Help Print this page 
Title and reference
Electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits

Summaries of EU legislation: direct access to the main summaries page.
Languages and formats available
BG ES CS DA DE ET EL EN FR GA HR IT LV LT HU MT NL PL PT RO SK SL FI SV
HTML html ES html DE html EN html FR html IT
Multilingual display
Text

Electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits

The rules relating to low-voltage electrical equipment in the European Union (EU) countries often differ, thus impeding the free movement of this equipment. This Directive therefore aims at further harmonisation of the safety requirements with which this equipment must comply in order to move freely in the internal market.

ACT

Directive 2006/95/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2006 on the harmonisation of the laws of Member States relating to electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits (codified version).

SUMMARY

This Directive aims at ensuring that electrical equipment may be placed on the market only if it does not, when installed and maintained, endanger the safety of persons, domestic animals or property, and at promoting the free movement of this equipment in the EU.

Scope

This Directive applies to electrical equipment designed for use with a voltage rating of between 50 and 1000 Volts for alternating current and between 75 and 1500 Volts for direct current.

It does not apply to:

electrical equipment for use in an explosive atmosphere;

equipment for radiology and medical purposes;

electrical parts for goods and passenger lifts;

electricity meters;

plugs and socket outlets for domestic use;

electric fence controllers;

radio-electrical interference;

electrical equipment for use on ships, aircraft or railways;

electrical equipment intended for export to third countries.

Safety objectives

Electrical equipment may be placed on the market if it complies with the safety objectives laid down in Annex I to this Directive concerning:

general safety conditions applying to equipment;

hazards arising from electrical equipment;

hazards caused by external influences on electrical equipment.

The free movement of electrical equipment must not be hindered if it meets the safety objectives defined in the Directive. Manufacturers may choose how they comply with safety objectives.

Presumption of conformity

Electrical equipment which complies with the provisions of the harmonised standards should be subject to a presumption of conformity with the safety objectives established by this Directive and be able to move freely.

Standards are regarded as harmonised if they are drawn up by common agreement between the bodies notified by the EU countries and published under national procedures. Their references must be published in the Official Journal of the European Union.

If standards have not yet been harmonised, EU countries should take measures to ensure that their competent administrative authorities regard electrical equipment as complying with the safety objectives of the Directive if the electrical equipment complies with the safety provisions of the International Commission on the Rules for the Approval of Electrical Equipment (CEEel) or of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

If harmonised standards or safety provisions do not yet exist, EU countries must take measures to ensure that their competent administrative authorities regard electrical equipment as complying with the safety objectives of the Directive if the electrical equipment is in accordance with the safety standards in force in the EU country of manufacture.

Placing on the market

Before placing electrical equipment on the market:

the manufacturer or his authorised representative established in the European Union must affix the ‘CE’ marking to each product and draw up a written ‘EC’ declaration of conformity;

the manufacturer must establish the technical documentation.

The ‘EC’ declaration of conformity must contain:

the name and address of the manufacturer or his authorised representative established in the EU;

a description of the electrical equipment;

a reference to the harmonised standards;

if required, references to the specifications with which conformity is declared;

identification of the signatory who has been empowered to enter into commitments on behalf of the manufacturer or his authorised representative established in the EU;

the last two digits of the year in which the ‘CE’ marking was affixed.

Safeguard

If, for safety reasons, an EU country prohibits the placing on the market of any electrical equipment or impedes its free movement, it shall inform the Commission and the other countries concerned.

Repeal

Directive 2006/95/EC has been repealed by Directive 2014/35/EU with effect from 20 April 2016.

REFERENCE

Act

Entry into force

Deadline for transposition in the Member States

Official Journal

Directive 2006/95/EC

16.1.2007

-

OJ L374 of 27.12.2006, pp. 10-19.

RELATED ACT

Directive 2014/35/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to the making available on the market of electrical equipment designed for use within certain voltage limits (OJ L 96 of 29.03.2014, pp. 357-374).

Last updated: 23.04.2015

Top