EUR-Lex Access to European Union law

Back to EUR-Lex homepage

This document is an excerpt from the EUR-Lex website

Document 32021R0584

Council Implementing Regulation (EU) 2021/584 of 12 April 2021 implementing Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 concerning restrictive measures directed against certain persons, entities and bodies in view of the situation in Iran

ST/6041/2021/INIT

OJ L 124I , 12.4.2021, p. 1–6 (BG, ES, CS, DA, DE, ET, EL, EN, FR, GA, HR, IT, LV, LT, HU, MT, NL, PL, PT, RO, SK, SL, FI, SV)

In force

ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/reg_impl/2021/584/oj

12.4.2021   

EN

Official Journal of the European Union

LI 124/1


COUNCIL IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2021/584

of 12 April 2021

implementing Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 concerning restrictive measures directed against certain persons, entities and bodies in view of the situation in Iran

THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

Having regard to Council Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 of 12 April 2011 concerning restrictive measures directed against certain persons, entities and bodies in view of the situation in Iran (1), and in particular Article 12(1) thereof,

Having regard to the proposal from the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy,

Whereas:

(1)

On 12 April 2011 the Council adopted Regulation (EU) No 359/2011.

(2)

On 8 December 2019 the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy issued a declaration on behalf of the Union deploring the widespread and disproportionate use of force by the Iranian security forces, which led to high numbers of deaths and injuries during the response to the November 2019 demonstrations. The declaration also spelled out that the Union expects all perpetrators of violence to be held accountable and called on the Iranian authorities to ensure transparent and credible investigations to clarify the number of deaths and arrested, and to provide due process to all detainees. Furthermore, in reaction to Iran’s decision to shut down internet access to global networks for over a week, preventing communication and the free flow of information for Iranian citizens, the declaration stressed that fundamental rights, such as freedom of expression and assembly, must always be respected.

(3)

In this context, and in line with the Union’s commitment to address all issues of concern with Iran, including the human rights situation, eight persons and three entities should be included in the list of natural and legal persons, entities and bodies subject to restrictive measures set out in Annex I to Regulation (EU) No 359/2011.

(4)

Annex I to Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 should therefore be amended accordingly,

HAS ADOPTED THIS REGULATION:

Article 1

Annex I to Regulation (EU) No 359/2011 is amended as set out in the Annex to this Regulation.

Article 2

This Regulation shall enter into force on the date of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

This Regulation shall be binding in its entirety and directly applicable in all Member States.

Done at Brussels, 12 April 2021.

For the Council

The President

A. P. ZACARIAS


(1)  OJ L 100, 14.4.2011, p. 1.


ANNEX

The following persons and entities are added to the list of natural and legal persons, entities and bodies set out in Annex I to Regulation (EU) No 359/2011:

 

Persons

 

Name

Identifying information

Reasons

Date of listing

‘88.

SOLEIMANI Gholamreza

POB: Farsan (Iran)

DOB: 1343 (Iranian Hijri calendar), 1964 or 1965 (Gregorian calendar)

Nationality: Iranian

Gender: male

Position: Head of the Basij Organisation of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC)

Gholamreza Soleimani is the Head of the Basij Organisation. The Basij Organisation used lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests in Iran, causing the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians in many cities across the country. As Head of the Basij Organisation, Gholamreza Soleimani bears responsibility for the violent suppression of the protests and serious human rights violations in Iran.

12.4.2021

89.

SALAMI Hossein (a.k.a. SALAMI Hussain)

POB: Vaneshan, Golpayegan (Iran)

DOB: 1339 (Iranian Hijri calendar) 1960 or 1961 (Gregorian calendar)

Nationality: Iranian

Gender: male

Position: Commander in Chief of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC)

Rank: Major General

Hossein Salami has been the Commander in Chief of the IRGC since April 2019, which includes the Basij militia, and is a member of the National Security Council. The IRGC’s regular forces and the Basij militia used lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests in Iran, causing the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians in many cities across the country. As a member of the National Security Council, Hossein Salami took part in the sessions that resulted in the orders to use lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests. Hossein Salami therefore bears responsibility for serious human rights violations in Iran.

12.4.2021

90.

KARAMI Hassan

Nationality: Iranian

Gender: male

Position: Commander of the Special Units of the Iranian police force

Hassan Karami is the Commander of the Special Units of the Iranian police force. The Special Units used lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests in Iran, causing the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians in many cities across the country. As the Commander of the Special Units, which have caused the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians, Hassan Karami bears responsibility for serious human rights violations in Iran.

12.4.2021

91.

PAKPOUR Mohammad (a.k.a. PAKPUR Mohammad)

POB: Arak (Iran)

DOB: 1340 (Iranian Hijri calendar), 1961 (Gregorian calendar)

Nationality: Iranian

Gender: male

Position: Commander in Chief of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) Ground Forces

Rank: Brigadier General

Mohammad Pakpour has been Commander in Chief of the IRGC Ground Forces since March 2010. The IRGC’s Ground Forces used lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests in Iran, causing the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians in many cities across the country. As Commander in Chief of the IRGC’s Ground Forces, which have used lethal force against unarmed protesters and other civilians, Mohammad Pakpour bears responsibility for serious human rights violations in Iran.

12.4.2021

92.

ASHTARI Hossein

POB: Isfahan (a.k.a. Esfahan, Ispahan)

Nationality: Iranian

Gender: male

Position: Commander in Chief of the Iranian police force

Hossein Ashtari has been the Commander in Chief of the Iranian police force since March 2015 and is a member of the National Security Council. The police force includes the Emdad Units and the Special Units. Iran’s ordinary police force, the Emdad Units and the Special Units used lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests in Iran, causing the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians in many cities across the country. As a member of the National Security Council, Hossein Ashtari took part in the sessions that resulted in the orders to use lethal force to suppress the November 2019 protests. Hossein Ashtari therefore bears responsibility for serious human rights violations in Iran.

12.4.2021

93.

ZIAEI Gholamreza

Gender: male

Position: Former Director of Evin Prison; former Director of other detention centres

Between July 2019 and June 2020, Gholamreza Ziaei was the Director of Evin Prison, where already harsh conditions for detainees further deteriorated during his tenure. Female prisoners were denied phone contact with their children. Political prisoners were denied weekly visits by relatives, which were only allowed every two months. During the 2009 protests, Ziaei was in charge of the Kahrizak Detention Center, where at least five detainees, who had been arrested in connection with Tehran’s 2009 mass street protests, died after being tortured. From 2017 to 2019, before taking charge of Evin Prison in Tehran, Ziaei was the director of Rajaee Shahr Prison in Karaj, west of Tehran, where there have been numerous protests by political prisoners against abuse and inhumane living conditions.

12.4.2021

94.

SHAHVARPOUR Hassan

POB: Safi Abad, south of Dezful, Khuzestan (Iran)

Gender: male

Passport number: 2001624001 (national ID number)

Position: Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) Commander of Khuzestan Province Vali Asr Corps

Rank: Brigadier General

As the Commander of the IRGC in Khuzestan since 2009, Hassan Shahvarpour is responsible for commanding the forces which used machine guns against protesters and other civilians in the city of Mahshahr during the November 2019 protests. Under his command, 148 people were killed by the IRGC by heavy machine gun fire from armoured vehicles encircling fleeing protesters hiding in nearby marshes.

12.4.2021

95.

VASEGHI Leyla (a.k.a. VASEQI Layla, VASEGHI Leila, VASEGHI Layla)

POB: Sari, Mazandaran Province (Iran)

DOB: 1352 (Iranian Hijri calendar), 1972 or 1973 (Gregorian calendar)

Gender: female

Position: Governor of Shahr-e Qods and Head of the City Security Council

As the governor of Shahr-e Qods and Head of the City Security Council since September 2019, Leyla Vaseghi ordered the police and other armed forces to use lethal means during the November 2019 protests, causing the deaths of and injuries to unarmed protesters and other civilians. As the governor of Shahr-e Qods and Head of the City Security Council, Leyla Vaseghi bears responsibility for serious human rights violations in Iran.

12.4.2021’

 

Entities

 

Name

Identifying information

Reasons

Date of listing

‘2.

Evin Prison

Address: Tehran Province, Tehran, District 2, Dasht-e Behesht (Iran)

Evin Prison is a detention centre where political prisoners have been held and severe human rights abuses, including torture, have repeatedly taken place over the past years and decades. November 2019 protesters were, and at least to some extent still are, detained in Evin Prison as political prisoners. Prisoners in Evin Prison are being deprived of basic procedural rights, and are sometimes held in solitary confinement or overcrowded cells with poor hygienic conditions. There are detailed reports of physical and psychological torture. Detainees are denied contact with family and lawyers as well as adequate health treatment.

12.4.2021

3.

Fashafouyeh Prison (a.k.a. Greater Tehran Central Penitentiary, Hasanabad-e Qom Prison, Greater Tehran Prison)

Address: Tehran Province, Hasanabad, Bijin Industrial Zone, Tehran, Qom Old Road (Iran)

Telephone: +98 21 5625 8050

Fashafouyeh Prison is a detention centre designated originally to detain offenders of drug-related crimes, recently also holding political prisoners and, in some cases, forcing them to share cells with drug addicts. The living and hygienic conditions are very poor, lacking basic needs like clean drinking water. During the November 2019 protests, several protesters were detained in Fashafouyeh Prison, including minors. Reports indicate that November 2019 protesters were subjected to torture and inhumane treatment at Fashafouyeh Prison, e.g. by deliberately wounding them with boiling water and through denial of medical treatment. According to an Amnesty International report on the crackdown of the November 2019 protests, children as young as 15 have been detained alongside adults in Fashafouyeh Prison. Three November 2019 protesters who are currently being held in Fashafouyeh Prison were sentenced to death by a court in Tehran.

12.4.2021

4.

Rajaee Shahr Prison (a.k.a. Rajai Shahr Prison, Rajaishahr, Raja’i Shahr, Reja’i Shahr, Rajayi Shahr, Gorhardasht Prison, Gohar Dasht Prison)

Address: Alborz Province, Karaj, Gohardasht, Moazzen Blvd (Iran)

Telephone: +98 26 3448 9826

Rajaee Shahr Prison has been known for the deprivation of human rights, including severe physical and psychological torture of political prisoners and prisoners of conscience as well as mass executions without fair trial, ever since the Islamic Revolution in 1979. Hundreds of detainees, including children, were severely mistreated in Rajaee Shahr Prison in the aftermath of the November 2019 protests. There are credible reports about numerous cases of torture and other forms of cruel punishment, including cases involving minors.

12.4.2021’


Top