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Proposal for a REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL establishing the European Solidarity Corps programme and repealing [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] and Regulation (EU) No 375/2014

COM/2018/440 final - 2018/0230 (COD)
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Brussels,11.6.2018

COM(2018) 440 final

Proposal for a

REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

establishing the European Solidarity Corps programme and repealing [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] and Regulation (EU) No 375/2014

(Text with EEA relevance)

{SWD(2018) 317 final }
{SWD(2018) 318 final }
{SWD(2018) 319 final }


EXPLANATORY MEMORANDUM

1.CONTEXT OF THE PROPOSAL

Reasons and objectives

The European Union is built on solidarity, a shared value which is strongly felt throughout European society. Solidarity is fundamental to the European project, providing a clear compass to guide Europes young people in their aspirations for a better EU. In the Rome Declaration, on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the signature of the Treaty of Rome, the leaders of 27 Member States and of the European Council, the European Parliament and the European Commission reaffirmed their commitment to enhance unity and solidarity in order to increase the strength and resilience of the EU 1 .

The European Commission Presidents State of the Union address of 14 September 2016 emphasised the need to invest in young people and announced the idea of a European Solidarity Corps. The aim of the Corps would be to create opportunities for young people across the EU to make a meaningful contribution to society, show solidarity and develop their skills, thus getting not only work but also invaluable human experience. The Bratislava Summit of 16 September 2016 called for greater political momentum to support young Europeans and establish new EU programmes to improve their opportunities. The European Commissions Communication A European Solidarity Corpsof 7 December 2016 2 launched the first phase of the Corps and reiterated the target of having 100 000 young Europeans taking part in it by 2020. During this initial phase, eight different EU programmes 3 were mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the EU.

As there is potential to further develop solidarity with victims of crises and disasters in non-EU countries, this proposal provides for extending the scope of the European Solidarity Corps to include support to humanitarian aid operations in non-EU countries, including those located in the EU outermost regions' neighbourhood. As the ex ante evaluation accompanying this proposal shows, this extension would serve multiple purposes, such as creating a one-stop-shop for solidarity activities. This will include volunteering by humanitarian aid volunteers, an activity currently supported by the EU Aid Volunteers initiative. This initiative contributes to efforts to strengthen the EU’s capacity to provide needs-based humanitarian assistance and the capacity and resilience of vulnerable or disaster-affected communities in non-EU countries.

This proposal provides the legal framework for the European Solidarity Corps to increase the opportunities for young people to engage in solidarity activities by extending the scope of its activities as well as its geographical scope in this area. This will contribute to addressing not only unmet societal needs in Europe but also humanitarian challenges in non-EU countries. It will also promote the personal, educational, social, civic and professional development of young people.

There are many young people who want to engage in solidarity activities, and there are many unmet needs in communities that could be addressed by involving young people in such activities. Many organisations are looking for motivated young people to help their efforts; if supported, these organisations could offer even more to communities. There are, however, imbalances in supply and demand. There are also obstacles to the availability of resources, to ensuring quality and to various legal aspects.

In the absence of measures to bring organisations and young people together to promote solidarity, there is a risk that a major potential for solidarity activities goes untapped. This could result in an unnecessary welfare loss to organisations, young people and society as a whole. Furthermore, as the ex ante and previous evaluations of Erasmus+ and the EU Aid Volunteers show, there is room for improvement by simplifying processes and gains to be made from greater efficiencies derived from economies of scale and scope.

Against this background, the European Solidarity Corps aims to strengthen the engagement of young people and organisations in accessible and high-quality solidarity activities. The Corps is a means to help strengthen cohesion, solidarity and democracy in Europe and abroad and to address societal and humanitarian challenges on the ground, with a particular focus on promoting social inclusion.

To reach this general objective, the European Solidarity Corps will provide young people with easily accessible opportunities to engage in volunteering, traineeships or jobs in solidarity-related sectors, such as the social economy, and to devise and develop solidarity projects at their own initiative. The latter will also contribute to young people’s personal, social and professional development, as well as their employability, by improving their skills and competences. The Corps will also support networking activities for its participants and organisations. These aim to foster a European Solidarity Corps ‘spirit’ and a sense of belonging to a wider community committed to solidarity, as well as to encourage the exchange of useful practices and experience. The Corps also aims to ensure that:

·the solidarity activities offered to young participants help to address concrete societal challenges and needs-based humanitarian aid operations, and help to strengthen communities; and

·the learning outcomes resulting from young people’s participation in such activities are properly validated.

This proposal provides for a date of application as of 1 January 2021 and is presented for a Union of 27 Member States, in line with the notification by the United Kingdom of its intention to withdraw from the European Union and Euratom based on Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union received by the European Council on 29 March 2017.

Consistency with existing policy provisions

The European Solidarity Corps draws on the rich and long-standing tradition and experience of Member States in activities that serve the public interest, e.g. through volunteering. Some Member States operate national civic service programmes offering young people the possibility to engage, while others facilitate activities undertaken by civil society.

At EU level, the European Voluntary Service has provided volunteering opportunities for young people for 20 years. Policies and programmes such as the Youth Guarantee and the ‘Your First EURES Job’ initiative are helping young people get into traineeships and jobs. The EU Aid Volunteers initiative, launched in 2014, offers individuals the opportunity to get volunteering experience in a non-EU country. Such experience helps provide humanitarian aid where it is needed most.

These initiatives provide a solid basis which the European Solidarity Corps is not only building on but will also expand to offer new opportunities, wider visibility and greater impact. The Corps will offer new opportunities in the field of humanitarian aid that will no longer be supported by the EU Aid Volunteers initiative (which will end in 2020), while simplifying access for both interested young people and organisations. The Corps will continue offering a single, easily accessible entry point through its portal, and will aim at the widest possible outreach to participating organisations and the young people involved. It will also develop and improve the training available before an activity, as well as relevant support and the validation of learning outcomes after an activity.

To ensure efficient and effective implementation, the European Solidarity Corps will make maximum use of management arrangements already in place. This will allow it to focus on maximising delivery and performance while minimising administrative burdens. For this reason, implementation of the Corps will be entrusted to existing structures.

Consistency with other Union policies

The actions of the European Solidarity Corps are consistent with and complementary to a variety of relevant EU policies and programmes. These include, in particular, those relating to:

·education and training;

·employment;

·gender equality;

·entrepreneurship (in particular social entrepreneurship);

·citizenship and democratic participation;

·environment and nature protection;

·climate action;

·disaster prevention, preparedness and recovery;

·agriculture and rural development;

·provision of food and non-food items;

·health and well-being;

·creativity and culture;

·physical education and sport;

·social assistance and welfare;

·reception and integration of third country nationals;

·territorial cooperation and cohesion;

·cooperation across borders; and

·humanitarian aid.

In the first and second phase of the European Solidarity Corps a number of different EU programmes were mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the EU.

This proposal would constitute the background of a third phase of the European Solidarity Corps where its own well-defined envelope will allow all activities to be developed under the same set of rules and conditions for solidarity activities independently of the policy field addressed by the action. Since the new extended scope includes activities in support of humanitarian aid operations, the European Solidarity Corps will benefit from additional contributions for the support of the new scope of activities. The implementation of these activities will be done in close coordination with the relevant services within the Commission.

The Commission proposal for the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework set a more ambitious goal for climate mainstreaming across all EU programmes, with an overall target of 25% of EU expenditure contributing to climate objectives 4 . The contribution of this programme to the achievement of this overall target will be tracked through an EU climate marker system at an appropriate level of disaggregation, including the use of more precise methodologies where these are available. The Commission will continue to present the information annually in terms of commitment appropriations in the context of the annual draft budget.

To support the full utilisation of the potential of the programme to contribute to climate objectives, the Commission will seek to identify relevant actions throughout the programme preparation, implementation, review and evaluation processes.

2.LEGAL BASIS, SUBSIDIARITY AND PROPORTIONALITY

Legal basis

This proposal is based on two strands: ‘participation of young people in solidarity activities addressing societal challenges’ and ‘European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps’.

Consequently, the proposal is based on Articles 165(4), 166(4) and 214(5) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. Article 165(4) allows EU action aimed at ‘encouraging the development of youth exchanges (…) and encouraging participation of young people in democratic life in Europe’. EU action based on Article 166(4) represents an appropriate legal basis for an act such as this proposal that aims to ‘improve initial and continuing vocational training in order to facilitate vocational integration and reintegration into the labour market’ and ‘facilitate access to vocational training and encourage mobility of instructors and trainees and particularly young people’. Article 214(5) provides the legal basis for the establishment of ‘a framework for joint contributions from young Europeans to the humanitarian aid operations of the Union, a European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps’.

Subsidiarity (for non-exclusive competence)

Given the European scale of the proposed objectives — to mobilise young people for solidarity causes throughout the EU and young volunteers to contribute to humanitarian aid in non-EU countries — action at EU level is appropriate.

Action through the European Solidarity Corps will not replace similar actions for young people by Member States but will serve to complement and support them, in full respect of the subsidiarity principle. There are traditions in all Member States of running programmes and instruments supporting activities that serve the public interest, in particular through volunteering, which are quite diverse. Some countries’ practice foresees State intervention, whereas in others civil society takes the lead. There are also different concepts and connotations of solidarity activities and volunteering, and the types of activities are different in content and duration. Moreover, there are different perceptions of how social protection relates to volunteering, as well as various degrees of legal status, learning and recognition. All this leads to fragmentation at EU level, which means that young people across the EU have uneven access to the opportunities on offer.

EU action through the European Solidarity Corps helps overcome this fragmentation, as shown by the ex ante evaluation that accompanies this proposal. At the same time, it builds on the lessons learnt from the variety of experiences across Member States. It also boosts volunteering in Member States where it is less prevalent today, as suggested by the stakeholders who were consulted during the preparation of the [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] 5 . The Corps helps improve the quality of various activities for young people both within the EU and abroad, as well as the validation of their learning outcomes. It does so by applying a number of quality safeguards such as a quality label for participating organisations and the principles outlined in the Quality Framework for Traineeships 6 .

Furthermore, by extending the scope to cover activities in support of humanitarian aid operations, the European Solidarity Corps will offer a single entry point to high-quality volunteering and occupational solidarity activities for young people across the EU and abroad. Currently these are only accessible via two distinct schemes. The Corps will therefore ensure that all interested young people across the EU have equal opportunities to a broader variety of activities, and that they have easier access to them. Bringing the volunteering opportunities that support humanitarian aid under the existing European Solidarity Corps brand will also help improve awareness of the opportunities available to young people and give them greater visibility.

The European Solidarity Corps will offer both activities that can be undertaken in a country other than the country of residence of the participants (cross-border activities and volunteering in support of humanitarian aid) and activities that can be undertaken in their country of residence (in-country). On cross-border activities, action by individual Member States cannot replace EU action. This is due to the fragmentation in structures and programmes offering volunteering and traineeships, and to the diversity in the understanding and concepts of the sector offering solidarity activities. As far as in-country activities are concerned, the European Solidarity Corps helps address local or national challenges from a broader European perspective. In particular, EU action can help overcome fragmentation in the offer of activities and ensure inclusiveness for all young people, including those who face obstacles to engaging in international activities. It also provides a European context and helps in finding European solutions to specific challenges that are not confined to national borders.

Last but not least, the use of existing structures that have proved their worth helps ensure that the European Solidarity Corps is implemented effectively and efficiently. It also ensures that synergies and complementarities with Member Statesactions in favour of youth and humanitarian aid are maximised. Indeed, while national frameworks could achieve similar results, they would do so at double the cost, as the mid-term evaluation of the Erasmus+ programme (2014-2020) 7 found.

Proportionality

The improvements proposed will be integrated in the existing programme architecture and use the existing delivery mechanisms to ensure maximum continuity and stability with the predecessor programmes. The proposal addresses the gaps identified in the offer available to young people of easily accessible opportunities to engage in solidarity activities. It does not go beyond what is necessary to achieve its objectives.

Choice of the instrument

The proposed instrument is a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council.

3.RESULTS OF RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATIONS, STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATIONS AND IMPACT ASSESSMENTS

Retrospective evaluations/fitness checks of existing legislation

The EU Aid Volunteers initiative underwent a mid-term evaluation 8 of its implementation covering mid-2014 to mid-2017. The evaluation provided useful analyses of and insights into the implementation of the initiative, including shortcomings and areas for further improvement. In particular, its low intake of volunteers must be highlighted, as their original target may not be achieved. From the external evaluation report 9 several recommendations can be highlighted. For instance, the report recommended the use of single branding and communication activities, which would increase the visibility of activities in support of humanitarian aid operations. Another recommendation mentioned the possibility of moving from a vacancy-based application (as used in the EU Aid Volunteers initiative) towards a roster type of recruitment (as used in the European Solidarity Corps). Finally, the evaluation also highlighted the importance of further simplifying procedures, which would be achieved by aligning the process to the existing processes in the European Solidarity Corps.

In addition, since the European Solidarity Corps is heavily based on the previous European Voluntary Service, which was implemented under Erasmus+, the Erasmus+ mid-term evaluation 10 provides valuable insights. The main results highlight the effectiveness of Erasmus+ in developing skills and competences; its undisputable European added value; a high degree of coherence, in particular due to the pooling of programmes and the single brand name; and its efficiency and simplicity, underscoring the cost-effectiveness of mobility actions and the reduced management cost (less than half of similar national schemes).

These results reinforce the idea that extending the scope of the Corps to include activities currently implemented by the EU Aid Volunteers initiative would translate into efficiency gains, a clearer brand and positioning, and a greater number of opportunities for young people.

Stakeholder consultations

A recent public consultation on EU funds in the area of values and mobility 11 provides some information and analysis which is relevant for both the EU Aid Volunteers initiative and the current European Solidarity Corps. The response to the consultation was quite high, with 1 839 individual respondents, of which 1 199 represented an organisation. While no detailed analysis has yet been provided on the results, some preliminary observations can be made. For instance, over 75 % of respondents believe that promoting solidarity, social inclusion and skills development through mobility is important. However, fewer than 40 % of respondents believe that these issues are either fully or well addressed. Nonetheless, respondents clearly see the added value of EU action in this sector: over 75 % believe that the current programmes add value compared to what Member States could achieve nationally, regionally and/or locally.

Of the respondents, 135 responded regarding the EU Aid Volunteers and/or the European Solidarity Corps. Of these, 82 % believe that the lack of budget to satisfy demand is one of the main obstacles preventing the current programmes from achieving their objectives at least to some extent. Also, linked to the simplification sought by integrating them, it must be highlighted that over 68 % of respondents believe that simplifying forms and grant selection processes would help to improve the results of the programmes.

Impact assessment

An impact assessment has not been carried out as the content of this proposal is consistent with the existing European Solidarity Corps. Given that the proposal will involve significant spending, however, it is accompanied by an ex ante evaluation to fulfil the requirements in the Financial Regulation 12 .

The evaluation examined challenges that may appear because of the expansion of the scope of activities and the geographical scope, as well as those identified in implementing the current European Solidarity Corps and the EU Aid Volunteers. The evaluation indicated a need for the EU to address the following major challenges under an extended European Solidarity Corps.

·Communications: under the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps there has been some confusion among potential participants about its role. This especially concerns the underlying programmes that are part of phase 1 and the differences from the EU Aid Volunteers initiative;

·Coherence: the two most visible EU volunteering schemes are separated;

·Slow uptake of occupational activities: the traineeship and job activities being offered are fewer than anticipated;

·Cooperating with national schemes: the cooperation with national frameworks, initiatives and schemes, such as civic service programmes or privately run initiatives, should be increased to avoid possible overlapping of programmes;

·The inter-generational dimension: there is a disconnection between former, current and future participants. This translates into lost expertise that is not transmitted from one generation of participants to the next;

·Community building: the skills gained through the European Solidarity Corps experience should not benefit only the projects already finished but should rather be shared among young people and beyond. The Corps is missing out on that knowledge and sharing of experiences;

·Establishing a knowledge management system: from data collection to identification and dissemination of best practices in project management, the programme will need to better address this issue in order to increase the quality of reporting of results;

·Simplifying the process and procedures governing the programme: improving access to e-forms and simplifying them would increase the offers by organisations. Challenges could arise from a complex Regulation or set of legislative acts that lack flexibility to adapt to the changing needs of the programme;

·Deploying volunteers to humanitarian aid activities: one of the main challenges is the lengthy delay between the time candidates sign up and when they are deployed.

All these challenges are further explained in the evaluation accompanying this proposal. These challenges are addressed by this Regulation.

Simplification

This proposal introduces several simplifications, in three broad categories.

·For individuals: extending the scope would mean that all volunteering and other solidarity-related activities are under one same programme. This will greatly simplify the access to opportunities for young people wanting to engage in a solidarity activity;

·For organisations: aligning all rules of the programme, from application for accreditation to reporting requirements at the end of the project, will clearly simplify the work of the participating organisations at all stages of the project cycle. Also, the number of calls for proposals would be decreased, which would reduce the organisations’ workload;

·At institutional level: integrating activities currently implemented by the EU Aid Volunteers into the European Solidarity Corps will help simplify the work required for each element of the programme. For instance, one call for tender will be required instead of two for the insurance. Another example is the evaluation of proposals received at both national and centralised level, which would be combined while also catering for the specific features of each activity.

In addition, further simplifications of existing procedures are considered. A good example is the electronic forms that organisations need to fill in to apply for funds or the quality label. These forms are constantly being simplified, requiring less work by organisations while at the same time remaining guarantees of the high quality of activities being offered.

Fundamental rights

This proposal is fully in line with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU 13 , which acknowledges that solidarity is one of the universal values on which the EU is founded. In particular, this proposal takes into full account the rights and prohibitions laid down in the following articles of the Charter:

·5 (Prohibition of slavery and forced labour);

·14 (Right to education);

·15 (Freedom to choose an occupation and right to engage in work);

·21 (Non-discrimination);

·23 (Equality between women and men);

·24 (The rights of the child);

·26 (Integration of persons with disabilities);

·31 (Fair and just working conditions); and

·32 (Prohibition of child labour and protection of young people at work).

Furthermore, the extension of the scope to include support to humanitarian aid operations in non-EU countries will help to deliver assistance, relief and protection activities on a non-discriminatory basis in these countries. In addition, some activities might be aimed at supporting vulnerable groups in non-EU countries civil society organisations working on migration related matters or provision of food and non-food items in the aftermath of a natural disaster. In any case, regardless of their aim, activities in support of humanitarian aid would further promote EU values, including the protection of fundamental rights, in the communities where the activities take place.

4.BUDGETARY IMPLICATIONS

In line with the Commissions proposal for the Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, the financial allocation for implementing the programme for that period will be set at EUR 1 260 000 000 at current prices 14 .

Further details of the budgetary implications and the human and administrative resources required are provided in the Legislative and Financial Statement attached to this proposal.

5.OTHER ELEMENTS

Implementation plans and monitoring, evaluation and reporting arrangements

The European Solidarity Corps will use the management and implementation arrangements already in place under the Erasmus+ programme. Doing so is in line with the analysis carried out in the ex ante evaluation that accompanies this proposal. It will also ensure efficient and effective implementation, maximise synergies and minimise administrative burdens.

The monitoring and evaluation arrangements for the European Solidarity Corps will consist of permanent monitoring to assess progress and an evaluation to assess the evidence available on the effectiveness of the results achieved.

Monitoring arrangements will be based on an extensive analysis of the quantitative outputs and qualitative outcomes of the Corps. The quantitative outputs will be systematically collected through the IT systems put in place to manage the actions of the Corps. The qualitative outcomes will be monitored through periodic surveys targeting both individuals and participating organisations. The reporting and assessment arrangements by all implementing bodies will ensure comprehensive monitoring of the implementation of the proposal.

The programme will also be subject to an independent evaluation 4 years after the date of its adoption in order to assess the qualitative outcomes of the actions supported. This will include their impact on the young people and organisations involved, as well as the gains in efficiency observed over the first 4 years. The evaluation should take into account the existing evidence of the effectiveness and impact of the results of the Corps. The sources of verification will include the monitoring data, the information included in the work plans and reports from the implementing bodies, results arising from dissemination, evidence-based studies, surveys, etc.

Evaluations will be carried out in line with paragraphs 22 and 23 of the Interinstitutional Agreement of 13 April 2016 15 , where the three institutions confirmed that evaluations of existing legislation and policy should provide the basis for impact assessments of options for further action. The evaluations will assess the programme's effects on the ground based on the programme indicators/targets and a detailed analysis of the degree to which the programme can be deemed relevant, effective, efficient, provides enough EU added value and is coherent with other EU policies. They will include lessons learnt to identify any lacks/problems or any potential to further improve the actions or their results and to help maximise their exploitation/impact.

Detailed explanation of the specific provisions of the proposal

Chapter I — ‘General provisions’ of the proposed Regulation sets out its subject matter, the definitions of certain recurring terms and the general and specific objectives of the activities of the European Solidarity Corps. The Corps aims to strengthen the engagement of young people and organisations in solidarity activities of high quality, accessible to all young people. It is a means to contribute to strengthening cohesion and solidarity in Europe and abroad, supporting communities and responding to societal and humanitarian challenges.

Chapter II — ‘Actions of the European Solidarity Corps’ describes the activities envisaged in order to achieve the objectives of the proposed Regulation. EU support measures include volunteering, traineeships and jobs, projects and networking activities, which are separated into two strands, and quality and support measures, which are common to both strands.

Chapter III — ‘Participation of young people in solidarity activities addressing societal challenges’ describes the actions to be implemented under the first strand. This includes volunteering, traineeship and job activities, as well as solidarity projects.

Chapter IV — ‘European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps’ describes the actions to be implemented under the second strand, which consists only of volunteering activities.

Chapter V — ‘Financial provisions’ details the budget allocated to the programme.

Chapter VI — ‘Participation in the European Solidarity Corps’ specifies criteria for the participating countries, individuals and organisations. The participating countries are the EU Member States, non-EU countries associated to the programme and third countries not associated to the programme. Young people aged 17-30 can register on the European Solidarity Corps Portal but they can start participating only when they reach 18. A participating organisation that may make offers of solidarity activities to registered individuals is any public or private entity, or an international organisation that carries out solidarity activities, provided that they have received a quality label.

Chapter VII — ‘Programming, monitoring and evaluation’ specifies the requirements in these areas and provides a list of three indicators to be monitored.

Chapter VIII — ‘Information, communication and dissemination’ sets out the requirements regarding communications.

Chapter IX — ‘Management and audit system’ sets out the implementing bodies of the European Solidarity Corps. In management terms, the proposed implementation method is a combination of indirect management and direct management. The combination of management modes is based on the positive experience with implementing the Erasmus+ programme and builds on the existing structures of that programme.

Chapter X — ‘Control system’ sets out the necessary supervisory system to ensure that the protection of the EU’s financial interests is duly taken into account when actions financed under the European Solidarity Corps Regulation are implemented.

Chapter XI — ‘Complementarity’ highlights the consistency and complementarity requirements with regards other policies and programmes of the Union. Specific rules are also foreseen to allow for complementarities between the Programme and the European Structural and Investment Funds.

Chapter XII — ‘Transitional and final provisions’ sets out the necessary provisions for conferring certain powers on the Commission to adopt work programmes by way of implementing acts and sets out the proposed Regulation’s date of entry into force. It shall be binding in its entirety and directly applicable in all Member States from 1 January 2021.



Proposal for a

REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

establishing the European Solidarity Corps programme and repealing [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] and Regulation (EU) No 375/2014

(Text with EEA relevance)

THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, and in particular Articles 165(4), 166(4) and 214(5) thereof,

Having regard to the proposal from the European Commission,

After transmission of the draft legislative act to the national parliaments,

Having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee 16 ,

Having regard to the opinion of the Committee of the Regions 17 ,

Acting in accordance with the ordinary legislative,

Whereas:

(1)The European Union is built on solidarity, among its citizens and among its Member States. This common value guides its actions and provides the necessary unity to cope with current and future societal challenges, which young Europeans are willing to help address by expressing their solidarity in practice.

(2)The State of the Union address of 14 September 2016 emphasised the need to invest in young people and announced the establishment of a European Solidarity Corps (the ‘Programme’) with a view to creating opportunities for young people across the Union to make a meaningful contribution to society, show solidarity and develop their skills, thus getting not only work but also invaluable human experience.

(3)In its Communication ‘A European Solidarity Corps’ of 7 December 2016 18 , the Commission emphasised the need to strengthen the foundations for solidarity work across Europe, to provide young people with more and better opportunities for solidarity activities covering a broad range of areas, and to support national and local actors, in their efforts to cope with different challenges and crises. The Communication launched a first phase of the European Solidarity Corps whereby different Union programmes were mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the Union.

(4)Article 2 of the Treaty of the European Union highlights solidarity as one of the principles key to the European Union. That principle is also referred to in Article 21(1) of the Treaty of the European Union as one of the foundations of the EU’s external action.

(5)Young people should be provided with easily accessible opportunities to engage in solidarity activities, which could enable them to express their commitment to the benefit of communities while acquiring useful experience, skills and competences for their personal, educational, social, civic and professional development, thereby improving their employability. Those activities should also support the mobility of young volunteers, trainees and workers.

(6)The solidarity activities offered to young people should be of high quality, in the sense that they should respond to unmet societal needs, contribute to strengthening communities, offer young people the opportunity to acquire valuable knowledge and competences, be financially accessible to young people, and be implemented in safe and healthy conditions.

(7)The European Solidarity Corps provides a single entry point for solidarity activities throughout the Union and beyond. Consistency and complementarity should be ensured with other relevant Union policies and programmes. The European Solidarity Corps is built on the strengths and synergies of predecessor and existing programmes, notably the European Voluntary Service 19 and the EU Aid Volunteers 20 . It also complements the efforts made by Member States to support young people and ease their school-to-work transition under the Youth Guarantee by providing them with additional opportunities to make a start on the labour market in the form of traineeships or jobs in solidarity-related areas within their respective Member State or across borders. Complementarity with existing Union level networks pertinent to the activities under the European Solidarity Corps, such as the European Network of Public Employment Services, EURES and the Eurodesk network, are also ensured. Furthermore, complementarity between existing related schemes, in particular national solidarity schemes and mobility schemes for young people, and the European Solidarity Corps should be ensured, building on good practices where appropriate.

(8)With respect to the interpretation of related legislation at Union level, both the cross-border volunteering activities under the European Solidarity Corps and the volunteering activities that continue to be supported under Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 should be considered equivalent to those carried out under the European Voluntary Service.

(9)The European Solidarity Corps opens up new opportunities for young people to carry out volunteering, traineeship or job activities in solidarity-related areas as well as to devise and develop solidarity projects based on their own initiative. These opportunities contribute to enhancing their personal, educational, social, civic and professional development. The European Solidarity Corps also supports networking activities for European Solidarity Corps participants and organisations as well as measures to ensure the quality of the supported activities and to enhance the validation of their learning outcomes. It will thus also contribute to European cooperation relevant to young people and raising awareness of its positive impact.

(10)These activities should be to the benefit of communities while also fostering the individual’s personal, educational, social, civic and professional development, which may take the form of volunteering, traineeships and jobs, projects or networking activities, developed in relation to different areas, such as education and training, employment, gender equality, entrepreneurshipin particular social entrepreneurship,citizenship and democratic participation, environment and nature protection, climate action, disaster prevention, preparedness and recovery, agriculture and rural development, provision of food and non-food items, health and wellbeing, creativity and culture, physical education and sport, social assistance and welfare, reception and integration of third-country nationals, territorial cooperation and cohesion, and cooperation across borders. Such solidarity activities should include a solid learning and training dimension through relevant activities that can be offered to participants before, during and after the solidarity activity.

(11)Volunteering activities (both within and beyond the Union) constitute a rich experience in a non-formal and informal learning context which enhances young people’s personal, socio-educational and professional development, active citizenship and employability. Volunteering activities should not have an adverse effect on potential or existing paid employment, nor should they be seen as a substitute for it. The Commission and the Member States should cooperate regarding volunteering policies in the youth field via the open method of coordination.

(12)Traineeships and jobs in solidarity-related areas can offer additional opportunities for young people to make a start on the labour market while contributing to addressing key societal challenges. This can help foster the employability and productivity of young people while easing their transition from education to employment, which is key to enhancing their chances on the labour market. The traineeship activities offered under the European Solidarity Corps follow the quality principles outlined in Council Recommendation on establishing a Quality Framework for Traineeships 21 . The traineeships and jobs offered constitute a stepping stone for young people to enter the labour market and are accompanied by adequate post-activity support. The traineeship and job activities are facilitated by relevant labour market actors, in particular public and private employment services, social partners and Chambers of Commerce, and are remunerated by the participating organisation. As participating organisations, they should apply for funding via the competent implementing body of the European Solidarity Corps in view of intermediating between the young participants and employers offering traineeship and job activities in solidarity sectors.

(13)Young people’s spirit of initiative is an important asset for society and for the labour market. The European Solidarity Corps contributes to fostering this aspect by offering young people the opportunity to devise and implement their own projects aimed at addressing specific challenges to the benefit of their local communities. These projects are an opportunity to try out ideas and support young people to be themselves drivers of solidarity actions. They also serve as a springboard for further engagement in solidarity activities and are a first step towards encouraging European Solidarity Corps participants to engage in self-employment or setting up associations, non-governmental organisations or other bodies active in the solidarity, non-profit and youth sectors.

(14)Young people and organisations participating in the European Solidarity Corps should feel that they belong to a community of individuals and entities committed to enhancing solidarity across Europe. At the same time, participating organisations need support to strengthen their capacities to offer good quality activities to an increasing number of participants. The European Solidarity Corps supports networking activities aimed at strengthening young people and participating organisations’ engagement in this community, at fostering a European Solidarity Corps spirit, as well as at encouraging the exchange of useful practices and experience. These activities also contribute to raising awareness about the European Solidarity Corps among public and private actors as well as to collect feedback from participants and participating organisations on the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps.

(15)Particular attention should be given to ensuring the quality of the activities and other opportunities offered under the European Solidarity Corps, in particular by offering training, language support, insurance, administrative and post-activity support to participants as well as the validation of the knowledge, skills and competences acquired through their European Solidarity Corps experience. Security and safety of the volunteers remain of paramount importance and volunteers should not be deployed to operations conducted in the theatre of international and non-international armed conflicts.

(16)To ensure the impact of European Solidarity Corps activities on the personal, educational, social, civic and professional development of the participants, the knowledge, skills and competences that are the learning outcomes of the activity should be properly identified and documented, in accordance with national circumstances and specificities, as recommended in Council Recommendation of 20 December 2012 on the validation of non-formal and informal learning 22 .

(17)A quality label should ensure compliance of the participating organisations with the principles and requirements of the European Solidarity Corps, as regards their rights and responsibilities during all stages of the solidarity experience. Obtaining a quality label is a precondition for participation but should not automatically lead to funding under the European Solidarity Corps.

(18)Any entity willing to participate in the European Solidarity Corps should receive a quality label provided that the appropriate conditions are fulfilled. The process that leads to the attribution of a quality label should be carried out on a continuous basis by the implementing bodies of the European Solidarity Corps. The attributed quality label should be reassessed periodically and could be revoked if, in the context of the checks to be performed, the conditions that led to its attribution were found to be no longer fulfilled.

(19)An entity willing to apply for funding to offer activities under the European Solidarity Corps should have first received a quality label as a precondition. This requirement does not apply to natural persons seeking financial support on behalf of an informal group of European Solidarity Corps participants for their solidarity projects.

(20)Participating organisations may perform several functions in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps. In a host function they will carry out activities related to receiving the participants, including the organisation of activities and providing guidance and support to participants during the solidarity activity, as appropriate. In a support function they will carry out activities in relation to the sending and the preparation of participants before departure, during and after the solidarity activity, including training and guiding participants to local organisations after the activity.

(21)The scaling-up of European Solidarity Corps projects should be facilitated. Specific measures should be put in place to help promoters of European Solidarity Corps projects to apply for grants or develop synergies through the support of the European Structural and Investment Funds and the programmes relating to migration, security, justice and citizenship, health and culture.

(22)European Solidarity Corps Resource Centres should assist the implementing bodies, the participating organisations and the young people taking part in the European Solidarity Corps in order to raise the quality of the implementation of the activities of the European Solidarity Corps as well as to enhance the identification and validation of competences acquired through these activities including through producing Youthpass certificates.

(23)The European Solidarity Corps Portal should be continuously developed in order to ensure easy access to the European Solidarity Corps and to provide a one-stop shop for both interested individuals and organisations as regards, inter alia, registration, identification and matching of profiles and opportunities, networking and virtual exchanges, online training, language and post-activity support as well as other useful functionalities, which may arise in the future.

(24)The European Solidarity Corps Portal should be further developed taking into account the European Interoperability Framework 23 , which gives specific guidance on how to set up interoperable digital public services and is implemented in the Member States and other member of the European Economic Area through National Interoperability Frameworks. It offers public administrations 47 concrete recommendations on how to improve governance of their interoperability activities, establish cross-organisational relationships, streamline processes supporting end-to-end digital services, and ensure that both existing and new legislation do not compromise interoperability efforts.

(25)Regulation [the new Financial Regulation]  24 (the ‘Financial Regulation’) applies to this Programme. It lays down rules on the implementation of the Union budget, including the rules on grants, prizes, procurement, indirect implementation, financial assistance, financial instruments and budgetary guarantees.

(26)In particular, in accordance with Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council 25 and Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 26 , the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) may carry out administrative investigations, including on-the-spot checks and inspections, with a view to establishing whether there has been fraud, corruption or any other illegal activity affecting the financial interests of the Union. In accordance with Council Regulation (EU) 2017/1939 27 , the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO) may investigate and prosecute fraud and other criminal offences affecting the financial interests of the Union as provided for in Directive (EU) 2017/1371 of the European Parliament and of the Council 28 . In accordance with the Financial Regulation, any person or entity receiving Union funds is to fully cooperate in the protection of the Union’s financial interests, to grant the necessary rights and access to the Commission, OLAF, the EPPO and the European Court of Auditors (ECA) and to ensure that any third parties involved in the implementation of Union funds grant equivalent rights.

(27)The European Solidarity Corps targets young people aged 18-30, and participation in the activities offered by the European Solidarity Corps should require prior registration in the European Solidarity Corps Portal.

(28)Special attention should be given to ensuring that the activities supported by the European Solidarity Corps are accessible to all young people, notably the most disadvantaged ones. Special measures should be in place to promote social inclusion, the participation of disadvantaged young people, as well as to take into account the constraints imposed by the remoteness of a number of rural areas and of the outermost regions of the Union and the Overseas Countries and Territories. Similarly, the participating countries should endeavour to adopt all appropriate measures to remove legal and administrative obstacles to the proper functioning of the European Solidarity Corps. This should resolve, where possible, and without prejudice to the Schengen acquis and Union law on the entry and residence of third-country nationals, administrative issues that create difficulties in obtaining visas and residence permits, as well as the issuing of a European Health Insurance Card in the case of cross-border activities within the European Union.

(29)Reflecting the importance of tackling climate change in line with the Union's commitments to implement the Paris Agreement and achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, this Programme will contribute to mainstream climate action and to the achievement of an overall target of 25 % of the Union budget expenditures supporting climate objectives. Relevant actions will be identified during the Programme's preparation and implementation, and reassessed in the context of the relevant evaluations and review processes.

(30)This Regulation lays down a financial envelope for the period 2021-2027 which is to constitute the prime reference amount, within the meaning of Point 17 of the Interinstitutional Agreement between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management, for the European Parliament and the Council during the annual budgetary procedure 29 .

(31)The types of financing and the methods of implementation under this Regulation shall be chosen on the basis of their ability to achieve the specific objectives of the actions and to deliver results, taking into account, in particular, the costs of controls, the administrative burden, and the expected risk of non-compliance. For grants, this shall include consideration of the use of lump sums, flat rates and scales of unit costs.

(32)Third countries which are members of the European Economic Area (EEA) may participate in the Programme in the framework of the cooperation established under the European Economic Area (EEA) agreement, which provides for the implementation of Union programmes by a decision under that agreement. Third countries may also participate on the basis of other legal instruments. This Regulation should grant the necessary rights for and access to the authorising officer responsible, the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) as well as the European Court of Auditors to comprehensively exert their respective competences. The full participation of third countries in the Programme should be subject to the conditions laid down in specific agreements covering the participation of the third country concerned to the Programme. Full participation entails, moreover, the obligation to set up a national agency and managing some of the actions of the Programme at decentralised level. Individuals and entities from third countries that are not associated to the Programme should be able to participate in some of the actions of the Programme, as defined in the work programme and the calls for proposals published by the Commission.

(33)In order to maximise the impact of the European Solidarity Corps, provisions should be made to allow participating countries and other Union programmes to make additional funding available in accordance with the rules of the European Solidarity Corps.

(34)Pursuant to [Article 88 of New Council Decision on association of OCTs] 30 , persons and entities established in overseas countries and territories are eligible for funding subject to the rules and objectives of the Programme and possible arrangements applicable to the Member State to which the relevant overseas country or territory is linked.

(35)In line with the Commission's communication on 'A stronger and renewed strategic partnership with the Union's outermost regions' 31 , the Programme should take into account the specific situation of these regions. Measures will be taken to increase the outermost regions' participation in all actions. Such measures will be monitored regularly and evaluated.

(36)In compliance with the Financial Regulation, the Commission should adopt work programmes and inform the European Parliament and the Council thereof. The work programme should set out the measures needed for their implementation in line with the general and specific objectives of the Programme, the selection and award criteria for grants, as well as all other elements required. Work programmes and any amendments to them should be adopted by implementing acts in accordance with the examination procedure.

(37)Pursuant to paragraph 22 and 23 of the Interinstitutional agreement for Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016, there is a need to evaluate this Programme on the basis of information collected through specific monitoring requirements, while avoiding overregulation and administrative burdens, in particular on Member States. Such requirements should include specific, measurable and realistic indicators which can be measured over time as a basis for evaluating the effects of the Programme on the ground.

(38)Appropriate outreach, publicity and dissemination of the opportunities and results of the actions supported by the Programme should be ensured at European, national and local level. Special attention should be paid to social enterprises encouraging them to support the European Solidarity Corps activities. The outreach, publicity and dissemination activities should rely on all the implementing bodies of the Programme, including, when relevant, with the support of other key stakeholders.

(39)In order to better achieve the objectives of the Programme, the Commission, Member States and national agencies should preferably work closely together in partnership with non-governmental organisations, youth organisations and local stakeholders having expertise in solidarity actions.

(40)In order to ensure greater efficiency in communication to the public at large and stronger synergies between the communication activities undertaken at the initiative of the Commission, the resources allocated to communication under this Regulation should also contribute to covering the corporate communication of the political priorities of the Union, provided that these are related to the general objective of this Regulation.

(41)In order to ensure efficient and effective implementation of this Regulation, the Programme should make maximum use of existing management arrangements already in place. The implementation of the Programme should therefore be entrusted to existing structures, namely the Commission and the national agencies designated for the management of the actions referred to in Chapter III of [New Erasmus Regulation]. The Commission should regularly consult key stakeholders, including participating organisations, on the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps.

(42)In order to ensure sound financial management and legal certainty in each participating country, each national authority should designate an independent audit body. Where feasible, and in order to maximise efficiency, the independent audit body could be the same as the one designated for the actions referred to in Chapter III of [New Erasmus Regulation].

(43)Member States should endeavour to adopt all appropriate measures to remove legal and administrative obstacles to the proper functioning of the Programme. This includes resolving, where possible, and without prejudice to Union law on the entry and residence of third-country nationals issues that create difficulties in obtaining visas and residence permits. In line with Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and of the Council 32 , Member States are encouraged to establish fast-track admission procedures.

(44)The performance reporting system should ensure that data for monitoring programme implementation and evaluation are collected efficiently, effectively and in a timely manner, and at the appropriate level of granularity. Such data should be communicated to the Commission in a way that complies with relevant data protection rules.

(45)In order to ensure uniform conditions for the implementation of this Regulation, implementing powers should be conferred on the Commission. Those powers should be exercised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council 33 .

(46)In order to simplify requirements for beneficiaries, simplified grants in the form of lump-sums, unit-costs and flat-rate funding should be used to the maximum possible extent. The simplified grants to support the mobility actions of the Programme, as defined by the Commission, should take into account the living and subsistence costs of the host country. In accordance with national law, Member States should also be encouraged to exempt those grants from any taxes and social levies. The same exemption should apply to public or private entities awarding such financial support to the individuals concerned.

(47)In accordance with the Financial Regulation, Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2988/95 34 , Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 and Council Regulation (EU) 2017/1939, the financial interests of the Union are to be protected through proportionate measures, including the prevention, detection, correction and investigation of irregularities, including fraud, the recovery of funds lost, wrongly paid or incorrectly used and, where appropriate, the imposition of administrative sanctions. In order to review and/or complement the performance indicators of the Programme, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union should be delegated to the Commission. It is of particular importance that the Commission carries out appropriate consultations during its preparatory work, including at expert level, and that those consultations be conducted in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016. In particular, to ensure equal participation in the preparation of delegated acts, the European Parliament and the Council should receive all documents at the same time as Member States' experts, and their experts systematically have access to meetings of Commission expert groups dealing with the preparation of delegated acts.

(48)This Regulation respects the fundamental rights and observes the principles recognised in particular by the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union 35 . In particular, this Regulation seeks to ensure full respect for the right to equality between men and women and the right to non-discrimination based on sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation, and to promote the application of Articles 21 and 23 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

(49)Horizontal financial rules adopted by the European Parliament and the Council on the basis of Article 322 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union apply to this Regulation. These rules are laid down in the Financial Regulation and determine in particular the procedure for establishing and implementing the budget through grants, procurement, prizes, indirect implementation, and provide for checks on the responsibility of financial actors. Rules adopted on the basis of Article 322 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union also concern the protection of the Union's budget in case of generalised deficiencies as regards the rule of law in the Member States, as the respect for the rule of law is an essential precondition for sound financial management and effective Union funding.

(50)Since the objective of this Regulation, namely to enhance the engagement of young people and organisations in accessible and high-quality solidarity activities, cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States but can rather, by reason of its scale and effects, be better achieved at Union level, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality, as set out in that Article, this Regulation does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve those objectives.

(51)[European Solidarity Corps Regulation] should be repealed with effect from 1 January 2021.

(52)In order to ensure continuity in the funding support provided under the Programme, this Regulation should apply from 1 January 2021.

HAVE ADOPTED THIS REGULATION:

CHAPTER I

GENERAL PROVISIONS

Article 1

Subject matter

This Regulation establishes the European Solidarity Corps (the ‘Programme’).

It lays down the objectives of the Programme, the budget for the period 2021 – 2027, the forms of Union funding and the rules for providing such funding.

Article 2

Definitions

For the purposes of this Regulation, the following definitions apply:

(1)‘solidarity activity’ means a high-quality temporary activity contributing to the achievement of the objectives of the European Solidarity Corps, which may take the form of volunteering, traineeships, jobs, solidarity projects and networking activities in various fields, including those referred to in paragraph 13, ensuring the European added value and compliance with health and safety regulations;

(2)‘registered candidate’ means an individual aged between 17 and 30 years and who has registered in the European Solidarity Corps Portal to express the interest to engage in a solidarity activity but is not yet participating in such activity;

(3)‘participant’ means an individual aged between 18 and 30 years, who has registered in the European Solidarity Corps Portal and takes part in a solidarity activity under the European Solidarity Corps;

(4)‘young people with fewer opportunities’ means young people facing some obstacles that prevent them from having effective access to opportunities under the Programme for economic, social, cultural, geographical or health reasons or for reasons such as disabilities and educational difficulties;

(5)‘participating organisation’ means any public or private entity, whether local, regional, national or international, that has been attributed the European Solidarity Corps quality label;

(6)‘volunteering’ means a solidarity activity taking place as voluntary unpaid activity for a period of up to 12 months;

(7)‘traineeship’ means a solidarity activity for a period from two to six months, renewable once and for a maximum duration of 12 months, that is offered and paid by the participating organisation hosting the European Solidarity Corps participant;

(8)‘job’ means a solidarity activity for a period from 2 to 12 months, paid by the participating organisation employing the European Solidarity Corps participant;

(9)‘solidarity project’ means an unpaid in-country solidarity activity for a period of up to 12 months, carried out by groups of at least five European Solidarity Corps participants, with a view to addressing key challenges within their communities while presenting a clear European added value;

(10)‘quality label’ means the certification attributed to a participating organisation willing to provide solidarity activities under the European Solidarity Corps, in the role of a host and/or in a support function;

(11)‘European Solidarity Corps Resource Centres means the additional functions performed by designated national agencies to support the development, implementation and quality of activities under the European Solidarity Corps as well as the identification of the competences acquired by the participants through their solidarity activities;

(12)Union transparency and recognition tools means instruments that help stakeholders to understand, appreciate and, as appropriate, recognise non-formal and informal learning outcomes throughout the Union. All participants will receive, after completion of their activities, a certification stating the learning outcomes of, and skills developed during their activities, such as Youthpass or Europass;

(13)‘humanitarian aid activity’ means an activity supporting humanitarian aid operations in third countries intended to provide needs-based emergency assistance aimed at preserving life, preventing and alleviating human suffering, and maintaining human dignity in the face of man-made crises or natural disasters, including assistance, relief and protection operations in humanitarian crises or their immediate aftermath, supporting measures to ensure access to people in need and to facilitate the free flow of assistance, as well as actions aimed at reinforcing disaster preparedness and disaster risk reduction, linking relief, rehabilitation and development, and contributing towards strengthening resilience and capacity to cope with, and recover from crises;

(14)‘third country’ means a country that is not member of the Union;

(15)‘third country associated to the programme’ means a third country which is party to an agreement with the Union allowing for its participation in the Programme and which fulfils all the obligations laid down in this Regulation in relation to Member States;

(16)‘third country not associated to the programme’ means a third country which does not participate fully in the Programme but whose legal entities may exceptionally benefit from the Programme in duly justified cases in the Union’s interest.

Article 3

Programme objectives

1.The general objective of the Programme is to enhance the engagement of young people and organisations in accessible and high-quality solidarity activities as a means to contribute to strengthening cohesion, solidarity and democracy in the Union and abroad, addressing societal and humanitarian challenges on the ground, with particular effort to promote social inclusion.

2.The specific objective of the Programme is to provide young people, including those with fewer opportunities, with easily accessible opportunities for engagement in solidarity activities in Europe and abroad while improving and properly validating their competences as well as facilitating their employability and transition into the labour market.

3.The objectives of the Programme shall be implemented under the following strands of actions:

(a)participation of young people in solidarity activities addressing societal challenges, as referred to in Article 6;

(b)participation of young people in humanitarian aid related solidarity activities (European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps) as referred to in Article 10.

CHAPTER II

ACTIONS OF THE EUROPEAN SOLIDARITY CORPS

Article 4

Actions of the European Solidarity Corps

1.The Programme shall pursue the objectives set out in Article 3 through the following types of actions:

(a)volunteering, as referred to in Articles 7 and 11;

(b)traineeships and jobs, as referred to in Article 8;

(c)solidarity projects, as referred to in Article 9;

(d)networking activities, as referred to in Article 5;

(e)quality and support measures, as referred to in Article 5.

2.The Programme shall support the solidarity activities which present a clear European added value, for example through:

(a)their transnational character, particularly with regard to learning mobility and cooperation;

(b)their ability to complement with other programmes and policies at local, regional, national, Union and international level;

(c)their European dimension regarding the topics, aims, approaches, expected outcomes and other aspects of these solidarity activities;

(d)their approach to involve young people from different backgrounds;

(e)their contribution to the effective use of Union transparency and recognition tools.

3.The solidarity activities shall be implemented in accordance with specific requirements set for each type of activity carried out in the framework of the Programme as referred to in Articles 5, 7, 8, 9 and 11, as well as with applicable regulatory frameworks in participating countries.

4.References to the European Voluntary Service in the Union legislation shall be read as including volunteering activities under both Regulation 1288/2013 and this Regulation.

Article 5

Actions common to both strands

1.Networking activities, as referred to in Article 4.1, point (d), shall aim at:

(a)reinforcing the capacities of the participating organisations to offer good quality projects to an increasing number of European Solidarity Corps participants;

(b)attracting newcomers, both young people and participating organisations;

(c)providing opportunities to give feedback on solidarity activities; and

(d)contributing to exchange of experiences and strengthening the sense of belonging among the individuals and entities participating in the European Solidarity Corps and thus support its wider positive impact.

2.Quality and support measures, as referred to in Article 4.1, point (e), shall include:

(a)measures aimed at ensuring the quality of volunteering, traineeships or jobs, including training, language support, complementary insurance, support before or after the solidarity activity as well as the further use of Youthpass that identifies and documents the competences acquired during the solidarity activities for participants, and capacity building and, administrative support for participating organisations;

(b)the development and maintenance of a quality label for entities willing to provide solidarity activities for the European Solidarity Corps;

(c)the activities of European Solidarity Corps Resource Centres to support and raise the quality of the implementation of the actions of the European Solidarity Corps and enhance the validation of their outcomes;

(d)the establishment, maintenance and updating of the European Solidarity Corps Portal and other relevant online services as well as the necessary IT support systems and web-based tools.

CHAPTER III

PARTICIPATION OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN SOLIDARITY ACTIVITIES ADDRESSING SOCIETAL CHALLENGES

Article 6

Purpose and types of actions

1.Actions implemented under the strand ‘Participation of young people in solidarity activities addressing societal challenges’ shall in particular contribute to strengthening cohesion, solidarity and democracy in the Union and abroad, while also responding to societal challenges with particular effort to promote social inclusion.

2.The strand shall support activities as referred to in Article 4.1, in points (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e) in the following ways:

(a)volunteering, as referred to in Article 7;

(b)traineeships and jobs, as referred to in Article 8;

(c)solidarity projects, as referred to in Article 9;

(d)networking activities for individuals and organisations participating in this strand in accordance with Article 5;

(e)quality and support measures in accordance with Article 5.

Article 7

Volunteering in solidarity activities

1.Volunteering as referred to in Article 4.1, point (a) shall include a learning and training component, shall not substitute traineeships or jobs, shall not be equated with employment and shall be based on a written volunteering agreement.

2.Volunteering may take place in a country other than the country of residence of the participant (cross-border) or in the country of residence of the participant (in-country).

Article 8

Traineeships and jobs

1.A traineeship as referred to in Article 4.1, point (b) shall be based on a written traineeship agreement in accordance with the applicable regulatory framework of the country where the traineeship takes place, as appropriate, and taking into account the principles of the Quality Framework for Traineeships (2014/C 88/01). Traineeships shall not substitute jobs.

2.A job as referred to in Article 4.1, point (b) shall be based on an employment contract in accordance with the national regulatory framework of the participating country where the job is being carried out. The financial support to participating organisations offering jobs shall not exceed 12 months in cases when the duration of the employment contract exceeds 12 months.

3.Traineeships and jobs shall include a learning and training component.

4.Traineeships and jobs may take place in a country other than the country of residence of the participant (cross-border) or in the country of residence of the participant (in-country).

Article 9

Solidarity projects

A solidarity project as referred to in Article 4.1, point (c) shall not substitute traineeships and/or jobs.

CHAPTER IV

EUROPEAN VOLUNTARY HUMANITARIAN AID CORPS

Article 10

Purpose and types of actions

1.Actions implemented under the strand ‘European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps’ shall in particular contribute to providing needs-based humanitarian aid aimed at preserving life, preventing and alleviating human suffering and maintaining human dignity and to strengthening the capacity and resilience of vulnerable or disaster-affected communities.

2.The actions under this Chapter shall be carried out in compliance with the humanitarian aid principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence.

3.The strand shall support activities as referred to in Article 4.1, in points (a), (d), and (e) in the following ways:

(a)volunteering, as referred to in Article 11;

(b)networking activities for individuals and organisations participating in this strand in accordance with Article 5;

(c)quality and support measures in accordance with Article 5 with particular focus on measures to ensure safety and security of participants.

Article 11

Volunteering in support of humanitarian aid operations

1.Volunteering in support of humanitarian aid operations as referred to in Article 4.1, point (a) shall include a learning and training component, shall not substitute traineeships or jobs and shall be based on a written volunteering agreement.

2.Volunteering under this strand may only take place in third countries:

(a)where humanitarian aid activities and operations take place; and

(b)where there are no ongoing international or non-international armed conflicts.

CHAPTER V

FINANCIAL PROVISIONS

Article 12

Budget

1.The financial envelope for the implementation of the Programme for the period 2021-2027 shall be EUR 1 260 000 000 in current prices.

2.The amount referred to in paragraph 1 may be used for technical and administrative assistance for the implementation of the Programme, such as preparatory, monitoring, control, audit and evaluation activities, including corporate information technology systems.

3.Without prejudice to the Financial Regulation, expenditure for actions resulting from projects included in the first work programme may be eligible as from 1 January 2021.

4.Resources allocated to Member States under shared management may, at their request, be transferred to the Programme. The Commission shall implement those resources directly in accordance with [point (a) of Article 62.1] of the Financial Regulation or indirectly in accordance with [point (c) of that Article]. Where possible those resources shall be used for the benefit of the Member State concerned.

Article 13

Forms of EU funding and methods of implementation

1.The Programme shall be implemented in a consistent manner in direct management in accordance with the Financial Regulation and in indirect management with bodies referred to in Article [62.1, point (c)] of the Financial Regulation.

2.The Programme may provide funding in any of the forms laid down in the Financial Regulation, in particular grants, prizes and procurement.

3.Contributions to a mutual insurance mechanism may cover the risk associated with the recovery of funds due by recipients and shall be considered a sufficient guarantee under the Financial Regulation. The provisions laid down in [Article X of] Regulation XXX [successor of the Regulation on the Guarantee Fund] shall apply.

4.For selections under both direct and indirect management, the evaluation committee may be composed of external experts.

CHAPTER VI

PARTICIPATION IN THE EUROPEAN SOLIDARITY CORPS

Article 14

Participating countries

1.Volunteering, traineeships, jobs, solidarity projects, networking activities and quality and support measures as referred to in Articles 5, 7, 8, 9 and 11 shall be open to the participation of the Member States and overseas countries and territories.

2.Volunteering, networking activities and quality and support measures as referred to in Articles 5 and 7 shall also be open to the participation of:

(a)members of the European Free Trade Association, which are members of the European Economic Area (EEA), in accordance with the conditions laid down in the European Economic Area agreement;

(b)acceding countries, candidates and potential candidates, in accordance with the general principles and general terms and conditions for the participation of those countries in Union programmes established in the respective framework agreements and Association Council decisions, or similar agreements, and in accordance with the specific conditions laid down in agreements between the Union and those countries;

(c)countries covered by the European Neighbourhood Policy, in accordance with the general principles and general terms and conditions for the participation of those countries in Union programmes established in the respective framework agreements and Association Council decisions, or similar agreements, and in accordance with the specific conditions laid down in agreements between the Union and those countries;

(d)other third countries, in accordance with the conditions laid down in a specific agreement covering the participation of the third country to any Union programme, provided that the agreement:

ensures a fair balance as regards the contributions and benefits of the third country participating in the Union programmes;

lays down the conditions of participation in the programmes, including the calculation of financial contributions to individual programmes and their administrative costs. These contributions shall constitute assigned revenues in accordance with Article [21(5)] of the Financial Regulation;

does not confer to the third country a decisional power on the programme;

guarantees the rights of the Union to ensure sound financial management and to protect its financial interests.

3.The countries referred to in paragraph 2 shall fully take part in the Programme only insofar as they fulfil all the obligations which this Regulation imposes on Member States.

4.Volunteering and networking actions as referred to in Articles 5 and 7 may be open to participation of any third country not associated to the programme, in particular neighbourhood countries.

Article 15

Participation of individuals

Young people aged 17 to 30 years willing to participate in the European Solidarity Corps shall register in the European Solidarity Corps Portal. However, at the moment of commencing volunteering, traineeship, job or a solidarity project a young person shall be at least 18 years of age and not older than 30.

Article 16

Participating organisations

1.The European Solidarity Corps shall be open to the participation of public or private entities and international organisations, provided that they have received a European Solidarity Corps quality label.

2.An application from an entity to become a European Solidarity Corps participating organisation shall be assessed by the competent implementing body of the European Solidarity Corps on the basis of the principles of equal treatment; equal opportunities and non-discrimination; avoidance of job substitution; provision of high quality activities with learning dimension focusing on personal, socio-educational and professional development; adequate training, working and volunteering arrangements; safe and decent environment and conditions; and the 'no-profit principle' in compliance with the Financial Regulation. The above principles ascertain whether its activities meet the requirements of the European Solidarity Corps.

3.As a result of the assessment the entity may be attributed the European Solidarity Corps quality label. The obtained label shall be re-assessed periodically and may be revoked.

4.Any entity which has received the European Solidarity Corps quality label shall be given access to the European Solidarity Corps Portal in the role of a host function, in a support function, or both, and shall be able to make offers for solidarity activities to registered candidates.

5.The European Solidarity Corps quality label shall not automatically lead to funding under the European Solidarity Corps.

6.The solidarity activities and related quality and support measures offered by a participating organisation may receive funding under the European Solidarity Corps or from other funding sources which do not depend on the Union budget.

7.For organisations participating in the context of activities as referred to in Article 11 the safety and security of volunteers shall be a priority.

Article 17

Access to the European Solidarity Corps funding

Any public or private entity established in a participating country as well as international organisations may apply for funding under the European Solidarity Corps. In the case of the activities referred to in Articles 7, 8 and 11, a quality label shall be obtained by the participating organisation as a pre-condition for receiving funding under the European Solidarity Corps. In the case of the solidarity projects referred to Article 9, natural persons may also apply for funding on behalf of informal groups of European Solidarity Corps participants.

CHAPTER VII

PROGRAMMING, MONITORING AND EVALUATION

Article 18

Work programme

The Programme shall be implemented by work programmes referred to in [Article 110] of the Financial Regulation. In addition, the work programme shall give an indication of the amount allocated to each action and of the distribution of funds between the Member States and third countries associated to the Programme for the actions to be managed through the national agency. The work programme shall be adopted by the Commission by means of an implementing act. Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 30.

Article 19

Monitoring and reporting

1.Indicators to report on the progress of the Programme towards the achievement of the general and specific objectives laid down in Article 3 are set out in the Annex.

2.To ensure effective assessment of the Programme towards the achievement of its objectives, the Commission shall be empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 29 to amend the Annex to review or complement the indicators, where considered necessary and to supplement this Regulation with provisions on the establishment of a monitoring and evaluation framework.

3.The performance reporting system shall ensure that data for monitoring Programme implementation and evaluation are collected efficiently, effectively, in a timely manner and at the appropriate level of detail by beneficiaries of Union funds within the meaning of Article [2.5] of the Financial Regulation. To that end, proportionate reporting requirements shall be imposed on beneficiaries of Union funds and Member States.

Article 20

Evaluation

1.Evaluations shall be carried out in a timely manner to feed into the decision-making process.

2.The interim evaluation of the Programme shall be performed once there is sufficient information available about the implementation of the Programme, but no later than four years after the start of the programme implementation. It shall also be accompanied by a final evaluation of the predecessor programme.

3.Without prejudice to the requirements set out in Chapter IX and the obligations of national agencies as referred to in Article 23, Member States shall submit to the Commission, by 30 April 2024, a report on the implementation and the impact of the Programme in their respective territories.

4.At the end of the implementation of the Programme, but no later than four years after the end of the period specified in Article 1, a final evaluation of the Programme shall be carried out by the Commission.

5.The Commission shall communicate the conclusions of the evaluations accompanied by its observations, to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions.

CHAPTER VIII

INFORMATION, COMMUNICATION AND DISSEMINATION

Article 21

Information, communication and dissemination

1.The recipients of Union funding shall acknowledge the origin and ensure the visibility of the Union funding, in particular when promoting the actions and their results, by providing coherent, effective and proportionate targeted information to multiple audiences, including the media and the public.

2.The Commission shall implement information and communication actions relating to the Programme, and its actions and results. Financial resources allocated to the Programme shall also contribute to the corporate communication of the political priorities of the Union, as far as they are related to the objectives referred to in Article 3.

3.The national agencies referred to in Article 23 shall develop a consistent strategy with regard to the effective outreach as well as dissemination and exploitation of results of activities supported under the actions they manage within the Programme, shall assist the Commission in its general task of disseminating information concerning the Programme, including information in respect of actions and activities managed at national and Union level, and its results, and shall inform relevant target groups about the actions and activities undertaken in their country.

CHAPTER IX

MANAGEMENT AND AUDIT SYSTEM

Article 22

National authority

In each country participating in the European Solidarity Corps, the national authorities designated for the management of actions referred to in Chapter III of [New Erasmus Regulation] shall also act as national authorities in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps. Paragraphs 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Article 23 of [New Erasmus Regulation] shall apply to the European Solidarity Corps by analogy.

Article 23

National agency

1.In each country participating in the European Solidarity Corps, the national agencies designated for the management of the actions referred to in Chapter III of [New Erasmus Regulation] in their respective countries shall also act as national agencies in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps.

Paragraphs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Article 24 of [New Erasmus Regulation] shall apply to the European Solidarity Corps by analogy.

2.Without prejudice to Article 24.2 of [New Erasmus Regulation], the national agency shall also be responsible for managing all stages of the project lifecycle of those actions of the European Solidarity Corps listed in the implementing acts referred to in Article 18, in accordance with points [(c)(v) and (vi) of Article 62.1] of the Financial Regulation.

3.For countries referred to in Article 14.2 of this Regulation, where a national agency is not designated for that country, it shall be established in accordance with paragraphs 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Article 24 of [New Erasmus Regulation].

Article 24

European Commission

1.The rules applying to the relationship between the Commission and a national agency shall be laid down, in accordance with the rules in Article 24 of [New Erasmus Regulation], in a written document which shall:

(a)lay down the internal control standards for the national agency concerned and the rules for the management of the Union funds for grant support by the national agencies;

(b)include the national agency work programme comprising the management tasks of the national agency to which Union support is provided;

(c)specify the reporting requirements for the national agency.

2.The Commission shall each year make the following funds available to the national agency:

(a)funds for grant support in the participating country concerned for the actions of the European Solidarity Corps the management of which is entrusted to the national agency;

(b)a financial contribution in support of the management tasks of the national agency defined in accordance with the modalities set out in point (b) of Article 25.3 of [New Erasmus Regulation].

3.The Commission shall lay down the requirements for the national agency work programme. The Commission shall not make European Solidarity Corps funds available to the national agency before having formally approved the national agency’s work programme.

4.On the basis of the compliance requirements for national agencies referred to in Article 23.3 of [New Erasmus Regulation], the Commission shall review the national management and control systems, the national agency’s management declaration and the opinion of the independent audit body thereon, taking due account of the information provided by the national authority on its monitoring and supervision activities with regard to the European Solidarity Corps.

5.After assessing the yearly management declaration and the opinion of the independent audit body thereon, the Commission shall address its opinion and observations to the national agency and the national authority.

Article 25

Audits

1.Audits on the use of the Union contribution carried out by persons or entities, including by others than those mandated by the Union Institutions or bodies, shall form the basis of the overall assurance pursuant to [Article 127] of the Financial Regulation.

2.The national authority shall designate an independent audit body. The independent audit body shall issue an audit opinion on the management declaration referred to in [Article 155.1] of the Financial Regulation.

3.The independent audit body shall:

(a)have the necessary professional competence to carry out public sector audits;

(b)ensure that its audits take account of internationally accepted audit standards; and

(c)not be in a position of conflict of interest with regard to the legal entity of which the national agency referred to in Article 23 forms part and be independent, in terms of its functions, of the legal entity of which the national agency forms part.

4.The independent audit body shall give the Commission and its representatives, as well as the Court of Auditors, full access to all documents and reports in support of the audit opinion that it issues on the national agency’s management declaration.

CHAPTER X

 CONTROL SYSTEM

Article 26

Principles of the control system

1.The Commission shall be responsible for the supervisory controls with regard to the European Solidarity Corps actions managed by the national agencies. It shall set the minimum requirements for the controls by the national agency and the independent audit body.

2.National agencies shall be responsible for the primary controls of grant beneficiaries for the actions of the European Solidarity Corps which are entrusted to them. Those controls shall give reasonable assurance that the grants awarded are used as intended and in compliance with the applicable Union rules.

3.With regard to the funds transferred to the national agencies, the Commission shall ensure proper coordination of its controls with the national authorities and the national agencies, on the basis of the single audit principle and following a risk-based analysis. This provision shall not apply to investigations carried out by the European Anti-Fraud Office (‘OLAF’).

Article 27

Protection of the financial interests of the Union

Where a third country participates in the programme by a decision under an international agreement or by virtue of any other legal instrument, the third country shall grant the necessary rights and access required for the authorizing officer responsible, the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), the European Court of Auditors to comprehensively exert their respective competences. In the case of OLAF, such rights shall include the right to carry out investigations, including on-the-spot checks and inspections, provided for in Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council concerning investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF).

CHAPTER XI

COMPLEMENTARITY

Article 28

Complementarity of Union action

1.The actions of the European Solidarity Corps shall be consistent with and complementary to the relevant policies, instruments and programmes at Union level, in particular the Erasmus programme, as well as to existing networks at Union level relevant to the activities of the European Solidarity Corps.

2.The actions of the European Solidarity Corps shall also be consistent with and complementary to the relevant policies, programmes and instruments at national level in the participating countries. To this end, the Commission, national authorities and national agencies shall exchange information on existing national schemes and priorities related to solidarity and youth, on the one hand, and actions under the European Solidarity Corps, on the other hand, with a view to build on relevant good practices and achieve efficiency and effectiveness.

3.The actions of the European Solidarity Corps in third countries referred to in Article 11 shall be in particular consistent with and complementary to other areas of Union external action, in particular humanitarian aid policy, development cooperation policy, enlargement policy, neighbourhood policy and the Union Civil Protection Mechanism.

4.An action that has received a contribution from the Programme may also receive a contribution from any other Union programme, provided that the contributions do not cover the same costs. The rules of each contributing Union programme shall apply to its respective contribution to the action. The cumulative funding shall not exceed the total eligible costs of the action and the support from the different Union programmes may be calculated on a pro-rata basis in accordance with the documents setting out the conditions for support.

5.Where the Programme and the European Structural and Investment (ESI) Funds referred to in Article 1 of [Regulation (EU)XX CPR] provide jointly financial support to a single action, that action shall be implemented in accordance with the rules set out in this Regulation, including rules on recovery of amounts unduly paid.

6.Actions eligible under the Programme which have been assessed in a call for proposals under the Programme and which comply with the minimum quality requirements of that call for proposals, but which are not financed due to budgetary constraints, may receive support from the European Regional Development Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Social Fund+ or the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, in accordance with paragraph 7 of Article [65] of Regulation (EU) XX [Common Provisions Regulation] and Article [8] or Regulation (EU) XX [Financing, management and monitoring of the Common Agricultural Policy], provided that such actions are consistent with the objectives of the programme concerned. The rules of the Fund providing support shall apply.

CHAPTER XII

TRANSITIONAL AND FINAL PROVISIONS

Article 29

Exercise of the delegation

1.The power to adopt delegated acts is conferred on the Commission subject to the conditions laid down in this Article.

2.The power to adopt delegated acts referred to in Article 19 shall be conferred on the Commission for the duration of the Programme.

3.The delegation of power referred to in Article 19 may be revoked at any time by the European Parliament or by the Council. A decision to revoke shall put an end to the delegation of the power specified in that decision. It shall take effect the day following the publication of the decision in the Official Journal of the European Union or at a later date specified therein. It shall not affect the validity of any delegated acts already in force.

4.Before adopting a delegated act, the Commission shall consult experts designated by each Member State in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016.

5.As soon as it adopts a delegated act, the Commission shall notify it simultaneously to the European Parliament and to the Council.

6.A delegated act adopted pursuant to Article 19 shall enter into force only if no objection has been expressed either by the European Parliament or the Council within a period of two months of notification of that act to the European Parliament and the Council or if, before the expiry of that period, the European Parliament and the Council have both informed the Commission that they will not object. That period shall be extended by two months at the initiative of the European Parliament or of the Council.

Article 30

Committee procedure

1.The Commission shall be assisted by a committee within the meaning of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011.

2.Where reference is made to this paragraph, Article 5 of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 shall apply.

Article 31

Repeal

Regulation (EU) [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] and Regulation (EU) No 375/2014 are repealed with effect from 1 January 2021.

Article 32

Transitional provisions

1.This Regulation shall not affect the continuation or modification of the actions concerned, until their closure, under [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] or under Regulation (EU) No 375/2014. Those Regulations shall continue to apply to those actions until their closure.

2.The financial envelope for the Programme may also cover technical and administrative assistance expenses necessary to ensure the transition between the Programme and the measures adopted under [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] or under Regulation (EU) No 375/2014.

3.If necessary, appropriations may be entered in the budget beyond 2027 to cover the expenses provided for in Article 12.2, to enable the management of actions and activities not completed by 31 December 2027.

4.Member States shall ensure at national level the unimpeded transition between the actions carried out in the context of the European Solidarity Corps Programme (2018-2020) and those to be implemented under this Programme.

Article 33

Entry into force

This Regulation shall enter into force on the [twentieth] day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

This Regulation shall be binding in its entirety and directly applicable in all Member States.

Done at Brussels,

For the European Parliament    For the Council

The President    The President



LEGISLATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENT

1.FRAMEWORK OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

1.1.Title of the proposal/initiative

1.2.Policy area(s) concerned (programme cluster)

1.3.Nature of the proposal/initiative

1.4.Grounds for the proposal/initiative

1.5.Duration and financial impact

1.6.Management mode(s) planned

2.MANAGEMENT MEASURES

2.1.Monitoring and reporting rules

2.2.Management and control system

2.3.Measures to prevent fraud and irregularities

3.ESTIMATED FINANCIAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

3.1.Heading(s) of the multiannual financial framework and expenditure budget line(s) affected

3.2.Estimated impact on expenditure

3.2.1.Summary of estimated impact on expenditure

3.2.2.Estimated impact on appropriations of an administrative nature

3.2.3.Third-party contributions

3.3.Estimated impact on revenue

LEGISLATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENT

1.FRAMEWORK OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

1.1.Title of the proposal/initiative

Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing the European Solidarity Corps programme.

1.2.Policy area(s) concerned (Programme cluster)

7. Investing in People, Social Cohesion and Values

1.3.The proposal/initiative relates to:

a new action

 a new action following a pilot project/preparatory action 36

the extension of an existing action

a merger or redirection of one or more actions towards another/a new action

1.4.Grounds for the proposal/initiative

1.4.1.Requirement(s) to be met in the short or long term including a detailed timeline for roll-out of the implementation of the initiative

To establish a Corps of motivated young Europeans willing to engage - in their country or abroad - in volunteering activities, traineeships or jobs in solidarity-related areas.

By 2027, the programme is expected to have offered opportunities to 350 000 young Europeans.

To support organisations in carrying out accessible and high quality solidarity activities that are expected to contribute to addressing unmet societal needs, while enhancing young people’s personal, educational, social, civic and professional development.

1.4.2.Added value of Union involvement (it may result from different factors, e.g. coordination gains, legal certainty, greater effectiveness or complementarities). For the purposes of this point 'added value of Union involvement' is the value resulting from Union intervention which is additional to the value that would have been otherwise created by Member States alone.

The European Solidarity Corps enhances the European dimension to solidarity. It will complement existing public and private policies, programmes and activities and this will not have competition or substitution effects. This complementary effect will be ensured since the Corps will address unmet societal needs, i.e. situations where needs among communities and citizens are – e.g. for reasons of lacking resources – not being met by the labour market or by existing volunteering or other types of solidarity programmes.

Furthermore, as explained in the ex-ante evaluation, the EU added value of the proposal comes from a common quality standard in the opportunities offered; from solidarity, seen as a common European value; economies of scale and scope, achieved through the integration of both programmes; and consistency, by integrating all solidarity-related opportunities for young people within one programme.

1.4.3.Lessons learned from similar experiences in the past

The European Solidarity Corps draws on the rich and long-standing tradition and experience of Member States in activities that serve the public interest, e.g. through volunteering. Some Member States operate national civic service programmes offering young people the possibility to engage, others facilitate activities undertaken by civil society.

At EU level, the European Voluntary Service (EVS) has provided volunteering opportunities for young people for 20 years, and policies and programmes such as the Youth Guarantee and the “Your First EURES Job” are helping young people get into traineeships and jobs. The EU Aid Volunteers initiative, launched in 2014, offers the opportunity to EU citizens to have a volunteering experience in a third country, supporting and contributing to the provision of humanitarian aid assistance where it is most needed.

The European Solidarity Corps builds on the strengths and experience of these initiatives, thus benefiting from building on a solid, existing basis while expanding it in order to offer new opportunities, wider visibility and greater impact. The European Solidarity Corps will offer new opportunities in the field of humanitarian aid that will no longer be supported by the EU Aid Volunteers initiative (which will not continue after 2020), while simplifying access for interested young people and organisations. The European Solidarity Corps will continue offering a single, easily accessible entry point through its Portal, and will aim at the widest possible outreach to participating organisations and to the young people involved. It will also develop and enhance training available before an activity, as well as relevant support and the validation of learning outcomes after an activity.

In order to ensure efficient and effective implementation, the European Solidarity Corps will make maximum use of existing management arrangements already in place. This will allow focusing on maximising delivery and performance while minimising administrative burden. For this reason, the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps will be entrusted to existing bodies, i.e. the European Commission, also through its Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA), and the national agencies designated for the management of the actions referred to in the Youth Chapter of [New Erasmus Regulation] establishing the Erasmus Programme.

1.4.4.Compatibility and possible synergy with other appropriate instruments

The actions of the European Solidarity Corps are consistent with and complementary to a variety of relevant EU policies and programmes, in particular, but not limited to, those relating to education and training, employment, gender equality, entrepreneurship (in particular social entrepreneurship), citizenship and democratic participation, environment and nature protection, climate action, disaster prevention, preparedness and recovery, agriculture and rural development, provision of food and non-food items, health and well-being, creativity and culture, physical education and sport, social assistance and welfare, reception and integration of third-country nationals, territorial cooperation and cohesion, cooperation across borders and humanitarian aid.

In the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps launched in December 2016, eight different EU programmes were mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the EU. These activities, whether implemented before or after the entry into force of the proposed Regulation, applied the rules and conditions set by the respective EU programmes that have financed them during the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps.

For the second phase starting with the entry into force of [European Solidarity Corps Regulation], several EU programmes will have contributed to the European Solidarity Corps. Some of them by means of contributions into the financial envelope of the European Solidarity Corps; others by supporting activities within its scope. These contributions are financed in accordance with the respective basic acts of the concerned programmes.

This proposal constitutes the background of a third phase of the European Solidarity Corps. Since the new extended scope includes activities in support of humanitarian aid operations, the European Solidarity Corps will benefit from additional contributions for the support of the new scope of activities. The implementation of these activities will be done in close coordination with the relevant services within the Commission.



1.5.Duration and financial impact

 limited duration

   in effect from 01/01/2021 to 31/12/2027

   Financial impact from 2021 to 2027 for commitment appropriations and from 2021 to 2032 for payment appropriations.

◻ unlimited duration

Implementation with a start-up period from YYYY to YYYY, followed by full-scale operation.

1.6.Management mode(s) planned 37

 Direct management by the Commission

by its departments, including by its staff in the Union delegations;

   by the executive agencies

 Shared management with the Member States

 Indirect management by entrusting budget implementation tasks to:

third countries or the bodies they have designated;

international organisations and their agencies (to be specified);

the EIB and the European Investment Fund;

bodies referred to in Articles 70 and 71 of the Financial Regulation;

public law bodies;

bodies governed by private law with a public service mission to the extent that they provide adequate financial guarantees;

bodies governed by the private law of a Member State that are entrusted with the implementation of a public-private partnership and that provide adequate financial guarantees;

persons entrusted with the implementation of specific actions in the CFSP pursuant to Title V of the TEU, and identified in the relevant basic act.

If more than one management mode is indicated, please provide details in the ‘Comments’ section.

Comments

The management of the main actions of the European Solidarity Corps will be conferred to the national agencies responsible for the implementation of decentralised actions under the Erasmus Programme. These bodies will be responsible for actions such as: quality label and training, volunteering, traineeships and jobs, solidarity projects, networking activities, and Resource Centres.

The European Commission, partially also via the Education, Audio-visual and Culture Executive Agency, will manage actions to provide horizontal services to the European Solidarity Corps participants (i.e. portal, online training, online linguistic support, insurance) as well as a part of actions, such as Quality label, solidarity activities (for certain profiles of organisations or types of activities) and Networking activities (for European level activities).

2.MANAGEMENT MEASURES

2.1.Monitoring and reporting rules

Specify frequency and conditions.

The monitoring and evaluation arrangements of the European Solidarity Corps will consist of permanent monitoring to assess progress and an evaluation to assess the existing evidence on the effectiveness of the results achieved.

Monitoring arrangements will be based on an extensive analysis of the quantitative outputs and qualitative outcomes of the European Solidarity Corps. The quantitative outputs will be systematically collected through the IT systems put in place for the management of the actions of the European Solidarity Corps. The qualitative outcomes will be monitored through periodical surveys targeting both individuals and participating organisations. The reporting and assessment arrangements by all implementing bodies will ensure a comprehensive monitoring of the implementation of the proposal.

The Programme will also be subject to an independent evaluation four years after the date of its adoption to assess the qualitative outcomes of the supported actions, including their impact on the young people and organisations, as well as the gains in efficiency observed throughout the first four years. The evaluation should take into account the existing evidence on the effectiveness and impact of the results of the European Solidarity Corps. The sources of verification will include the monitoring data, the information included in the work plans and reports from the implementing bodies, results arising from dissemination, evidence-based studies, surveys, etc.

2.2.Management and control system(s)

2.2.1.Justification of the management mode(s), the funding implementation mechanism(s), the payment modalities and the control strategy proposed

In line with the analysis carried out in the context of the ex-ante evaluation that accompanies this proposal, and in order to ensure efficient and effective implementation, synergies and to minimise administrative burden, the European Solidarity Corps will use the existing management and implementation arrangements already in place under the Erasmus+ programme. Building on the positive experience of the implementation of this programme as well as on its structures, the proposal provides for a clear division of programme management tasks between the Commission, the national agencies established under the Erasmus+ Programme and the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA). Since its founding in 2006, the EACEA has implemented parts of the Erasmus+, Creative Europe, Europe for Citizens and EU Aid Volunteers programmes (and their predecessor programmes), as confirmed by a number of independent external evaluations. EACEA is in the process of improving its procedures as a result of recommendations by the Internal Audit Service. In parallel, the successful model of national agencies under Erasmus+ has delivered demonstrable performance and efficiency, coupled with a high level of assurance and sound financial management.

2.2.2.Information concerning the risks identified and the internal control system(s) set up to mitigate them

The ex-ante evaluation identified six potential risks to be monitored:

-There are not enough young people registered in the database with necessary motivation for solidarity activities.

-Not enough offers from organisations or offers that do not match the interests of the young European Solidarity Corps participants.

-Involved organisations to commit fraud of irregularities with received funds.

-Fraud committed by participants leads to an increased cost of insurance overall.

-Rapidly changing environment in a third country renders the deployment of a volunteer dangerous.

-Dilution of humanitarian aid activities within the other European Solidarity Corps activities.

For each of these risks, an analysis was conducted to assess their probability and the effect they would have in the programme should they be realised. In addition, mitigating measures have been suggested in the ex-ante evaluation for each risk.

The control system for the initiative will be set up in a manner so as to ensure efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the controls. The Commission's supervision and performance frameworks will ensure a high level of monitoring and feedback to inform the policy approach.

2.2.3.Estimation and justification of the cost-effectiveness of the controls (ratio of "control costs ÷ value of the related funds managed"), and assessment of the expected levels of risk of error (at payment & at closure)

The Commission's estimate is that the global cost of control is low, and in the range 1-2%, depending on the measure used and of the budget managed (Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency's budget excluded). These costs are proportional and cost effective given the likely risk of error if such controls were not in place, and the requirement to ensure an error rate below 2%. Based on the experience with the current European Solidarity Corps and its predecessor programme the European Voluntary Service, the expected risk of error is less than 2%.

2.3.Measures to prevent fraud and irregularities

Specify existing or envisaged prevention and protection measures, e.g. from the Anti-Fraud Strategy.

The controls aimed at preventing and detecting fraud are not unlike those intended to ensure the legality and regularity of the transactions (the unintentional errors). Each year the Commission reviews all reporting from national agencies on possible fraud or irregularities. These cases are mainly followed up at national level where the national agencies have direct access to means of legal redress and referral of fraud cases.

The Commission services contribute to ongoing OLAF investigations and organise the follow-up to completed OLAF investigations. Financial prejudice to the EU budget resulting from fraud established in final OLAF case reports concerning programmes with similar funding rules and stakeholders is low. Cases are referred to OLAF and to IDOC as appropriate, but a significant number of cases are followed up during the year directly with national agencies and national authorities, who have direct access to the relevant judicial and anti-fraud entities.

Commission services implementing the action have developed and implemented their own anti-fraud strategy since 2014, elaborated on the basis of the methodology provided by OLAF. Regularly updated, it is supplemented with (most recently 2017), where appropriate, lower-level procedural documents, covering how cases are referred and followed up.

As concluded in the mid-term evaluation of the Erasmus+ programme, given the fact that the scale of fraud within the programme is extremely limited and is largely restricted to cases of multiple project application submissions or project leaders failing to honour their obligations, the measures in place are considered both appropriate and proportionate. Considering the level of fraud impact potentially faced by the proposed programme, in particular the financial prejudice recorded by the European Anti-fraud Office, the residual risk of fraud does not justify additional measures. Commission services maintain close cooperation with OLAF and follow the ongoing cases closely. Therefore it is possible to conclude positively on assurance in respect of fraud risk.

3.ESTIMATED FINANCIAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE 38

3.1.Heading of the multiannual financial framework and new expenditure budget line(s) proposed

Heading of multiannual financial framework

Budget line

Type of
expenditure

Contribution

Number
[…][Heading………………………...……………]

Diff./Non-diff.

from EFTA countries

from candidate countries

from third countries

within the meaning of Article [21(2)(b)] of the Financial Regulation

2

07 01 XX XX – Administrative support to European Solidarity Corps 

Non-diff.

YES

YES

YES/NO

YES/NO

2

07 04 01 – European Solidarity Corps

Diff

YES

YES

YES/NO

YES/NO

3.2.Estimated impact on expenditure

3.2.1.Summary of estimated impact on expenditure

EUR million (to three decimal places)

Heading of multiannual financial
framework

2

Cohesion & Values

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Post 2027

TOTAL

Operational appropriations

07 04 01 – European Solidarity Corps

Commitments

(1)

141.595

146.347

153.799

164.372

178.692

197.648

221.547

1,204.000

Payments

(2)

103.858

133.016

145.078

156.215

169.764

187.129

209.231

99.710

1,204.000

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of the programme

07 01 XX XX– Administrative support to European Solidarity Corps

Commitments = Payments

(3)

6.586

6.807

7.153

7.645

8.311

9.193

10.305

56.000

TOTAL appropriations for the envelope of the programme

Commitments

=1+3

148.181

153.154

160.952

172.017

187.003

206.841

231.852

1,260.000

Payments

=2+3

110.444

139.823

152.231

163.860

178.075

196.321

219.536

99.710

1,260.000

Heading of multiannual financial
framework

2

Cohesion & Values

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Post 2027

TOTAL

Operational appropriations

07 04 01 – European Solidarity Corps

Commitments

(1)

141.595

146.347

153.799

164.372

178.692

197.648

221.547

1,204.000

Payments

(2)

103.858

133.016

145.078

156.215

169.764

187.129

209.231

99.710

1,204.000

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of the programme

07 01 XX XX– Administrative support to European Solidarity Corps

Commitments = Payments

(3)

6.586

6.807

7.153

7.645

8.311

9.193

10.305

56.000

TOTAL appropriations for the envelope of the programme

Commitments

=1+3

148.181

153.154

160.952

172.017

187.003

206.841

231.852

1,260.000

Payments

=2+3

110.444

139.823

152.231

163.860

178.075

196.321

219.536

99.710

1,260.000



Heading of multiannual financial
framework

7

‘Administrative expenditure’

This section should be filled in using the 'budget data of an administrative nature' to be firstly introduced in the Annex to the Legislative Financial Statement , which is uploaded to DECIDE for interservice consultation purposes.

EUR million (to three decimal places)

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Post 2027

TOTAL

Human resources

2.505

2.505

2.579

2.579

2.579

2.579

2.579

17.905

Other administrative expenditure

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

5.866

TOTAL appropriations under HEADING 7 of the multiannual financial framework

3.343

3.343

3.417

3.417

3.417

3.417

3.417

23.771

EUR million (to three decimal places)

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Post 2027

TOTAL

TOTAL appropriations
across HEADINGS
of the multiannual financial framework 

Commitments

151.524

156.497

164.369

175.434

190.420

210.258

235.269

1,283.771

Payments

113.787

143.166

155.648

167.277

181.492

199.738

222.953

99.710

1,283.771

3.2.2.Summary of estimated impact on appropriations of an administrative nature

   The proposal/initiative does not require the use of appropriations of an administrative nature

   The proposal/initiative requires the use of appropriations of an administrative nature, as explained below:

EUR million (to three decimal places)

Years

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TOTAL

HEADING 7
of the multiannual financial framework

Human resources

2.505

2.505

2.579

2.579

2.579

2.579

2.579

17.905

Other administrative expenditure

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

0.838

5.866

Subtotal HEADING 7
of the multiannual financial framework

3.343

3.343

3.417

3.417

3.417

3.417

3.417

23.771

Outside HEADING 7
of the multiannual financial framework

Human resources

Other expenditure
of an administrative nature

6.586

6.807

7.153

7.645

8.311

9.193

10.305

56.000

Subtotal
outside HEADING 7
of the multiannual financial framework

6.586

6.807

7.153

7.645

8.311

9.193

10.305

56.000

TOTAL

9.929

10.150

10.570

11.062

11.728

12.610

13.722

79.771

The appropriations required for human resources and other expenditure of an administrative nature will be met by appropriations from the Directorate General that are already assigned to management of the action and/or have been redeployed within the Directorate General, together if necessary with any additional allocation which may be granted to the managing Directorate General under the annual allocation procedure and in the light of budgetary constraints.

3.2.2.1.Estimated requirements of human resources 39

   The proposal/initiative does not require the use of human resources.

   The proposal/initiative requires the use of human resources, as explained below:

Estimate to be expressed in full time equivalent units

Years

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

• Establishment plan posts (officials and temporary staff)

Headquarters and Commission’s Representation Offices

17

17

17

17

17

17

17

Delegations

Research

Financed from HEADING 7 of the multiannual financial framework 

- at Headquarters

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

- in Delegations

Financed from the envelope of the programme  40

- at Headquarters

- in Delegations

Research

Other (specify)

TOTAL

18

18

19

19

19

19

19

The human resources required will be met by staff from the DG who are already assigned to management of the action and/or have been redeployed within the DG, together if necessary with any additional allocation which may be granted to the managing DG under the annual allocation procedure and in the light of budgetary constraints.

Description of tasks to be carried out:

Officials and temporary staff

External staff

3.2.3.Third-party contributions

The proposal/initiative:

   does not provide for co-financing by third parties

   provides for the co-financing by third parties estimated below:

Appropriations in EUR million (to three decimal places)

Years

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

TOTAL

Specify the co-financing body 

TOTAL appropriations co-financed

3.3.Estimated impact on revenue

   The proposal/initiative has no financial impact on revenue.

   The proposal/initiative has the following financial impact:

   on own resources

   on other revenue

please indicate, if the revenue is assigned to expenditure lines    

EUR million (to three decimal places)

Budget revenue line:

Impact of the proposal/initiative

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

Article ………….

For assigned revenue, specify the budget expenditure line(s) affected.

[…]

Other remarks (e.g. method/formula used for calculating the impact on revenue or any other information).

[…]

(1)     http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2017/03/25-rome-declaration/ .
(2)    European Commission (2016), A European Solidarity Corps, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM(2016) 942 final of 7.12.2016.
(3)    The Erasmus+ programme, the Employment and Social Innovation programme (EaSI), the LIFE programme, the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund, the Health programme, the Europe for Citizens programme, the European Regional Development Fund (through Interreg) and the Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
(4)    Modern Budget for a Union that Protects, Empowers and Defends — The Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, COM(2018) 321 final.
(5)    [Pending reference to European Solidarity Corps 2018-2020].
(6)    Council Recommendation of 15 March 2018 on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships (OJ C 153, 2.5.2018, p. 1).
(7)    Mid-term evaluation of the Erasmus+ programme (2014-2020) (SWD(2018)40), 31 January 2018.
(8)    Mid-term evaluation of the EU Aid Volunteers, 2017.
(9)    Please note that the Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and to the Council as well as the Staff Working Document on the interim evaluation of the EU Aid Volunteers initiative has not been adopted yet. This part of the ex ante evaluation may be replaced by the text in the Report / SWD as soon as it is adopted.
(10)    Highlights and main documents can be found on the web page dedicated to the evaluations: https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/resources/documents.evaluations_en .
(11)    Final consolidated analysis is still pending.
(12)    [Pending reference to Financial Regulation].
(13)    EU Charter of Fundamental Rights (OJ C 326, 26.10.2012, p. 391).
(14)    Modern Budget for a Union that Protects, Empowers and Defends — The Multiannual Financial Framework for 2021-2027, COM(2018) 321 final, p. 29.
(15)    Interinstitutional Agreement between the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016 (OJ L 123, 12.5.2016, p. 1–14).
(16)    OJ C […], […], p. […].
(17)    OJ C […], […], p. […].
(18)    Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions A European Solidarity Corps (COM(2016) 942 final).
(19)    Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing 'Erasmus+': the Union programme for education, training, youth and sport and repealing Decisions No 1719/2006/EC, No 1720/2006/EC and No 1298/2008/EC (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 50–73).
(20)    Regulation (EU) No 375/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 3 April 2014 establishing the European Voluntary Humanitarian Aid Corps (‘EU Aid Volunteers initiative’) (OJ L 122, 24.4.2014, p. 1-17).
(21)    Council Recommendation of 15 March 2018 on a European Framework for Quality and Effective Apprenticeships (OJ C 153, 2.5.2018, p. 1).
(22)    Council Recommendation of 20 December 2012 on the validation of non-formal and informal learning (OJ C 398, 22.12.2012, p. 1–5).
(23)    Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions - European Interoperability Framework – Implementation Strategy (COM(2017) 134 final).
(24)    [Pending reference to Financial Regulation].
(25)    Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 883/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council of 11 September 2013 concerning investigations conducted by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) (OJ L 248, 18.9.2013, p. 1).
(26)    Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 of 11 November 1996 concerning on-the-spot checks and inspections carried out by the Commission in order to protect the European Communities' financial interests against fraud and other irregularities (OJ L 292, 15.11.1996, p. 2).
(27)    Council Regulation (EU) 2017/1939 of 12 October 2017 implementing enhanced cooperation on the establishment of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (‘the EPPO’) (OJ L 283, 31.10.2017, p. 1).
(28)    Directive (EU) 2017/1371 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 July 2017 on the fight against fraud to the Union’s financial interests by means of criminal law (OJ L 198, 28.7.2017, p. 29).
(29)    Interinstitutional Agreement between the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016 (OJ L 123, 12.5.2016, p. 1).
(30)    [Pending reference on New Council Decision on association of OCTs].
(31)    Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee, the Committee of the Regions and the European Investment bank on A stronger and renewed strategic partnership with the EU's outermost regions (COM(2017) 623 final).
(32)    Directive (EU) 2016/801 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 May 2016 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing (OJ L 132, 21.5.2016, p. 21).
(33)    Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 2011. Laying down the rules and general principles concerning mechanisms for control by Member States of the Commission's exercise of implementing powers (OJ L 55 28.2.2011 p.13).
(34)    Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 2988/95 of 18 December 1995 on the protection of the European Communities financial interests (OJ L 312, 23.12.95, p. 1).
(35)    EU Charter of Fundamental Rights (OJ C 326, 26.10.2012, p. 391).
(36)    As referred to in Article 58(2)(a) or (b) of the Financial Regulation.
(37)    Details of management modes and references to the Financial Regulation may be found on the BudgWeb site: https://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/budgweb/EN/man/budgmanag/Pages/budgmanag.aspx  
(38)    The programme might be (partially) delegated to an executive agency (EACEA), subject to the outcome of the cost-benefit analysis and related decisions to be taken, and that the related administrative appropriations for programme implementation in the Commission and the executive agency will be adapted accordingly.
(39)    The estimated requirements of human resources are purely based on the current situation DG EAC only and are subject to further revisions. Staff estimates based on 2018 level of staff in the Commission (Executive Agency excluded) with progressive phasing in.
(40)    Sub-ceiling for external staff covered by operational appropriations (former ‘BA’ lines).
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Brussels,11.6.2018

COM(2018) 440 final

ANNEX

to the

Proposal for a
REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

establishing the European Solidarity Corps programme and repealing [European Solidarity Corps Regulation] and Regulation (EU) No 375/2014

{SWD(2018) 317 final}
{SWD(2018) 318 final}
{SWD(2018) 319 final}


ANNEX

Indicators for monitoring and reporting:

(a)number of participants in solidarity activities;

(b)percentage of participants from a fewer opportunities background; and

(c)number of organisations holding a European Solidarity Corps Quality Label.

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