of the European firearms pass and an invitation without any other documents or authorisations. In other Member States, however, an authorisation from the national authorities is needed. Certain Member States do not, however, require these authorisations in case of reciprocity with the other Member State in question. Some Member States state in their replies to the questionnaire that they require from hunters or marksmen from other Member States documents other than invitations and hunting permits, in addition to the European firearms pass (i.e. visitors permit in United Kingdom and Ireland).

(66) Such cumulative requirements raise the problem of compatibility with the provisions of the Directive, since Article 3, while establishing the principle that Member States may apply more stringent measures, lays down that such measures are not allowed to affect the rights conferred on residents of Member States under Article 12 (2). In this context, it is, however, important to note that the Directive does not prevent Member States from requesting hunting licences, other documents levying a tax on hunters or documents relating to the use and carrying of weapons in certain circumstances (Art. 2 (1)).

(67) It should also be noted that certain other Member States (Austria, France) have limited the number of arms allowed without national authorisations in this context on practical grounds arguing that it would be very unusual for a hunter or marksman to have several firearms with them when travelling. The Directive, however, does not provide for any limitation on the number of firearms that can be transferred by a hunter or marksmen within the exception provided, and the limitation of the number of firearms may be a serious problem in particular for marksmen needing to carry several firearms to take part in competitions.

(68) It also seems that certain Member States have in this context introduced certain types of controls which are applied to holders of the European firearms pass when they cross the frontiers of these Member States. These controls need to be further investigated by the Commission.

(69) In any case, the second subparagraph of Article 12 (2) limits the exemption for hunters and marksmen to transfers to those Member States that do not prohibit the arms in question or make them subject to authorisation.

(70) In practice, however, some Member States who make the arms in question subject to authorisation, allow hunters and marksmen to travel on their territory if they possess a European firearms pass under the conditions laid down in Article 12 (2) (i.e. Finland), provided the firearms are not banned. The Commission considers that this flexibility is in line with the sprit of the Directive.

(71) In this context, it should be noted that in its amended proposal for the Directive, the Commission proposed that the derogation for hunters and marksmen would not apply if the Member State prohibited the arms in question. It was only at this stage of negotiations with the European Parliament and the Council that it was added to the subparagraph that the derogation would not apply either where Member State made the firearms subject to authorisation.

(72) Since this limitation of the rights of hunters and marksmen under the Directive made the Article in question ambiguous, a further provision was added to the Article, requiring the Commission to examine in consultation with the Member States the effects of the provision, in particular with regard to public order and public safety. The Commission has, therefore, asked the Member States whether there have been particular security problems in the case of hunters and marksmen coming from other Member States. In their replies, all Member States stated that there has been no such problems. This is of particular interest with regard to those Member States allowing hunters and marksmen to enter their territory in possession of a European firearms pass and an invitation, with no requirement for additional documents.

(73) The Commission would like to emphasise that the derogation in Article 12 (2) for hunters and marksmen is not limited only to situations of an organised hunting event to which the person concerned has an invitation. It can also cover situations where the person in question can otherwise justify the reasons for the journey (e.g. owner of a hunting ground in another Member State). It seems that at least some Member States admit hunters and marksmen to their territory in this type of situation.

3.6.3. Mutual recognition agreements

(74) As regards the provision in the Directive for concluding agreements on mutual recognition of national documents for more flexible procedures than those provided in Article 12, only a few Member States state that they have concluded such agreements. However, this provision has allowed certain Member States to make less strict their existing rules applying to hunters and marksmen in relation to certain other Member States. Sometimes these arrangements have been made at regional level.

(75) An example of these agreements in practice is the Nordic countries where hunters and marksmen from the other Nordic countries can travel freely using their national authorisations without the need to have a European firearms pass. These arrangements have been agreed under long-standing Nordic co-operation on legislative matters, predating their accession to the Community.

* * *

(76) A further problem concerning the operation of the European firearms pass and the various statements that should feature on the pass is related to the exchange of information, and this will be dealt with in the following section.

3.7. Exchange of information between the Member States

(77) The Directive includes several provisions which require Member States to exchange information (Articles 8 (3), 13, 7 (2), 8 (2)) or to communicate information via the Commission (Article 15 (4)).

(78) A majority of Member States consider that the exchange of information on definitive transfers (Article 13) is satisfactory, even if they point out that this exchange sometimes concerns only a group of Member States or that forms are sometimes not completed properly. Certain Member States think that the exchange is not satisfactory and information is not always received or is incomplete. Several Member States point out that the exchange of information operates well with some countries but with some countries it does not.

(79) Difficulties seem to arise from the fact that there is no network for exchanging information between all Member States. Article 13 provides for the establishment of information networks according to the content of the information to be exchanged [8].

[8] Annex II to this Report contains a list of competent national authorities for the purpose of Art. 13 (3).

(80) As mentioned above [9], the interested parties have stated that there are certain difficulties in the exchange of information with regard to transfers between arms dealers.

[9] See section 3.5.

(81) Article 8 (3) contains rules on the exchange of information on firearms that are prohibited or subject to authorisation in a particular Member State. Those Member States who have prohibited or made subject to authorisation arms in categories B, C or D should, according to this provision, inform the other Member States, which expressly include a statement to that effect on the European firearms pass. In practice, the replies to the questionnaire show that Member States have not always received such lists, at least not from all other Member States.

(82) Consequently, there has also been difficulties with regard to stating the prohibited firearms or firearms subject to authorisation on the European firearms pass. Moreover, certain Member States feel that this system is too complicated or they fear that the legislation of the Member State in question might have changed in the interim.

(83) This situation is obviously unsatisfactory. These statements are there to inform the hunter or marksman of any restrictions to their freedom to travel to another Member State using a European firearms pass. In the absence of these statements, hunters or marksmen - acting in good faith - have seen their firearm mentioned in their European firearms pass confiscated at the border. In some Member States it has also been the case that the burden of proof to demonstrate that the firearms in question are not prohibited or subject to authorisation in the Member State of destination has been placed on the hunter or marksman - something which was not intended by the Directive.

(84) Finally, it should be noted that several Member States do not have provisions for the exchange of information in the legislation which they have communicated to the Commission.

3.8. Controls on the possession of weapons at the external frontiers

(85) The procedures established by the Directive for transfers of firearms apply only to transfers between the Member States. As far as transfers from and to third countries are concerned, the Directive is limited to stating the logical consequences of the abolition of internal border controls in the Community, i.e. Member States shall intensify controls on the possession of weapons at external Community frontiers (Art. 15).

(86) In general, Member States have not expressed any wish to see this Article supplemented so as to lay down specific provision which would contain procedures for the control of transfers of weapons from and to third countries. Certain Member States (notably Germany), however, are of the opinion that there is a need to establish procedures for the uniform control of weapons at the external frontiers. These opinions have been expressed without prejudice to the outcome of the current negotiations on the draft UN Protocol against the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms (see section 4.3).

3.9. Conclusion

(87) In overall terms, the Directive has been properly transposed in the Member States and its provisions are operating in practice. There appears to be, however, as indicated in the preceding sections, omissions and incorrect transpositions in certain respects.

(88) On the basis of the information received from the interested parties, the difficulties in the application of the Directive seem to be related more to the behaviour of the national authorities than to the provisions of the Directive. The Commission will, therefore, open infringement procedures in those cases where it deems them necessary for the proper application of the provisions of the Directive.

4. FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

(89) The Directive is a result of a compromise of several years of negotiations. In general terms, the Member States and the interested parties are satisfied with the instruments of the Directive and they are therefore not inclined to see the balance struck by the Directive upset by substantial modifications to its framework. Therefore, modification of the Directive would consist more in the clarifying the existing wording of its main provisions than in making substantial changes, in order to ensure that the Directive is applied in a uniform manner throughout the Community.

4.1. Improving the operation of the Directive

(90) The most important issues in this respect are improving the operation of the European firearms pass and the exchange of information between Member States.

4.1.1. European firearms pass

(91) In general terms, there seems to be a need to distinguish more clearly between firearms in general and firearms used for sport and hunting which can be covered by more flexible rules. In order to improve the operation of the European Firearms pass, the Commission intends to propose certain concrete actions and one modification to Article 12.

4.1.1.1. Ensuring the coherence of article 12 (2)

(92) Article 12 (2), which is the result of a compromise, contains, as it stands, certain contradictions and ambiguities. This is particularly the case for the second subparagraph of Article 12 (2), which, by providing that the derogation for hunters and marksmen does not apply to journeys to those countries that prohibit the firearms in question or make them subject to authorisation, cancels in fact the effect of the derogation granted for hunters and marksmen.

(93) The Commission considers that that the second subparagraph of Article 12 (2) could be modified, so that it would be limited to cases where firearms are prohibited in the Member State of destination, as initially proposed by the Commission.

4.1.1.2. Giving full effect to the European Firearms Pass

(94) As regards the administrative procedure applied to the holders of the European Firearms pass, there is a need to establish procedures that are more in line with the objectives of the pass. This is the case in particular for the various statements that are entered on the European firearms pass. In order to ensure that all the statements necessary for the pass to operate are included, in particular those provided in Article 8 (3), it is necessary to improve the exchange of information between Member States [10].

[10] See section 4.1.2.

(95) For the sake of simplicity and in order to avoid having to send the pass in advance to the Member States to be visited, the Commission considers that all the necessary statements should be entered on the pass by the Member State delivering the pass. This would be of special benefit to journeys under Article 12 (1), so that references of the appropriate authorisations needed for travelling to another Member State would not need to be entered on the pass by the authorities of the Member State granting the authorisation but by the Member State delivering the pass.

(96) Majority of Member States are in favour of ensuring that the European firearms pass would be the only pass for Europe, as far as the possession of firearms during a journey is concerned and in particular as regards hunters and marksmen. However, some of them are of the opinion that certain conditions should be fulfilled first, i.e. the requisite authorisation is obtained in a standardised way but nonetheless in a way which meets a high level of security, and rules are applied in more harmonised way and the relevant categories are harmonised. Some Member States are not in favour of this, and they want to reserve the right to require other documents.

4.1.1.3. Promoting the conclusion of mutual recognition agreements and best practises

(97) The Commission considers that agreements on mutual recognition of national documents to make arrangements even more flexible or other best practices can facilitate the movement of hunters and marksmen between Member States.

(98) These agreements or best practises should, however, be non-discriminatory in the sense that they should be open to all those Member States that fulfil the relevant objective criteria. Therefore, there is a need for more transparency and these agreements should be made known to the other Member States and to the Commission.

4.1.1.4. Temporary transfers

(99) The problem of temporary transfer for repairs, is not explicitly addressed in the Directive. The Commission considers that in addition to the procedure of Article 11 applicable to transfers between dealers the procedure laid down in Article 12 (1) of the Directive offers individuals the possibility of seeking the services of a business established in another Member State in this context, i.e. by applying for an authorisation in the Member State where he intends to repair the firearm. The same possibility applies to transfers for exhibitions. It seems that the possibilities offered by this procedure have, nevertheless, not been widely used, and should, therefore, be born in mind in the future.

4.1.2. Exchange of information between Member States

(100) It follows from the analysis of the Directive's implementation presented above that it is necessary to better co-ordinate efforts in this respect and to better structure the information exchanged. The Directive lays down the information networks to be established for the exchange of information on definitive transfers (Art. 13), but the Directive does not further specify which form the exchange of information should take.

(101) In order to facilitate the setting up of the networks for the exchange of information, the Commission has proposed within the group of national experts a series of formulas to be used by the national administrations in the different situations of exchange of information. These formulas relate to the legislation of the Member States in the field of firearms, to information concerning acquisition and detention of firearms by non-residents and to transfers of firearms. These formulas which have not been adopted at Community level but some of which have been taken up by certain Member States in their national legislation, could form a basis for future efforts to develop the exchange of information.

(102) In order to improve the exchange of information and its structure, the Commission intends to create a more effective discussion forum, in the form of a Contact Group, which would act as co-ordination forum for the application and the enforcement of the Directive. This Group would be, in particular, an appropriate forum to discuss concrete proposals for improving the exchange of information, with a view to solving the practical problems presented above regarding the operation of the European firearms pass and transfers between arms dealers. These concrete proposals could include setting up tools for the exchange of information, such as data-bases or internet-sites.

(103) Apart from developing the exchange of information, the Contact Group would also be an appropriate forum for promoting the application of best practises [11] with regard to hunters and marksmen as well for improving the classification of weapons [12].

[11] See section 4.1.1 above.

[12] See section 4.1.3 below.

4.1.3. Classification of weapons

(104) In general terms, there seems to be no particular problems with the classification established by the Directive. Interested parties have reported that the strict arrangements of some Member States and those based on the standards in the Directive generally seem to operate side-by-side in a satisfactory way.

(105) The situation is, however, different with regard to hunting firearms and firearms used by marksmen. As mentioned above, difficulties arise from the fact that certain Member States classify as war weapons or prohibit certain weapons that are considered to be hunting firearms in other Member States. Some Member States have stated that if the European firearms pass were to become the only document accompanying transfers of firearms between Member States for hunters and marksmen, the relevant categories of firearms should be harmonised.

(106) The Commission intends, therefore, to study the feasibility of introducing special treatment in national legislation for hunting firearms and firearms used by marksmen in order to strengthen the status of the European firearms pass.

4.2. Clarifying the scope of the Directive in certain respects

(107) It should be stressed that, as a general rule, judging by their replies to the questionnaires, Member States regard the Community legal framework created by the Directive as sufficient on the whole, and some of them stress that the Directive should be clarified and made more efficient within its present scope of application. There is, however, a need to define more clearly the scope of the Directive in certain respects, by defining certain types of weapons, namely neutralised weapons and antique weapons, which fall outside the scope of the Directive.

4.2.1. Neutralised firearms

(108) As far as neutralised firearms are concerned, the Annex of the Directive is limited to excluding from the definition of a firearms those firearms that have been rendered permanently unfit for use by application of technical procedures which are guaranteed by an official body or recognised by such a body.

(109) Several Member States, but not all, have adopted technical specifications or standards on neutralisation, and neutralisation is verified by a special certification body or the police, which issue a neutralisation certificate for the firearm in question.

(110) On the basis of their replies to the questionnaire, most Member State are in favour of reaching common technical specifications or standards on neutralisation, since firearms that are not properly neutralised can be reactivated and pose a serious danger to public safety. Neutralisation standards vary from Member State to another and, according to some Member States, it is relatively easy to have a neutralisation certificate for badly neutralised arms in those states where the standards are lowest.

(111) In this context, it is, however, appropriate to wait for the results of the negotiations of the UN Protocol against the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, since the Protocol will contain certain provisions on neutralisation, and solutions at Community level should be consistent with those reached at international level. Once the Protocol is adopted, neutralisation standards and specifications could be discussed at Community level. If a consensus can be reached between the Member States on the acceptability of certain common specifications or standards on neutralisation, there would not be any need to consider the way in which these standards - apart from the general requirements foreseen in the draft Protocol - can be transposed at Community level: whether it should be in the Directive or in a separate Act, in a binding or non-binding form. The Commission intends to act accordingly.

4.2.2. Antique weapons

(112) The Directive leaves antique weapons to be regulated by national law. According to the interested parties, in most Member States antique weapons do not need a licence, although it is sometimes necessary to be registered as a collector to be able to have them in large numbers. When defining an antique firearm many countries use a date, but the definition is different in every country. The Schengen acquis provides a definition in Article 82 (which has remained in force) by referring to the date of 1870. However, it allows exceptions, which has led to differences at national level.

(113) According to collectors associations the free movement of collectors' weapons is hampered, because formalities are subject to the discretion of each Member State and because a weapon which is regarded as antique in one Member State might not be considered as such in another. Problems can arise when weapons are bought outside the state of residence or when a person is travelling with such a weapon from one state to another. The Commission considers that here too [13] the option of using the procedure in Article 12 (1), which should solve certain transfer difficulties, has apparently been ignored.

[13] Cf. section 4.1.1.4

(114) Since a proportion of collectors' items are neutralised weapons, many of the problems faced by their holders could be solved by an agreement between Member States or by adoption at Community level of common standards on neutralisation [14].

[14] See section 4.2.1.

(115) As for other antique weapons, some interested parties would prefer a definition which would not only refer to a date, but would be based on more detailed technical criteria (guns using black powder/smokeless powder). Nevertheless, they would prefer not to extend the Directive to these weapons. Some interested parties are, on the other hand, completely satisfied with the Directive as it stands, but are, nevertheless, ready to examine the proposals of those that are not satisfied with its provisions.

(116) The majority of Member States seem to show a preference for a definition by date reference, but consultations that have taken place until now, have not led the Commission to waive the possibility of a new definition combining technical, objective and enforceable criteria with a reference to a specific date.

4.3. Drawing conclusions from the UN Protocol against illicit manufacturing and trafficking in firearms

(117) The draft Protocol against the illicit manufacturing of and trafficking in firearms, parts, components and ammunition is being negotiated in the context of the United Nations Convention on transnational organised crime, and the Protocol will supplement this Convention. As mentioned above, the provisions of the Protocol are mainly aimed at combating the illicit trafficking of firearms, but its obligations are of general application and apply thus also to licit trade in firearms.

(118) The Commission has been given a mandate to negotiate on behalf of the Community certain provisions of the Protocol: these provisions include Articles on Record keeping (Article 8), on Marking of firearms (Article 9), on Deactivated weapons (Article 10), on Export and Import licences (Article 11), on Security and preventive measures (Article 12) and on Brokering (Article 18 a).

(119) To ensure the integrity of the internal market, the Protocol will include a regional integration clause, whereby the Community will be considered as a single Party to the Protocol. Thus, such provisions as those concerning import/export licences or marking at the stage of import, will not apply to intra-Community trade.

(120) However, certain provisions of the Protocol are such that the necessary decisions will have to be taken at the Community level. These are provisions, in particular, concerning record keeping and marking of firearms in general, as well as brokering, and neutralisation. Consequently certain provisions of the Directive may need to be adapted to be brought into line with those of the Protocol,

(121) Since the negotiations on the Protocol shall not be concluded during the year 2000, it is advisable to wait for the Protocol to be adopted before proposing modifications to the Directive, so that the adaptation of the Directive does not need to be redone twice within a short period of time.

* * *

*The Commission invites the European Parliament and the Council to take note of this report.

*The Commission, having taken account of the state of negotiations of the UN Protocol as well as the responses of the European Parliament, the Council and the interested parties to the orientations of the present report, intends to present the appropriate legislative proposals at the beginning of 2002.

ANNEX I

National transposition measures

Austria // Waffengesetz

1. Waffengesetz-Durchführungsverordnung

2. Waffengesetz-Durchführungsverordnung

Gewerbeordnung

Belgium // Loi du 30 janvier 1991 modifiant la loi du 3 janvier 1933 relative à la fabrication , au commerce et au port des armes et au commerce des munitions. - Wet van 30 januari 1991 tot wijziging van de wet van 3 januari 1933 op de vervaardiging van de handel in en het dragen van wapens en op de handel in munitie.

Loi du 5 août 1991 relative à l'importation et au transit d'armes, de munitions et de matériel devant servir spécialement à un usage militaire et de la technologie y afférente - Wet van 5 augustus 1991 betreffende de in-, uit- en doorvoer van wapens, munitie en speciaal voor militair gebruik dienstig materieel en daaraan verbonden technologie.

Circulaire 1260/I/7 relative aux diverses catégories d'armes - Omzendbrief 1260/I/7 inzake de verschillende categoriën wapens - 20/09/1991.

Arrêté royal du 18 janvier 1993 modifiant l'arrêté royal du 20 septembre 1991 exécutant la loi du 3 janvier 1933 relative à la fabrication, au commerce et au port des armes et au commerce des munitions - Koninklijk besluit van 18 januari 1993 tot wijziging van het koninklijk besluit van 20 september 1991 tot uitvoering van de wet van 3 januari 1933 op de vervaardiging van de handel in het dragen van wapens en op de handel in munitie.

Arrêté royal du 8 août 1994 relatif aux Cartes européennes d'armes à feu. Konnklijk besluit van 8 augustus 1994 betreffende de Europese Vuurwapenpassen.

Denmark // Lovbekendtgørelse nr. 67 af 26/01/2000 om våben og eksplosivstoffer.

Bekendtgørelse nr. 66 af 26/01/2000 om våben og ammunition mv.

Cirkulære nr. 8 af 26/01/2000 om våben og ammunition mv.

Bekendtgørelse nr. 972 af 09/12/1992 om erhvervelse, besiddelse og transport af skydevåben for personer bosiddende i et EF-land.

Finland // Ampuma-aselaki/Skjutvapenlag (1/1998) ;

Ampuma-aseasetus/ Skjutvapenförordning (1998/145).

Laki poliisin henkilörekistereistä annetun lain 19 ja 20 :n muuttamisesta / Lag om ändring av 19 och 20 lagen om polisens personregister (3/98).

France // Décret-loi du 18 avril 1939 fixant le régime des matériels de guerre, armes et munitions.

Décret n° 95-589 du 6 mai 1995 modifié relatif à l'application du décret du 18 avril 1939 fixant le régime des matériels de guerre, armes et munitions.

Arrêté du 7 septembre 1995 fixant le régime des armes et des munitions historiques et de collection.

Arrêté ministériel du 06/05/1998 relatif à la carte européenne d'armes à feu, Journal Officiel du 17/05/1998 Page 7531.

Germany // Waffengesetz

Gesetz über die Kontrolle von Kriegswaffen

Erste Verordnung zum Waffengesetz

Allgemeine Verwaltungsvorschrift zum Waffengesetz

Greece // Íüìïò õð'áñéè. 2168/93 : Ñýèìéóç èåìÜôùí ðïõ áöïñïýí üðëá, ðõñïìá÷éêÜ, åêñçêôéêÝò ýëåò, åêñçêôéêïýò ìç÷áíéóìïýò êáé Üëëåò äéáôÜîåéò ( ÖÅÊ Á´ í° 147 ôçò 03/09/1993, óåëßäá 4083).

Ireland // Firearms Act, 1925.

Firearms Act, 1964.

Firearms Act, 1971. An Act to amend and extend the Firearms Acts, 1925 to 1968.

Firearms and Offensive Weapons Act, 1990 (Offensive Weapons) Order, 1991.

Statuory Instrument N° 362 of 1993. European Communities (Acquisition and Possession of Weapons and Ammunition) Regulations, 1993.

Firearms (temporary provisions) Act, 1998, continuance Order, 1999.

Italy // Testo Unico delle leggi di Pubblica Sicurezza, approvato con R.D. del 18 giugno 1931 n. 773, riguardanti le armi comuni da fuoco.

Decreto Legislativo 30 dicembre 1992, n. 527. Attuazione della direttiva 91/477/CEE relativa al controllo dell'acquisizione e della detenzione di armi.

Decreto ministeriale, 30 ottobre 1996, n. 635. Regolamento di esecuzione del decreto legislativo 30 dicembre 1992, n. 527, recante norme di attuazione della direttiva 91/477/CEE relativa al controllo dell'acquisizione e della detenzione di armi.

Luxembourg // Loi du 15 mars 1983 sur les armes et munitions.

Règlement grand-ducal du 2 décembre 1983 complétant la liste des armes prohibées.

Règlement grand-ducal du 13 avril 1983 pris en exécution de la loi sur les armes et munitions.

Règlement grand-ducal du 30 juin 1986 complétant la liste des armes prohibées.

Règlement grand-ducal du 2 février 1990 soumettant les frondes au régime d'autorisation des armes.

Règlement grand-ducal du 27 novembre 1995 modifiant le règlement grand-ducal du 13 avril 1983 pris en exécution de la loi sur les armes et munitions.

Netherlands // Wet van 27 januari 1994 houdende aanpassing van de Wet wapens en munitie aan de Richtlijn van 18 juni 1991 van de Raad van de Europese Gemeenschappen inzake de controle op de verwerving en het voorhanden hebben van wapens - Staatsblad 1994, nr. 84.

Besluit Europese schietwapenspas - Staatsblad 1994, nr. 161 van 7 maart 1994.

Wet van 5 juli 1997, houdende regels inzake het vervaardigen, verhandelen, vervoeren, voorhanden hebben, dragen, enz. van wapens en munitie - Staatsblad 1997, nr. 292.

Portugal // Decreto-Lei n° 37.313 de 21 de Fevereiro de 1949. Regulamento das armas e muniçoes.

Decreto-Lei n.° 399/93 : Transpõe para a orden jurídica interna a Directiva n.° 91/477/CE, do Conselho, de 18 de Junho, relativa ao controlo da adquisiçao e da detençao de armas.

Portaria n.° 1322/93 : Fixa os montantes das taxas de aposiçao de visto prévio e de emissão do cartão europeu de armas de fogo.

Sweden // Vapenlag, Svensk författningssamling (SFS) 1996:67, 8/02/1996

Vapenförordning, Svensk författningssamling (SFS) 1996:70 , 8/02/1996

Spain // Real Decreto, núm. 137/1993, de 29 de enero, por el que se aprueba el Reglamento de Armas.

Corrección de errores del Real Decreto 137/1993, de 29 de enero, por el que se aprueba el Reglamento de Armas.

Real Decreto 316/2000, de 3 de marzo, por el que se modifican algunos preceptos del Reglamento de Armas, aprobado por Real Decreto 137/1993, de 29 de enero, relativos a las licencias y a las revistas de armas.

United kingdom // Firearms Act 1968

Firearms (Amendment) Act 1988

The Firearms Acts (Amendment) Regulations 1992

The Firearms Acts (Amendment) Rules 1992

Firearms (Amendment) Act 1997

Firearms (Amendment) (N° 2) Act 1997

Northern Ireland. The Firearms (Northern Ireland) Order 1981

Import, Export and Customs Powers (Defence) Act 1939

The Import of Goods (Control) Order, 1954

Open General Import Licence

Amendment n° 82 of the Open General Import Licence

The Export of Goods (Control Order 1994 and subsequent Amendment Orders

ANNEX II

List of competent authorities (Art.13 (3))

Austria // Bundesministerium für Inneres

Postfach 100, 1014 Wien

Belgium // Ministère des Affaires Economiques -service licences

Ministerie van Economische Zaken - dienst vergunningen

Rue Général Leman / Generaal Lemanstraat 60

1040 Bruxelles / Brussel

Denmark // Interpol Polititorvet 14

1780 København V

Finland // Sisäasianministeriö

Kirkkokatu 12

PL 257, 00171 Helsinki

France // Ministère de l'intérieur

Place Beauveau

75008 Paris

Direction général des Douanes et Droits Indirects

23, rue de l'Université

75700 Paris Cedex 07 SP

Germany // Bundeskriminalamt

Referat OA 35

D- 65173 Wiesbaden

Greece // Ministry of public order

Directorate of National security

Dep. D

4 Kanellopoulou Str. GR -101.77- Athens

Ireland // Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform

72-76 St. Stephen's Green, Dublin, 2.

Italy // Ministero dell'interno

Dipartimento della Pubblica Sicurezza

Direzione Centrale AA.GG. Servizio Polizia Amministrativa e Sociale; Divisione Armi et Esplosivi

Via Cesare Balbo N. 39

00184 Roma

Luxembourg // Ministère de la Justice

16, Bd. Royal

L-2934, Luxembourg

The Netherlands // Korps Landelijke Politiediensten

Centrale Recherche Informatiedienst

Afdeling vuurwapens

Postbus 3016

2700 KX Zoetermeer

Portugal // Direcção Nacional DA P.S.P

Largo da Penha de França. 1

1170 Lisboa

Spain // Dirección General de la Guardia Civil

Intervención Central de Armas y Explosivos

Dirección: c/. Bernardino Obregón 23

28.012 Madrid

Sweden // Rikspolisstyrelsen

Box 12256

102 26 Stockholm

United kingdom // Home Office

Operational Policing Unit

50 Queen Anne's Gate, London SW1H9AT

ANNEX III

List of national and international federations and associations

*European federations

AECAC: European association of civil Arms Trade

AFEMS: Association of the European Sport Ammunition Manufacturers

AFTSC: Association of sporting Shooting Federations of the European Community

FACE : Federation des Associations de Chasseurs de l'Union européenne

FESAC: Federation of European Societies of Arms Collectors

IEACS: European institute of the Hunting and Sport Weapons

*National federations

ANPAM: Associazione Nazionale Produttori Armi e Munizioni

ASSOARMIERI (IT)

BSSC: British Shooting Sports Council

A.S.H: The Amenable Importers of sporting and hunting Firearms and Accessories Association (FIN)

HBSA: Historical Breechloading Small arms Association (UK)

UFA : Union Française des Amateurs d'Armes

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