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Iceland – Transport

Summaries of EU legislation: direct access to the main summaries page.
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Iceland – Transport

Candidate countries conduct negotiations with the European Union (EU) in order to prepare themselves for accession. The accession negotiations cover the adoption and implementation of European legislation (acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

ACT

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1202 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

SUMMARY

The 2011 Report notes Iceland’s good level of alignment on transport, due to its membership of the European Economic Area (EEA). The country must pursue the implementation of these provisions throughout the pre-accession period.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission's words)

EU transport legislation aims at improving the functioning of the internal market by promoting safe, efficient and environment- and user-friendly transport services. The transport acquis covers the sectors of road transport, railways, aviation, maritime transport and inland waterways. It covers technical and safety standards, social conditions, the monitoring of state aid and market liberalisation in the context of the internal transport market.

EVALUATION

The country achieved a satisfactory level of alignment in the field of transport policy. However, it must still transpose the European legislation applicable to air and road transport.

See also

Last updated: 13.10.2011

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