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Europol Drugs Unit

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Europol Drugs Unit

The Europol Drugs Unit (EDU) was set up as a forerunner to the European Police Office (Europol). It strengthens cooperation beween the Member States of the European Union to combat certain types of organised crime at international level.

ACT

Joint action 95/73/JHA of 10 March 1995 concerning the Europol Drugs Unit [See amending acts]

SUMMARY

The Europol Drugs Unit (EDU) was set up as a forerunner to the European Police Office (Europol). The EDU operated from 1995 to 1999 and was replaced by Europol on 1 July 1999.

The Europol Drugs Unit had been charged by the Member States with:

  • the exchange and analysis of information and intelligence affecting at least two Member States;
  • helping the police and other competent agencies to combat these activities.

The criminal activities under the Europol Drugs Unit extended over the years and in the end included the following:

  • illicit drug trafficking;
  • illicit trafficking in radioactive and nuclear substances;
  • crimes involving clandestine immigration networks;
  • trafficking in human beings;
  • illicit vehicle trafficking;
  • the criminal organisations involved and associated money-laundering activities.

The EDU had the task of establishing a directory of specialised competences, skills and expertise for the fight against crime. The directory was established and updated on the basis of contributions from the Member States. Europol took over management of it.

The Europol Drugs Unit was made up of a coordinator, an assistant coordinator, members of the management team, liaison officers representing the different Member States of the European Union, national experts on secondment and staff of the Drugs Unit.

The activities of each liaison officer were governed by the national law of his own Member State. The Member States were therefore responsible for controlling their own liaison officers. In the same way, the exchange of personal information between the officers had to respect the national laws on the protection of personal data. However, no personal information could be stored centrally by the Unit, whether automatically or otherwise.

The Coordinator had to submit to the Council a six-monthly written report on his management and the activities of the Unit.

References

Act

Entry into force

Deadline for transposition in the Member States

Official Journal

Joint action 95/73/JHA

20.03.1995

-

OJ L 62 of 20.03.1995

Amending act(s)

Entry into force

Deadline for transposition in the Member States

Official Journal

Joint action 96/748/JHA

31.12.1996

-

OJ L 342 of 31.12.1996

RELATED ACTS

Joint Action 96/747/JHA of 29 November 1996 concerning the creation and maintenance of a directory of specialised competences, skills and expertise in the fight against international organised crime, in order to facilitate law enforcement cooperation between the Member States of the European Union.

Last updated: 17.08.2005

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