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Document 52017PC0262

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Proposal for a REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL laying down the legal framework of the European Solidarity Corps and amending Regulations (EU) No 1288/2013, (EU) No 1293/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1305/2013, (EU) No 1306/2013 and Decision No 1313/2013/EU

COM/2017/0262 final - 2017/0102 (COD)
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Brussels, 30.5.2017

COM(2017) 262 final

2017/0102(COD)

Proposal for a

REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

laying down the legal framework of the European Solidarity Corps and amending Regulations (EU) No 1288/2013, (EU) No 1293/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1305/2013, (EU) No 1306/2013 and Decision No 1313/2013/EU

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EXPLANATORY MEMORANDUM

1.CONTEXT OF THE PROPOSAL

Reasons for and objectives of the proposal

The European Union is built on solidarity, a shared value which is strongly felt throughout European society. Solidarity defines the European project and provides the necessary unity to cope with current and future crises by holding a strong moral ground. Solidarity provides a clear compass to guide the European youth in their aspirations for a better Union. In the Rome Declaration, at the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the Treaties of Rome, the leaders of 27 Member States and of the European Council, the European Parliament and the European Commission reaffirmed their commitment to enhance unity and solidarity in order to increase the strength and resilience of the European Union 1 .

The State of the Union address of 14 September 2016 emphasized the need to invest in young people and announced the idea of a European Solidarity Corps to create opportunities for young people across the European Union to make a meaningful contribution to society, show solidarity and to develop their skills, "thus getting not only work but also invaluable human experience". The Bratislava Summit of 16 September 2016 called for reinforced political momentum to support young Europeans and to establish new EU programmes to improve opportunities for them. The Commission Communication “A European Solidarity Corps” of 7 December 2016 2 launched the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps and reiterated the target of 100 000 young Europeans taking part in the European Solidarity Corps by 2020. During this initial phase, eight different EU programmes 3 have been mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the EU.

This proposal also responds to the call by the European Council in its Conclusions of 15 December 2016 to take work on the European Solidarity Corps forward 4 , and it is one of the priority initiatives included in the Joint Declaration on the EU's legislative priorities for 2017 5 , whereby the Presidents of the Parliament, Council and Commission committed to streamlining the efforts of their Institutions to ensure swift legislative progress on priority initiatives with a view to delivery before the end of 2017.

This proposal provides the legal framework for the European Solidarity Corps to offer opportunities for young people to engage in solidarity activities, which will contribute to addressing unmet societal needs, while enhancing young people’s personal, educational, social, civic and professional development. In shaping this proposal, the Commission has taken into account the evidence and findings gathered through the ex-ante evaluation that accompanies it, as well as the views and suggestions collected through an extensive open consultation process, as further described in the relevant sections below. This preparatory work helped identify the following gaps that this proposal aims to address.

There are many young people who want to engage in solidarity activities and, at the same time, there are many unmet needs in communities that could be better addressed thanks to the involvement of young people in solidarity activities. There is an untapped demand by many organisations for motivated young people to support them in their efforts; if supported, these organisations could offer even more to communities. There are however shortcomings in the matching of supply and demand and obstacles related to the availability of resources, to ensuring quality, as well as various legal aspects.

The main challenges in this field can be summarised as follows:

in recent decades, our society has insufficiently invested in empowering young Europeans to effectively engage in solidarity activities, either as volunteers or through occupational activities. Following the global financial and economic crisis the EU economy is now back on a more stable footing, but the recovery is still unevenly distributed across society and regions and the challenge is particularly acute for the younger generation. Solidarity activities have the concrete potential to mobilise young people for positive causes and help them develop the knowledge, skills and competences which will be essential for their personal, socio-educational, professional and civic development. This is true for all young people, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Encouraging the involvement of those young people in solidarity activities is a specific issue that also needs to be considered in this context;

addressing solidarity and building social, economic and civic cohesion requires a rich tissue of dynamic organisations (private and public, profit and non-profit). In this context, there is a need to cater better for the needs of such organisations, especially those working at the grass-root level with the most disadvantaged communities. Organisations creating and offering solidarity placements need support, in terms of resources, ensuring appropriate training and preparation for volunteers, trainees or workers as well as to be active in a European context. Organisations also need clear and simple rules;

the landscape of solidarity opportunities – be it in an occupational or volunteering perspective – is quite fragmented across the EU. Where opportunities exist, there is often a lack of awareness. The fragmentation also leads to shortcomings when it comes to understanding, documenting and validating what young people learnt from engaging in a particular solidarity action.

In the absence of measures to bring organisations and young people together around solidarity, there is a risk that an important potential for solidarity activities goes untapped, resulting in unnecessary welfare loss to organisations, young people and society as a whole.

Against this background, the European Solidarity Corps aims at enhancing the engagement of young people and organisations in solidarity activities which are of high quality and accessible to all young people, as a means to contribute to strengthening cohesion and solidarity in Europe, supporting communities and responding to unmet societal needs. In order to reach this general objective, the European Solidarity Corps will provide young people with easily accessible opportunities to engage in volunteering, traineeships or jobs in solidarity-related sectors, as well as to devise and develop solidarity projects at their own initiative, which shall also contribute to improving their skills and competences for their personal, social and professional development, as well as their employability. The European Solidarity Corps will also support networking activities for European Solidarity Corps participants and organisations, aimed at fostering a European Solidarity Corps spirit and sense of belonging to a wider community committed to solidarity, as well as at encouraging the exchange of useful practices and experience. The European Solidarity Corps will further aim at ensuring that the solidarity activities offered to the young participants 6 contribute to addressing concrete societal challenges and to strengthening communities, that they are of high quality and that the learning outcomes resulting from young people’s participation in those activities are properly validated.

Consistency with existing policy provisions in the policy area

This proposal is part of the broader set of initiatives called "Investing in Europe's Youth" launched on 7 December 2016. It pushes ahead with the Europe-wide roll-out of all key EU youth policies, notably the European Youth Strategy, the Youth Guarantee, and the New Skills Agenda for Europe, all of which cover a wide range of actions in support of young people, from informal education and volunteering, to vocational training and employment. The goal is to improve opportunities for young people by substantially increasing their quality and their expected outcomes.

The European Solidarity Corps will draw on the rich and long-standing tradition and experience of Member States in activities that serve the public interest, e.g. through volunteering. Some Member States operate national civic service programmes offering young people the possibility to engage, others facilitate activities undertaken by civil society.

At EU level, the European Voluntary Service (EVS) has provided volunteering opportunities for young people for 20 years, and policies and programmes such as the Youth Guarantee and the “Your First Eures Job” are helping young people get into traineeships and jobs. The European Solidarity Corps will build on the strengths and experience of these initiatives, thus benefiting from building on a solid, existing basis while expanding it in order to offer new opportunities, wider visibility and greater impact. The European Solidarity Corps will offer new opportunities that are not supported under the current programmes, while simplifying access for both interested young people and organisations. The European Solidarity Corps will offer a single, easily accessible entry point through its Portal, and will aim at the widest possible outreach to participating organisations and to the young people involved. It will also develop and enhance training available before a placement, as well as relevant support and the validation of learning outcomes after a placement.

In order to ensure continuity with respect to the volunteering activities supported at EU level, those activities that have been supported under the European Voluntary Service and that fall within the geographical scope of the European Solidarity Corps will be supported by the latter in the form of cross-border volunteering placements. In parallel, the other European Voluntary Service activities that do not fall under the geographical scope of the European Solidarity Corps will continue to be supported under the Programme established by Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 7 . With respect to the interpretation of related legislation at Union level, the proposal includes provisions in order to ensure that both the cross-border volunteering placements under the European Solidarity Corps and the volunteering activities that will continue to be supported under Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 will be considered equivalent to those carried out under the European Voluntary Service.

In order to ensure efficient and effective implementation, the European Solidarity Corps will make maximum use of existing management arrangements already in place. This will allow focusing on maximising delivery and performance while minimising administrative burden. For this reason, the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps will be entrusted to existing structures, i.e. the European Commission, also through its Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA), and the National Agencies designated for the management of the actions referred to in the Youth Chapter of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 establishing the Erasmus+ Programme.

Consistency with other Union policies

The actions of the European Solidarity Corps will be consistent with and complementary to a variety of relevant EU policies and programmes, in particular, but not limited to, those relating to education and training, employment, gender equality, entrepreneurship (in particular social entrepreneurship), citizenship 8 and democratic participation, environment and nature protection, climate action, disaster prevention, preparedness and recovery, agriculture and rural development, provision of food and non-food items, health and well-being, creativity and culture, physical education and sport, social assistance and welfare, reception and integration of third-country nationals, territorial cooperation and cohesion.

In the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps launched in December 2016, eight different EU programmes have been mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the EU. These activities, whether implemented before or after the entry into force of the proposed Regulation, will continue to apply the rules and conditions set by the respective EU programmes that have financed them during the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps.

For the second phase starting with the entry into force of the proposed Regulation, several EU programmes will be contributing to the European Solidarity Corps. Some of them 9 will do so by means of contributions into the financial envelope of the European Solidarity Corps (as further explained in section 4); others 10 may contribute to the objectives of the European Solidarity Corps by supporting activities within its scope. This contribution will be financed in accordance with the respective basic acts of the concerned programmes.

2.    LEGAL BASIS, SUBSIDIARITY AND PROPORTIONALITY

Legal basis

The predominant purpose of this proposal is to provide opportunities for young people to engage in solidarity activities, including volunteering, traineeships, jobs, as well as projects developed by young people at their own initiative, which will have an important learning component to the benefit of young people’s personal, socio-educational and professional development. In line with this, the content of this proposal is focused on encouraging mobility, active engagement, non-formal education and vocational training of young people. This will also contribute to improving their employability and to facilitating transition to regular employment.

With that regard, the proposal is based on Articles 165(4) and 166(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. Article 165(4) allows Union action aimed at "encouraging the development of youth exchanges (…) and encouraging participation of young people in democratic life of Europe". Union action based on Article 166(4) represents an appropriate legal basis for an act such as this proposal that aims to "improve initial and continuing vocational training in order to facilitate vocational integration and reintegration into the labour market" and "facilitate access to vocational training and encourage mobility of instructors and trainees and particularly young people".

Subsidiarity (for non-exclusive competence)

In light of the European scale of the proposed objectives – to mobilise young people for solidarity causes throughout the European Union – an action at EU level is appropriate. The EU has a role to play in supporting a Europe-wide approach to solidarity. EU action through the European Solidarity Corps will not replace similar actions by Member States, but will serve to complement and support them, in full respect of the subsidiarity principle. While there are traditions in all Member States for running programs and instruments that support activities that serve the public interest, in particular through volunteering, these are quite diverse, with some countries preferring state intervention, and others letting civil society be in the lead. There are also different concepts and connotations of solidarity activities and volunteering, and the types of activities are different in content and duration. Moreover, there are quite different perceptions of how social protection relates to volunteering, as well as various degrees of legal status, learning and recognition. All this leads to fragmentation at EU level, which means that young people across the EU have uneven access to the opportunities on offer.

EU action through the European Solidarity Corps will contribute to addressing the need to overcome this fragmentation, as evidenced by the ex-ante evaluation that accompanies this proposal. At the same time, it will be an occasion to build on the lessons learnt from the variety of experiences across Member States, while boosting volunteering in those Member States where it is less prevalent today, as suggested by the stakeholders who were consulted during the preparation of this proposal. The European Solidarity Corps will complement the existing public and private policies, programmes and activities, both at national and European level. By applying a number of quality safeguards such as the European Solidarity Corps Charter, a quality label for participating organisations and the principles outlined in the Quality Framework for Traineeships, the European Solidarity Corps can help improve the quality of various placements for young people across the EU as well as the validation of their learning outcomes.

Furthermore, the European Solidarity Corps will offer a single entry point to high quality volunteering and occupational solidarity placements for young people across the EU, whereas currently these are only accessible via a multitude of schemes. It will therefore ensure that all interested young people across the EU have equal opportunities to join and easier access to a broader variety of activities. Bringing the different types of placements under one brand can also contribute to improving awareness and visibility of the opportunities available to young people.

The European Solidarity Corps will offer both placements that can be undertaken in a country other than the country of residence of the participants (cross-border) and placements that can be undertaken in the country of residence of the participants (in-country). This flexibility is in line with the proposals received from the consulted stakeholders. As far as cross-border placements are concerned, especially in view of the fragmentation in structures and programmes offering volunteering, traineeships as well as the diversity in understanding and concepts of the sector offering solidarity activities, individual Member State action cannot replace EU action. As far as in-country placements are concerned, the European Solidarity Corps can be expected to have an innovative character, while helping address local or national challenges from a broader European perspective. In particular, EU action can help overcome fragmentation in the offer of placements and ensure inclusiveness for all young people, including those who face obstacles to engage in international activities. It can also offer a European context and help find European solutions to specific challenges that are not confined to national borders.

Last but not least, the use of existing structures that have proved their efficiency and effectiveness will ensure an efficient and effective implementation of the European Solidarity Corps as well synergies and complementarities with Member States' actions in favour of youth.

Proportionality

The proposal addresses identified gaps in offering easily accessible opportunities for engagement in solidarity activities to young people and does not go beyond what is necessary to achieve its objectives.

Choice of the instrument

The proposed instrument is a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council.

3.RESULTS OF STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATIONS AND IMPACT ASSESSMENTS

Stakeholder consultations

In preparing this proposal and its accompanying ex-ante evaluation, consultation took place at different levels including a broad range of stakeholders as well as individual citizens, public administrations, and other EU institutions and bodies (namely, the European Parliament, the Council, the Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee).

An 8-week online public consultation was carried out, 660 replies and 82 position papers were received. The consultation was made available in 23 official languages of the EU, and replies were accepted in all these languages. In addition, a large stakeholder forum with around 700 participants was held on 12 April 2017 and targeted consultations were organised with Member States and key stakeholders (including, voluntary organisations, solidarity organisations, youth representatives, Public Employment Services and EURES coordinators, Youth Guarantee coordinators, social partners, companies, programme beneficiaries and programme stakeholders, including national authorities and national agencies of the Erasmus+ Programme).

A detailed overview of the consultation process is annexed to the ex-ante evaluation that accompanies this proposal. The main elements resulting from these consultations are summarised below.

In summary, the stakeholders participating in the consultations expressed an overall appreciation of the visibility and political recognition given to young people’s engagement for solidarity. They welcomed the new opportunities for young people to make a change thanks to the European Solidarity Corps. They emphasised the potential of the European Solidarity Corps to foster integration, inter-European and inter-generational solidarity and to promote common values. Yet, they highlighted the need for additional funding to ensure an inclusive approach, allowing the participation of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds and of small organisations as well as quality placements, while building upon already existing structures.

More specifically, one of the key issues highlighted by stakeholders was the need for an inclusive approach. As a matter of fact, many stakeholders specifically mentioned the need for a specific focus on inclusiveness for all young people, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds and with fewer opportunities.

Stakeholders emphasised that the European Solidarity Corps should have an even stronger focus on solidarity than the existing programmes with a clear definition of "solidarity activities". Stakeholders recognised that the activities in the scope of the European Solidarity Corps can contribute to the development of skills and competences, thus supporting non-formal and informal learning as well as youth employability. Organisations equally stressed a need to train volunteers and some of them also mentioned the need to issue a certificate for volunteers.

Possible overlaps with existing programmes and lack of funding were among the main concerns expressed by stakeholders. Many requested a separate budget for the European Solidarity Corps. The majority of stakeholders stressed that in order to meet current and future needs, the European Solidarity Corps needed to be provided with sufficient additional funds on top of the available resources from existing programmes. The majority of stakeholders also requested a clear distinction between volunteering and occupational activities in order to avoid cheap labour or unpaid work, such as by replacing trainees and employees with volunteers.

In terms of implementation, stakeholders underlined that it should be lean and effective in order to avoid unnecessary administrative burden for young people and organisations. They also stressed the importance to ensure high quality standards as well as to build on synergies and experience from existing, well-functioning schemes, such as the European Voluntary Service. Stakeholders highlighted the need to have a clear division of roles and competencies among implementing bodies, to clarify the rules for accreditation of organisations, to have a well-functioning matching tool between organisations and volunteers and a high quality support system for the participants as important factors to reach this goal.

When it comes to the geographical scope, the majority of stakeholders argued to ensure consistency with the conditions of existing programmes. Stakeholders supported the proposed possibility to foster solidarity activities at the local level in addition to cross-border opportunities and they acknowledged that these may make participation easier for disadvantaged young people. However, several stakeholders stressed the need for cooperation and coordination with national governments and local communities in order to ensure complementarity with existing programmes.

The proposal for the European Solidarity Corps largely reflects the views and recommendations collected during the consultations. In line with those, the European Solidarity Corps will offer new opportunities accessible to all young people with stronger emphasis on addressing solidarity needs and on encouraging the participation of disadvantaged young people, including by envisaging additional financial support when relevant. It will also place special emphasis on ensuring the relevance and quality of the activities to be supported. Quality and support measures, such as insurance, online linguistic support, general online training and specific training, a European Solidarity Corps certificate and post placement support will be offered to the participants. Quality will also apply to the organisations willing to offer placements under the European Solidarity Corps. To this end, and in line with the suggestions gathered during the consultations, a quality label will be introduced as a pre-condition for participation for all interested organisations. It will aim at checking their compliance with the principles and requirements of the European Solidarity Corps Charter, as regards their rights and responsibilities during all stages of the solidarity experience.

In line with stakeholders' recommendations, the European Commission will strive to improve the user-friendliness and to reduce the administrative burden of the registration and application process for both young people and organisations. The development of the European Solidarity Corps Portal is already a step in this direction. The Portal and the matching tool provide a single entry point for solidarity activities throughout the European Union.

With regard to the need to cater for additional funding as advocated by many stakeholders, the European Solidarity Corps will be funded from both additional resources and from contributions by several existing programmes, which are in line with the European Solidarity Corps objectives, thus maximising synergies and complementarities with existing schemes. Stakeholders also advocated for a clear distinction between volunteering and occupational activities. This will be catered for not only with respect to the definition of the activities to be supported, but also in relation to the financial support dedicated to these activities. In this respect, the legislative proposal introduces an indicative split for the financial support to solidarity placements and projects (80% for volunteering placements and solidarity projects on the one hand and 20% for traineeships and jobs on the other hand), which should also contribute to ensuring continuity in the activities supported by the programmes contributing to the European Solidarity Corps.

In terms of geographical scope, the starting point for implementation of the European Solidarity Corps will be the EU Member States. However, the proposed Regulation provides for the possibility to open up to other countries on the basis of bilateral agreements with those countries.

Impact assessment

An impact assessment has not been carried out given that the European Solidarity Corps has already been established by the Commission in its Communication in December 2016. The objective of the present Regulation represents a follow-up to that; this notwithstanding, given that it will involve significant spending, it is accompanied by an ex-ante evaluation to fulfil the requirements in the Financial Regulation.

The ex-ante evaluation examined challenges at two levels: focusing on young people and their opportunities to engage in solidarity activities on the one hand, and on broader social, institutional and organisational needs on the other. The ex-ante evaluation indicated a need for the EU to address the following major challenges in the framework of a European initiative for youth in the field of solidarity:

there is a need to overcome fragmentation and provide more opportunities to encourage the engagement of young people and organisations in solidarity activities, namely by bringing volunteering and occupational experiences under one umbrella with a shared quality approach and developing a visible and broad validation of the learning experience gained, regardless of the context in which it took place. There is also a need to ensure easy and equal access through lean procedures, whilst foreseeing appropriate measures to encourage the inclusion of young people from disadvantaged backgrounds;

there is a need to ensure that the placements and activities offered by a European initiative for youth in the field of solidarity respond to unmet societal needs as well as shared quality standards and a common understanding of the acquisition of the knowledge, skills and competences to be validated across borders.

The ex-ante evaluation focused on two options, namely: 1) to continue implementing the European Solidarity Corps through various existing programmes as it has been the case during the first phase launched in December 2016, whereby eight programmes have been funding solidarity actions, each one through its own legal basis, objectives and budget; 2) to develop a new self-standing initiative with strengthened focus on solidarity, which would build on the experience of existing programmes but would have its own clear set of objectives and ensure more clarity on the purpose and scope of the intervention.

The possibility of using the legal base of one of the existing programmes was discarded due to the fact that this would have resulted in a programme with a complex set of overlapping objectives and limited visibility of solidarity actions in a broader frame. Furthermore, such approach would have led to disengagement of stakeholders from the other programmes.

Thus, two options were identified, analysed and compared against the following criteria, which are in line with the stakeholders’ suggestions during the consultations:

Accessibility (visibility and clarity for organisations, young people and other stakeholders on how to participate and access funding for solidarity activities);

Quality (procedures and criteria ensuring quality and safety of placements);

Inclusiveness (measures to ensure the participation of disadvantaged young people);

Synergy (involvement of and synergies among organisations active in solidarity action regardless of their local, regional, national or European scope);

Efficiency and simplicity of management provisions and low administrative costs.

Based on this multi-criteria analysis, option 2 (to develop a new self-standing initiative with strengthened focus on solidarity) resulted as the option that would deliver better results against all the considered criteria and was therefore retained as the preferred option. This option will provide a clear and single access point for organisations and young people and will make solidarity actions more visible. It will embed a more inclusive approach through a dedicated inclusion strategy. It will provide overall quality of placements and of preparedness of the young participants through a series of specific qualitative processes and criteria (such as quality label for organisations, training, insurance, etc.). It will bring new synergies between the activities and their recognition as it will put them in one common framework and will help create new networks between people and organisations with common aspirations for solidarity. Option 2 will also allow simultaneously decreasing management costs while reaching greater effects (more value for money).

Different delivery mechanisms were considered with respect to the preferred Option: direct management, indirect management or a combination of both. The analysis concluded that the latter – a combination of direct and indirect management – would ensure the most cost-effective implementation in order to reach the envisaged target of mobilising 100 000 young people by 2020. The ex-ante evaluation also stressed that sufficient and consistent financial resources are essential in order to reach the envisaged target.

The ex-ante evaluation also highlighted the expected positive social impact of the preferred option both at individual level (e.g. improved knowledge, skills and competences for their personal and professional development; increased sense of solidarity and citizenship for their social and civic development) and at societal level (e.g. addressed needs in communities with effects on social welfare and well-being; increased support to organisations committed to solidarity with positive effects on their engagement and on the opportunities offered to young people; contribution to other policy goals such as youth participation, civil protection, social inclusion, cohesion, regional development, environmental protection; improved image of youth on some national media).

Promoting youth participation and social capital is also closely connected to economic growth. Increased participation and employability of young people can have positive consequences for employment and macro-economic growth. However, considering the relatively small size of the proposed intervention as well as the fact that its impact will be spread out throughout Europe and not concentrated on one particular Member State or sector, it was not possible to measure the real impact in economic terms. Similarly, it was not considered relevant to carry out an in-depth analysis of environmental impacts. The ex-ante evaluation acknowledged that, similarly to other mobility programmes, the European Solidarity Corps will in principle generate an increased demand for transport, which in turn can potentially lead to an increased emission of greenhouse gases. This impact was however considered negligible compared to the overall mobility fluxes in Europe. Nonetheless, it is worth noting that the European Solidarity Corps can, as a side-effect, play an important role in raising young people's awareness and mobilising them vis-à-vis environmental issues, as it has already been the case during the first phase, whereby the different contributing programmes have already supported a variety of projects that deal with environmental issues.

This proposal is fully consistent with the preferred option.

Fundamental rights

This proposal is fully in line with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU 11 , which acknowledges that solidarity is one of the universal values on which the EU is founded. In particular, this proposal takes into full account the rights and prohibitions laid down in Articles 5 (Prohibition of slavery and forced labour), 14 (Right to education), 15 (Freedom to choose an occupation and right to engage in work), 21 (Non-discrimination), 24 (The rights of the child), 26 (Integration of persons with disabilities), 31 (Fair and just working conditions) and 32 (Prohibition of child labour and protection of young people at work) of the Charter.

4.BUDGETARY IMPLICATIONS

The Commission proposes to finance three fourths of the European Solidarity Corps budget by redeployments from existing programmes. The remaining amount will be covered by the mobilisation of the Global Margin for Commitments in 2018 and by available unallocated margins in 2019 and 2020.

The prime reference amount under Heading 1a for the 2018-20 period is EUR 294.2 million, which includes redeployment under the same headings from the Erasmus+ programme (EUR 197.7 million) and the Employment and Social Innovation programme (EUR 10 million).

The allocation in Heading 1a will be complemented by contributions from programmes in other headings within their existing financial allocation, in line with the aim of mainstreaming solidarity activities in different EU programmes and funds of the EU budget. The total amount proposed for the contribution from other headings is EUR 47.3 million and relies on the following contributing programmes: the European Social Fund (EUR 35 million), the Union Civil Protection Mechanism (EUR 6 million), the LIFE programme (EUR 4.5 million) and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EUR 1.8 million).

The detailed budgetary and financial impact of the proposal is indicated in the legislative financial statement accompanying the proposal.

5.OTHER ELEMENTS

Implementation plans and monitoring, evaluation and reporting arrangements

In line with the analysis carried out in the context of the ex-ante evaluation that accompanies this proposal, and in order to ensure efficient and effective implementation, synergies and to minimise administrative burden, the European Solidarity Corps will use the existing management and implementation arrangements already in place under the Erasmus+ programme. Building on the positive experience of the implementation of this programme as well as on its structures, the proposal provides for a clear division of programme management tasks between the Commission, the National Agencies established under the Erasmus+ Programme and the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA). Since its founding in 2006, the EACEA has successfully implemented parts of the Erasmus+, Creative Europe, Europe for Citizens and EU Aid Volunteers programmes (and their predecessor programmes) to a high standard, as confirmed by a number of independent external evaluations. As required by Regulation (EC) No 58/2003 laying down the statute for executive agencies 12 , a cost-benefit analysis prior to any delegation of programmes to the executive agencies has been carried out and demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of the use of the EACEA for certain tasks related to the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps. In parallel, the successful model of National Agencies under Erasmus+ has delivered demonstrable performance and efficiency, coupled with a high level of assurance and sound financial management.

The monitoring and evaluation arrangements of the European Solidarity Corps will consist of permanent monitoring to assess progress and an evaluation to assess the existing evidence on the effectiveness of the results achieved.

Monitoring arrangements will be based on an extensive analysis of the quantitative outputs and qualitative outcomes of the European Solidarity Corps. The quantitative outputs will be systematically collected through the IT systems put in place for the management of the actions of the European Solidarity Corps. The qualitative outcomes will be monitored through periodical surveys targeting both individuals and participating organisations. The reporting and assessment arrangements by all implementing bodies will ensure a comprehensive monitoring of the implementation of the proposal.

In 2020, the Commission will publish a report taking stock of the progress made towards achieving the target of offering 100 000 young people opportunities under the European Solidarity Corps. The proposal will also be subject to an independent evaluation four years after its date of application to assess the qualitative outcomes of the supported actions, including their impact on the young people and organisations. The evaluation should take into account the existing evidence on the effectiveness and impact of the results of the European Solidarity Corps. The sources of verification will include the monitoring data, the information included in the work plans and reports from the implementing bodies, results arising from dissemination, evidence-based studies, surveys, etc.

Detailed explanation of the specific provisions of the proposal

Chapter I – General provisions of the proposed Regulation sets out its subject-matter, the definitions of certain recurring terms, the general and specific objectives of the European Solidarity Corps activities as well as the coherence and complementarity of Union action. The European Solidarity Corps aims to enhance the engagement of young people and organisations in solidarity activities of high quality, accessible to all young people, as a means to contribute to strengthening cohesion and solidarity in Europe, supporting communities and responding to societal challenges.

Chapter II – Actions of the European Solidarity Corps provides a description of the activities envisaged for the achievement of the objectives of the proposed Regulation. The Union's support measures include solidarity placements, projects and networking activities on the one hand and quality and support measures on the other.

Chapter III – Financial provisions sets out the budgetary envelope of the European Solidarity Corps for the 2018-2020 period and the envisaged forms of Union funding. The prime reference amount includes redeployments from the Erasmus+ programme (EUR 197.7 million) and from the Employment and Social Innovation programme (EUR 10 million) as well as additional resources for the financial years 2018, 2019 and 2020. The financial envelope is complemented by contributions from different headings and several EU programmes.

Chapter IV – Participation in the European Solidarity Corps specifies criteria for the participating countries, individuals and organisations. The participating countries are the EU Member States and possibly other countries on the basis of bilateral agreements. Young people aged 17-30 can register in the European Solidarity Corps Portal whereas participation can only start when they are between 18 and 30 years of age. A participating organisation that may make offers for solidarity placements or activities to registered individuals is any public or private entity, or an international organisation that carries out solidarity activities in the participating countries, provided that they have received a quality label certifying their adherence to the requirements of the European Solidarity Corps.

Chapter V – Performance, results and dissemination includes provisions for the Commission and the participating countries to ensure regular monitoring, reporting and evaluation of the performance of the European Solidarity Corps as well as to ensure the dissemination of information, publicity and follow-up with regard to all actions supported by the European Solidarity Corps.

Chapter VI – Management and audit system foresees the implementing bodies of the European Solidarity Corps. In management terms, the proposed implementation modality is a combination of indirect management (through national agencies at national level) and direct management (through the Commission at Union level, including the use of an executive agency on the basis of a cost-benefit analysis). The combination of management modes is based on the positive experience of the implementation of the Erasmus+ programme and builds on the existing structures of that programme. The proposal foresees that the national authorities and the national agencies designated for the management of the Youth actions under Erasmus+ will also act as national authorities and national agencies under the European Solidarity Corps in the relevant participating countries. For countries where a national authority and a national agency are not designated, they will be established in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013. National agencies will be in charge of the main part of the funds and will operate on the basis of a delegation agreement. Furthermore, for some tasks related to the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps, the Commission will use the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency. In implementing this Regulation, the Commission will perform tasks implying policy choices, in particular setting objectives and priorities, adopting work programmes (including financing decisions), representing the Commission in the programme committee, etc. The executive agency will be responsible for implementing tasks, such as the launch and conclusion of grant and procurement procedures, project monitoring, financial control and accounting, the contribution to programme evaluation and various support tasks.

Chapter VII – Control system foresees the necessary supervisory system meant to ensure that the protection of the financial interests of the Union is duly taken into account when actions financed under the European Solidarity Corps Regulation are implemented.

Chapter VIII – Implementing provisions sets out the necessary provisions for the conferral of certain powers to the Commission to adopt work programmes by way of implementing acts. As regards the Committee required under Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 13 to assist the Commission in adopting implementing acts, the proposal nominates the Committee established by article 36 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 establishing the Erasmus+ Programme. The Committee would work in different configurations (Erasmus+ and European Solidarity Corps) with the possibility for the Member States to nominate their delegates for the different configurations.

Chapter IX – Amending and final provisions provides the necessary amendments to the basic acts of those programmes which redirect funds from their respective 2014-2020 financial envelopes to the European Solidarity Corps actions. The final provisions set out the date of entry into force of the proposed Regulation which shall be binding in its entirety and directly applicable in all Member States from 1 January 2018.

2017/0102 (COD)

Proposal for a

REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

laying down the legal framework of the European Solidarity Corps and amending Regulations (EU) No 1288/2013, (EU) No 1293/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1305/2013, (EU) No 1306/2013 and Decision No 1313/2013/EU

THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL OF THE EUROPEAN UNION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, and in particular Articles 165(4) and 166(4) thereof,

Having regard to the proposal from the European Commission,

After transmission of the draft legislative act to the national parliaments,

Having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee 14 ,

Having regard to the opinion of the Committee of the Regions 15 ,

Acting in accordance with the ordinary legislative procedure 16 ,

Whereas:

(1)The European Union is built on solidarity, among its citizens and among its Member States. This common value guides its actions and provides the necessary unity to cope with current and future societal challenges, which young Europeans are willing to help address by expressing their solidarity in practice.

(2)The State of the Union address of 14 September 2016 17 emphasized the need to invest in young people and announced the establishment of a European Solidarity Corps with a view to creating opportunities for young people across the Union to make a meaningful contribution to society, show solidarity and develop their skills, thus getting not only work but also invaluable human experience.

(3)In its Communication “A European Solidarity Corps” of 7 December 2016 18 , the Commission emphasised the need to strengthen the foundations for solidarity work across Europe, to provide young people with more and better opportunities for solidarity activities covering a broad range of areas, and to support national and local actors, in their efforts to cope with different challenges and crises. The Communication launched a first phase of the European Solidarity Corps whereby different Union programmes have been mobilised to offer volunteering, traineeship or job opportunities to young people across the EU. These activities, whether implemented before or after the entry into force of this Regulation, should continue to apply the rules and conditions set by the respective Union programmes that have financed them under the first phase of the European Solidarity Corps.

(4)Young people should be provided with easily accessible opportunities to engage in solidarity activities, which could enable them to express their commitment to the benefit of communities while acquiring useful experience, skills and competences for their personal, educational, social, civic and professional development, thereby improving their employability. Those activities would also support the mobility of young volunteers, trainees and workers.

(5)The solidarity activities offered to young people should be of high quality, in the sense that they should respond to unmet societal needs, contribute to strengthening communities, offer young people the opportunity to acquire valuable knowledge and competences, be financially accessible to young people, and be implemented in safe and healthy conditions.

(6)The European Solidarity Corps would provide a single entry point for solidarity activities throughout the Union. Consistency and complementarity of that framework should be ensured with other relevant Union policies and programmes. The European Solidarity Corps should build on the strengths and synergies of existing programmes, notably the European Voluntary Service. It should also complement the efforts made by Member States to support young people and ease their school-to-work transition under the Youth Guarantee 19 by providing them with additional opportunities to make a start on the labour market in the form of traineeships or jobs in solidarity-related areas within their respective Member State or across borders. Complementarity with existing Union level networks pertinent to the activities under the European Solidarity Corps, such as the European Network of Public Employment Services, EURES and the Eurodesk network, should also be ensured. Furthermore, complementarity between existing related schemes, in particular national solidarity schemes and mobility schemes for young people, and the European Solidarity Corps should be ensured, building on good practices where appropriate.

(7)In order to maximise the impact of the European Solidarity Corps, provisions should be made to allow other Union programmes such as the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund, the Europe for Citizens programme, the European Regional Development Fund and the Health Programme to contribute to the objectives of the European Solidarity Corps by supporting activities within its scope. This contribution should be financed in accordance with the respective basic acts of the concerned programmes. Once they have obtained a valid European Solidarity Corps quality label, the beneficiaries should be given access to the European Solidarity Corps portal and receive the quality and support measures provided according to the type of activity offered.

(8)The European Solidarity Corps should open up new opportunities for young people to carry out volunteering, traineeship or job placements in solidarity-related areas as well as to devise and develop solidarity projects based on their own initiative. Those opportunities should contribute to enhancing their personal, educational, social, civic and professional development. The European Solidarity Corps should also support networking activities for European Solidarity Corps participants and organisations as well as measures to ensure the quality of the supported activities and to enhance the validation of their learning outcomes.

(9)Voluntary activities constitute a rich experience in a non-formal and informal learning context which enhances young people's personal, socio-educational and professional development, active citizenship and employability. Voluntary activities should not have an adverse effect on potential or existing paid employment, nor should they be seen as a substitute for it. In order to ensure continuity with respect to the volunteering activities that are supported at Union level, the volunteering activities under the European Voluntary Service that fall within the geographical scope of the European Solidarity Corps should be supported by the latter in the form of cross-border volunteering placements. The other volunteering activities under the European Voluntary Service that do not fall under the geographical scope of the European Solidarity Corps should continue to be supported under the Programme established by Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing 'Erasmus+': the Union programme for education, training, youth and sport 20 . With respect to the interpretation of related legislation at Union level, both the cross-border volunteering placements under the European Solidarity Corps and the volunteering activities that continue to be supported under Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 should be considered equivalent to those carried out under the European Voluntary Service.

(10)Traineeships and jobs in solidarity-related areas can offer additional opportunities for young people to make a start on the labour market while contributing to addressing key societal challenges. This can help foster the employability and productivity of young people while easing their transition from education to employment, which is key to enhancing their chances on the labour market. The traineeship placements offered under the European Solidarity Corps should be remunerated by the participating organisation and follow the quality principles outlined in the Council Recommendation on establishing a Quality Framework for Traineeships of 10 March 2014 21 . The traineeships and jobs offered should constitute a stepping stone for young people to enter the labour market and should therefore be accompanied by adequate post-placement support. The traineeship and job placements should be facilitated by relevant labour market actors, in particular public and private employment services, social partners and Chambers of Commerce. As participating organisations, they should be able to apply for funding via the competent implementing structure of the European Solidarity Corps in view of intermediating between the young participants and employers offering traineeship and job placements in solidarity sectors.

(11)Young people’s spirit of initiative is an important asset for society and for the labour market. The European Solidarity Corps should contribute to fostering this aspect by offering young people the opportunity to devise and implement their own projects aimed at addressing specific challenges to the benefit of their local communities. Those projects should be an opportunity to try out ideas and support young people to be themselves drivers of solidarity actions. They could also serve as a springboard for further engagement in solidarity activities and could be a first step towards encouraging European Solidarity Corps participants to engage in self-employment or setting up associations, NGOs or other bodies active in the solidarity, non-profit and youth sectors.

(12)Young people and organisations participating in the European Solidarity Corps should feel that they belong to a community of individuals and entities committed to enhancing solidarity across Europe. At the same time, participating organisations need support to strengthen their capacities to offer good quality placements to an increasing number of participants. The European Solidarity Corps should support networking activities aimed at strengthening young people and participating organisations’ engagement in this community, at fostering a European Solidarity Corps spirit, as well as at encouraging the exchange of useful practices and experience. Those activities should also contribute to raising awareness about the European Solidarity Corps among public and private actors as well as to collect feedback from participants and participating organisations on the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps.

(13)Particular attention should be paid to ensuring the quality of the placements and other opportunities offered under the European Solidarity Corps, in particular by offering training, language support, insurance, administrative and post-placement support to participants as well as the validation of the knowledge, skills and competences acquired through their European Solidarity Corps experience.

(14)To ensure the impact of European Solidarity Corps placements on the personal, educational, social, civic and professional development of the participants, the knowledge, skills and competences that are the learning outcomes of the placement should be properly identified and documented, in accordance with national circumstances and specificities, as recommended in the Council Recommendation of 20 December 2012 on the validation of non-formal and informal learning  22 .

(15)A quality label should be put in place to ensure compliance of the participating organisations with the principles and requirements of the European Solidarity Corps Charter, as regards their rights and responsibilities during all stages of the solidarity experience. Obtaining a quality label should be a precondition for participation but should not automatically lead to funding under the European Solidarity Corps.

(16)A European Solidarity Corps Resource Centre should assist the implementing bodies, the participating organisations and the young people taking part in the European Solidarity Corps in order to raise the quality of the implementation and of the activities of the European Solidarity Corps as well as to enhance the identification and validation of competences acquired through these activities.

(17)A European Solidarity Corps Portal should continuously be developed in order to ensure easy access to the European Solidarity Corps and to provide a one-stop shop for both interested individuals and organisations as regards, inter alia, registration, identification and matching of profiles and opportunities, networking and virtual exchanges, online training, language and post-placement support as well as other useful functionalities, which may arise in the future.

(18)This Regulation lays down a financial envelope for the period 2018-2020 which is to constitute the prime reference amount, within the meaning of Point 17 of the Interinstitutional Agreement between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management 23 , for the European Parliament and the Council during the annual budgetary procedure. The prime reference amount includes redeployments from the Erasmus+ programme (EUR 197.7 million) and from the Employment and Social Innovation programme (EUR 10 million) for the financial years 2018, 2019 and 2020, and it is complemented by contributions from several Union programmes under different headings, such as the European Social Fund, the Union Civil Protection Mechanism, the LIFE programme and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.

(19)In order to ensure continuity in the activities supported by the programmes contributing to the European Solidarity Corps, the financial support to solidarity placements and projects should indicatively follow an 80%-20% split between volunteering placements and solidarity projects on the one hand and traineeship and job placements on the other hand.

(20)In order to maximise the impact of the European Solidarity Corps, provisions should be made to allow participating countries to make additional national funding available in accordance with the rules of the European Solidarity Corps.

(21)In order to simplify requirements for beneficiaries, lump-sums, unit-costs or flat-rate funding should be used to the maximum possible extent.

(22)In addition to the Member States, the European Solidarity Corps should also be open to the participation of other countries on the basis of bilateral agreements. This participation should be based, where relevant, on additional appropriations to be made available in accordance with the procedures to be agreed with the concerned countries.

(23)The European Solidarity Corps should target young people aged 18-30. Participation in the activities offered by the European Solidarity Corps should require prior registration in the European Solidarity Corps Portal.

(24)Special attention should be paid to ensuring that the activities supported by the European Solidarity Corps are accessible to all young people, notably the most disadvantaged ones. Special measures should therefore be put in place to promote social inclusion, the participation of disadvantaged young people, as well as to take into account the constraints imposed by the remoteness of the outermost regions of the Union and the Overseas Countries and Territories 24 . Similarly, the participating countries should endeavour to adopt all appropriate measures to remove legal and administrative obstacles to the proper functioning of the European Solidarity Corps. This includes resolving, where possible, and without prejudice to the Schengen acquis and Union law on the entry and residence of third-country nationals, administrative issues that create difficulties in obtaining visas and residence permits.

(25)Any entity willing to participate in the European Solidarity Corps, whether funded by the European Solidarity Corps budget, by another Union programme or by a different funding source, should receive a quality label provided that the appropriate conditions are fulfilled. The process that leads to the attribution of a quality label should be carried out on a continuous basis by the implementing structures of the European Solidarity Corps. The attributed quality label should be reassessed periodically and could be revoked if, in the context of the checks to be performed, the conditions that led to its attribution were found to be no longer fulfilled.

(26)An entity willing to apply for funding to offer placements under the European Solidarity Corps should have first received a quality label as a precondition. This requirement should not apply to natural persons seeking financial support on behalf of an informal group of European Solidarity Corps participants for their solidarity projects.

(27)Effective performance management, including monitoring and evaluation, requires the development of specific, measurable and realistic indicators which can be measured over time and which reflect the logic of the intervention.

(28)Appropriate outreach, publicity and dissemination of the opportunities and results of the actions supported by the European Solidarity Corps should be ensured at European, national and local level. The outreach, publicity and dissemination activities should rely on all the implementing bodies of the European Solidarity Corps, including, when relevant, with the support of other key stakeholders.

(29)In order to ensure greater efficiency in communication to the public at large and stronger synergies between the communication activities undertaken at the initiative of the Commission, the resources allocated to communication under this Regulation should also contribute to covering the corporate communication of the political priorities of the Union, provided that these are related to the general objective of this Regulation.

(30)In order to ensure efficient and effective implementation of this Regulation, the European Solidarity Corps should make maximum use of existing management arrangements already in place. The implementation of the European Solidarity Corps should therefore be entrusted to existing structures, i.e. the Commission, the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency and the National Agencies designated for the management of the actions referred to in Chapter III of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

(31)In order to ensure financially sound implementation and close monitoring of the European Solidarity Corps at national level, it is important to use the existing National Authorities designated for the management of the actions referred to in Chapter III of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

(32)In order to ensure sound financial management and legal certainty in each participating country, each National Authority should designate an independent audit body. Where feasible, and in order to maximise efficiency, the independent audit body could be the same as the one designated for the actions referred to in Chapter III of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

(33)The financial interests of the Union should be protected through proportionate measures throughout the expenditure cycle, including the prevention, detection and investigation of irregularities, the recovery of funds lost, wrongly paid or incorrectly used and, where appropriate, penalties.

(34)In order to ensure uniform conditions for the implementation of this Regulation, implementing powers should be conferred on the Commission. Those powers should be exercised in accordance with Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down the rules and general principles concerning mechanisms for control by the Member States of the Commission's exercise of implementing powers 25 .

(35)In compliance with Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the European Union 26 , the Commission should adopt work programmes and inform the European Parliament and the Council thereof. The work programme should set out the measures needed for their implementation in line with the general and specific objectives of the European Solidarity Corps, the selection and award criteria for grants, as well as all other elements required. Work programmes and any amendments to them should be adopted by implementing acts in accordance with the examination procedure.

(36)Since the objective of this Regulation, namely to establish a European Solidarity Corps, cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States but can rather, by reason of its scale and effects, be better achieved at Union level, the Union may adopt measures, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity as set out in Article 5 of the Treaty on European Union. In accordance with the principle of proportionality, as set out in that Article, this Regulation does not go beyond what is necessary in order to achieve those objectives.

(37)For reasons of efficiency and effectiveness, the committee established under Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 should also assist the Commission in the implementation of this Regulation. With respect to the European Solidarity Corps, that committee should convene in a specific configuration and its mandate should be aligned in order to fulfil this new role. It should be for the participating countries to appoint the relevant representatives for those meetings, taking into account the volunteering and occupational dimensions of the European Solidarity Corps.

(38)Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 should be amended in order to take into account the changes to the European Voluntary Service resulting from the new volunteering activities supported in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps.

(39)The financial envelope of the European Solidarity Corps under Heading 1a of the Multiannual Financial Framework also builds on funds redeployed from the Erasmus+ programme. These funds should mainly come from appropriations aimed at financing European Voluntary Service activities that would fall under the scope of the volunteering placements supported under this Regulation. In addition, some appropriations of the Student Loan Guarantee Facility, which are unlikely to be absorbed under Erasmus+, should be redeployed with a view to providing adequate co-financing to the operating costs of national agencies and be brought more in line with the absorption capacity of this action.

(40)The financial envelope of the European Solidarity Corps under Heading 1a of the Multiannual Financial Framework should additionally be supplemented by financial contributions from other programmes and headings, which require the amendment of Regulations (EU) No 1293/2013 27 , (EU) No 1303/2013 28 , (EU) No 1305/2013 29 , (EU) No 1306/2013 30 as well as of Decision No 1313/2013/EU 31 of the European Parliament and of the Council.

(41)This Regulation should apply from 1 January 2018. In order to allow for the prompt application of the measures provided for in this Regulation, this Regulation should enter into force on the day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

HAVE ADOPTED THIS REGULATION:

CHAPTER I

GENERAL PROVISIONS

Article 1

Subject-matter

This Regulation lays down the legal framework for the European Solidarity Corps, which shall offer young people opportunities to engage in solidarity activities.

Article 2

Definitions

For the purposes of this Regulation, the following definitions shall apply:

(1)“solidarity activity” means an activity aimed at addressing unmet societal needs to the benefit of a community while also fostering the individual’s personal, educational, social, civic and professional development, which may take the form of placements, projects or networking activities, developed in relation to different areas, such as education and training, employment, gender equality, entrepreneurship, in particular social entrepreneurship, citizenship and democratic participation, environment and nature protection, climate action, disaster prevention, preparedness and recovery, agriculture and rural development, provision of food and non-food items, health and wellbeing, creativity and culture, physical education and sport, social assistance and welfare, reception and integration of third-country nationals, territorial cooperation and cohesion;

(2)“participant” means a young person who has registered in the European Solidarity Corps Portal and takes part in a solidarity activity under the European Solidarity Corps offered by a participating organisation;

(3)“disadvantaged young people” means individuals who need additional support because of disability, educational difficulties, economic obstacles, cultural differences, health problems, social obstacles, geographical obstacles;

(4)“participating organisation” means any public or private entity that has been attributed the European Solidarity Corps quality label, which offers a placement to a participant in the European Solidarity Corps or implements other activities in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps;

(5)“solidarity placement” means a volunteering activity, traineeship or job in a solidarity-related area, which is organised by a participating organisation and which contributes to addressing key societal challenges while enhancing the personal, educational, social, civic and professional development and the employability of the European Solidarity Corps participant who undertakes it, either in a country other than the country of residence (cross-border) or in the country of residence of the participant (in-country);

(6)volunteering means a full-time 32 unpaid voluntary service for a period of up to twelve months, which provides young people with the opportunity to contribute to the daily work of organisations active in solidarity-related fields, to the ultimate benefit of the communities within which the activities are carried out, including a solid learning and training dimension in order to enable the young volunteer(s) to gain skills and competences, which will be useful for their personal, educational, social and professional development, and which will also contribute to improving their employability;

(7)“volunteering teams’ placements” means placements allowing teams of European Solidarity Corps participants from different participating countries to volunteer together for a common objective, by carrying out manual or intellectual tasks, on a worthwhile community service project for a period between two weeks and two months;

(8)“traineeship” means a period of work practice from two to twelve months, remunerated by the organisation hosting the European Solidarity Corps participant, based on a written traineeship agreement, which includes a learning and training component, and undertaken in order to gain practical and professional experience with a view to improving employability and facilitating transition to regular employment;

(9)"job" means a period of work from two to twelve months, remunerated by the participating organisation employing the European Solidarity Corps participant, carried out in a participating country and based on an employment contract in accordance with the national regulatory framework of that participating country;

(10)“solidarity project” means a local initiative for a period from two to twelve months, which is set up and carried out by groups of at least five European Solidarity Corps participants, with a view to addressing key challenges within their local community while linking them to a broader European perspective;

(11)“quality label” means the certification attributed to a public or private entity or an international organisation willing to provide placements under the European Solidarity Corps following a procedure aimed at ensuring compliance with the principles and requirements of the European Solidarity Corps Charter;

(12)“European Solidarity Corps Charter” means the document that sets out the respective rights and responsibilities that all the entities willing to join the European Solidarity Corps must agree to adhere to;

(13)“European Solidarity Corps Resource Center” means the additional functions performed by a designated national agency to support the development and implementation of activities under the European Solidarity Corps as well as the identification of the competences acquired by the participants through their placements and projects;

(14)"European Solidarity Corps Portal" means a web-based tool that provides relevant online services to the European Solidarity Corps participants and participating organisations, including providing information about the European Solidarity Corps, registering participants, searching for participants for placements, advertising and searching for placements, searching for potential project partners, managing contacts and offers for placements and projects, training, communication and networking activities, informing and notifying about opportunities, as well as other relevant developments related to the European Solidarity Corps.

Article 3

General objective

The objective of the European Solidarity Corps is to enhance the engagement of young people and organisations in accessible and high quality solidarity activities as a means to contribute to strengthening cohesion and solidarity in Europe, supporting communities and responding to societal challenges.

Article 4

Specific objectives

The European Solidarity Corps shall pursue the following specific objectives:

(a)to provide young people, with the support of participating organisations, with easily accessible opportunities for engagement in solidarity activities while improving their skills and competences for personal, educational, social, civic and professional development, as well as their employability and facilitating transition into the labour market, including by supporting the mobility of young volunteers, trainees and workers;

(b)to ensure that the solidarity activities that are offered to the European Solidarity Corps participants contribute to addressing concrete, unmet societal needs and strengthening communities, are of high quality and properly validated.

Article 5

Coherence and complementarity of Union action

1.The actions of the European Solidarity Corps shall be consistent with and complementary to the relevant policies and programmes relating to the areas mentioned in Article 2(1) as well as existing Union level networks pertinent to the activities of the European Solidarity Corps.

2.The Commission and the participating countries shall cooperate to achieve efficiency and effectiveness, by ensuring coherence between national programmes and schemes related to solidarity, education, vocational training and youth on the one hand and actions under the European Solidarity Corps on the other hand. Those actions shall build on relevant good practices and existing programmes.

3.Other Union programmes may also contribute to the objectives of the European Solidarity Corps by supporting activities within its scope. This contribution shall be financed in accordance with their respective basic acts.

CHAPTER II

ACTIONS OF THE EUROPEAN SOLIDARITY CORPS

Article 6

Actions of the European Solidarity Corps

The European Solidarity Corps shall pursue its objectives through the following types of actions:

(a)solidarity placements, projects and networking activities

(b)quality and support measures.

Article 7

Solidarity placements, projects and networking activities

1.This Action shall support:

(a)solidarity placements in the form of volunteering, traineeships or jobs, including individual cross-border and in-country placements as well as volunteering teams’ placements;

(b)solidarity projects at the initiative of European Solidarity Corps participants;

(c)networking activities for individuals and organisations participating in the European Solidarity Corps.

2.The cross-border volunteering placements referred to in point (a) of paragraph 1 shall be considered equivalent to those carried out under the European Voluntary Service and references to the European Voluntary Service in the Union legislation shall be read as also referring to the European Solidarity Corps as regards those placements.

Article 8

Quality and support measures

This Action shall support:

(a)measures aimed at ensuring the quality of solidarity placements, including training, language support, administrative support for participants and participating organisations, insurance, post-placement support as well as the development of a certificate that identifies and documents the knowledge, skills and competences acquired during the placement;

(b)the development and maintenance of a quality label for entities willing to provide placements for the European Solidarity Corps in order to ensure compliance with the principles and requirements of the European Solidarity Corps Charter;

(c)the activities of a European Solidarity Corps Resource Centre to support and raise the quality of the implementation of the actions of the European Solidarity Corps and enhance the validation of their outcomes;

(d)the establishment, maintenance and updating of the European Solidarity Corps Portal and other relevant online services as well as the necessary IT support systems and web-based tools.

CHAPTER III

FINANCIAL PROVISIONS

Article 9

Budget

1.The overall budget available for the implementation of the European Solidarity Corps is set at EUR 341 500 000 in current prices, for the period from 1 January 2018 until 31 December 2020.

2.The amount referred to in paragraph 1 includes a financial envelope of EUR 294 200 000 33 in current prices supplemented by contributions from:

(a)the European Social Fund, contributing with EUR 35 000 000 in current prices;

(b)the Union Civil Protection Mechanism, contributing with EUR 6 000 000 in current prices;

(c)the LIFE programme, contributing with EUR 4 500 000 in current prices;

(d)the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, contributing with EUR 1 800 000 in current prices.

3.The financial support to solidarity placements and projects referred to in paragraphs (a) and (b) of Article 7(1) shall indicatively be 80% for volunteering placements and solidarity projects; and 20% for traineeship and job placements.

4.The financial allocation may also cover expenses pertaining to preparatory, monitoring, control, audit and evaluation activities which are required for the management of the European Solidarity Corps and the achievement of its objectives, in particular, studies, meetings of experts and information and communication actions, expenses linked to the establishment, maintenance and updating of the European Solidarity Corps Portal and the necessary IT support systems, and all other technical and administrative assistance expenses incurred by the Commission for the management of the European Solidarity Corps.

5.If necessary, appropriations may be entered in the budget beyond 2020 to cover similar expenses, in order to enable the management of actions not yet completed by 31 December 2020.

6.A participating country may make national funding available to beneficiaries to be managed in accordance with the rules of the European Solidarity Corps and, to this end, use the decentralised structures of the European Solidarity Corps, as long as it ensures the complementary pro rata funding of these structures.

Article 10

Forms of Union funding

1.European Solidarity Corps funding may be provided in one or more of the forms laid down in Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012, in particular grants, procurement and prizes.

2.The Commission may implement the European Solidarity Corps indirectly in accordance with Article 58(1)(c) of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012.

CHAPTER IV

PARTICIPATION IN THE EUROPEAN SOLIDARITY CORPS

Article 11

Participating countries

1.The Member States shall participate in the European Solidarity Corps.

2.The European Solidarity Corps shall be open for the participation of other countries on the basis of bilateral agreements. Cooperation shall be based, where relevant, on additional appropriations to be made available in accordance with the procedures to be agreed with those countries.

Article 12

Participation of individuals

1.Young people aged 17 to 30 years willing to participate in the European Solidarity Corps shall register in the European Solidarity Corps Portal. However, at the moment of commencing a placement or a project a registered young person shall be at least 18 years of age and not older than 30.

2.When implementing this Regulation, the Commission and the participating countries shall ensure that particular efforts are made to promote social inclusion, in particular for the participation of disadvantaged young people.

Article 13

Participating organisations

1.The European Solidarity Corps shall be open to the participation of public or private entities, or international organisations, provided that they have received a European Solidarity Corps quality label.

2.An application from an eligible entity to become a European Solidarity Corps participating organisation shall be assessed by the competent implementing body of the European Solidarity Corps in order to ascertain that its activities adhere to the requirements of the European Solidarity Corps.

3.As a result of the assessment the entity may be attributed the European Solidarity Corps quality label. The obtained label shall be re-assessed periodically and may be revoked.

4.Any entity which has received the European Solidarity Corps quality label shall be given access to the European Solidarity Corps Portal and shall be allowed to make offers for solidarity activities to registered individuals.

5.The European Solidarity Corps quality label shall not automatically lead to funding under the European Solidarity Corps.

6.The solidarity activities and related quality and support measures offered by a participating organisation may receive funding under the European Solidarity Corps or under another Union programme autonomously contributing to the objectives of the European Solidarity Corps or from other funding sources which do not depend on the Union budget.

Article 14

Access to the European Solidarity Corps funding

Any public or private entity established in a participating country as well as international organisations carrying out solidarity activities in the participating countries may apply for funding under the European Solidarity Corps. In the case of the activities referred to in point (a) of Article 7(1), a quality label shall be obtained by the participating organisation as a pre-condition for receiving funding under the European Solidarity Corps. In the case of the solidarity projects referred to in point (b) of Article 7(1), natural persons may also apply for funding on behalf of informal groups of European Solidarity Corps participants.

CHAPTER V

PERFORMANCE, RESULTS AND DISSEMINATION

Article 15

Monitoring and evaluation of performance and results

1.The Commission, in cooperation with the participating countries, shall regularly monitor the performance of the European Solidarity Corps towards achieving its objectives.

2.Progress on the specific objectives shall be measured by using indicators, such as:

(a)number of participants in volunteering placements (in-country and cross-border);

(b)number of participants in traineeship placements (in-country and cross-border);

(c)number of participants in job placements (in-country and cross-border);

(d)number of participants in solidarity projects;

(e)number of organisations holding a European Solidarity Corps quality label.

At the latest six months after the entry into force of this Regulation, the Commission shall establish a detailed programme for monitoring the outputs, results and impacts of this Regulation.

3.In 2020 the Commission shall publish a report taking stock of the progress made towards achieving its results, including the target of offering 100 000 young people opportunities under the European Solidarity Corps by 2020 (covering all the placements and projects referred to in points (a) and (b) of Article 7(1)).

4.Four years after the date of application of this Regulation the Commission shall carry out an independent evaluation of this Regulation and present a report on the main findings to the European Parliament, the Council, the Committee of the Regions and the European Economic and Social Committee.

Article 16

Communication and dissemination

1.The Commission, in cooperation with the participating countries, shall ensure the dissemination of information, publicity and follow-up with regard to all actions supported in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps.

2.The national agencies referred to in Article 20 shall develop a consistent policy with regard to effective outreach as well as dissemination and exploitation of results of activities supported under the actions they manage, shall assist the Commission in the general task of disseminating information concerning the European Solidarity Corps, including information in respect of actions managed at national and Union level, and their results, and shall inform relevant target groups about the initiatives undertaken in their country.

3.Communication activities shall also contribute to the corporate communication of the political priorities of the Union, provided that they are related to the general objective of this Regulation.

CHAPTER VI

MANAGEMENT AND AUDIT SYSTEM

Article 17

Implementing bodies

This Regulation shall be implemented in a consistent manner by:

(a)the Commission at Union level;

(b)the national agencies at national level in the participating countries.

Article 18

National authority

In each country participating in the European Solidarity Corps, the national authorities designated for the management of actions referred to in Chapter III of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 shall also act as national authorities in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps. Paragraphs 1, 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16 of Article 27 of that Regulation shall apply to the European Solidarity Corps by analogy. For countries referred to in paragraph 2 of Article 11 of this Regulation, where a national authority is not identified for that country, it shall be designated in accordance with paragraphs 2 to 6 and 8 to 15 of Article 27 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

Article 19

Independent audit body

1.The national authority shall designate an independent audit body. The independent audit body shall issue an audit opinion on the yearly management declaration referred to in Article 60(5) of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012.

2.The independent audit body shall

(a)have the necessary professional competence to carry out public sector audits;

(b)ensure that its audits take account of internationally accepted audit standards;

(c)not be in a position of conflict of interest with regard to the legal entity of which the national agency referred to in Article 20 forms part and be independent, in terms of its functions, of the legal entity of which the national agency forms part.

3.The independent audit body shall give the Commission and its representatives, as well as the Court of Auditors, full access to all documents and reports in support of the audit opinion that it issues on the national agency's yearly management declaration.

Article 20

National agency

1.In each country participating in the European Solidarity Corps, the national agencies designated for the management of the actions referred to in Chapter III of the Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 in their respective countries shall also act as national agencies in the framework of the European Solidarity Corps.

Paragraphs 1, 2, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of Article 28 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 shall apply to the European Solidarity Corps by analogy.

2.Without prejudice to Article 28(3) of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013, the national agency shall also be responsible for managing all stages of the project lifecycle of those actions of the European Solidarity Corps listed in the implementing acts referred to in Article 24, in accordance with point (c)(v) and (vi) of Article 58(1) of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 and with Article 44 of Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 1268/2012 34 .

3.For countries referred to in paragraph 2 of Article 11 of this Regulation, where a national agency is not designated for that country, it shall be established in accordance with paragraphs 2, 5, 6, 7 and 8 of Article 28 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

Article 21

European Commission

1.The rules applying to the relationship between the Commission and a national agency shall be laid down in a written document which shall:

(a)stipulate the internal control standards for national agencies and the rules for the management of the Union funds for grant support by the national agencies;

(b)include the national agency work programme comprising the management tasks of the national agency to which Union support is provided;

(c)specify the reporting requirements for the national agency.

2.The Commission shall each year make the following funds available to the national agency:

(a)funds for grant support in the participating country concerned for the actions of the European Solidarity Corps the management of which is entrusted to the national agency;

(b)a financial contribution in support of the management tasks of the national agency defined according to the modalities described in point (b) of Article 29(4) of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013.

3.The Commission shall lay down the requirements for the national agency work programme. The Commission shall not make European Solidarity Corps funds available to the national agency before having formally approved the national agency's work programme.

4.On the basis of the compliance requirements for national agencies referred to in Article 27(4) of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013, the Commission shall review the national management and control systems, the national agency's management declaration and the opinion of the independent audit body thereon, taking due account of the information provided by the national authority on its monitoring and supervision activities with regard to the European Solidarity Corps.

5.After assessing the yearly management declaration and the opinion of the independent audit body thereon, the Commission shall address its opinion and observations to the national agency and the national authority.

6.In the event that the Commission cannot accept the yearly management declaration or the independent audit opinion thereon, or in the event of unsatisfactory implementation by the national agency of the Commission's observations, the Commission may implement any precautionary and corrective measures necessary to safeguard the Union's financial interests in accordance with Article 60(4) of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012.

7.The Commission shall organise regular meetings with the network of national agencies in order to ensure coherent implementation of the European Solidarity Corps across all participating countries.

CHAPTER VII

CONTROL SYSTEM

Article 22

Principles of the control system

1.The Commission shall take appropriate measures ensuring that, when actions financed under this Regulation are implemented, the financial interests of the Union are protected by the application of measures to prevent fraud, corruption and any other illegal activities, by effective controls and, if irregularities are detected, by the recovery of the amounts wrongly paid and, where appropriate, by effective, proportionate and dissuasive penalties.

2.The Commission shall be responsible for the supervisory controls with regard to the European Solidarity Corps actions managed by the national agencies. It shall set the minimum requirements for the controls by the national agency and the independent audit body.

3.National agencies shall be responsible for the primary controls of grant beneficiaries for the actions of the European Solidarity Corps which are entrusted to them. Those controls shall give reasonable assurance that the grants awarded are used as intended and in compliance with the applicable Union rules.

4.With regard to the funds transferred to the national agencies, the Commission shall ensure proper coordination of its controls with the national authorities and the national agencies, on the basis of the single audit principle and following a risk-based analysis. This provision shall not apply to investigations carried out by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF).

Article 23

Protection of the financial interests of the Union

1.The Commission or its representatives and the Court of Auditors shall have the power to conduct audits, on the basis of documents and on the spot, in relation to all grant beneficiaries, contractors, subcontractors and other third parties who have received Union funds. They may also conduct audits and carry out controls in relation to the national agencies.

2.OLAF may carry out on-the-spot controls and inspections of economic operators concerned directly or indirectly by such funding in accordance with the procedure laid down in Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 35 , with a view to establishing whether there has been fraud, corruption or any other illegal activity affecting the financial interests of the Union in connection with a grant agreement or grant decision or a contract concerning Union funding.

3.Without prejudice to paragraphs 1 and 2, cooperation agreements with third countries and international organisations, and grant agreements, grant decisions and contracts resulting from the implementation of this Regulation, shall expressly empower the Commission, the Court of Auditors and OLAF to conduct such audits and carry out on-the-spot controls and inspections.

CHAPTER VIII

IMPLEMENTING PROVISIONS

Article 24

Implementation of the European Solidarity Corps

1.In order to implement this Regulation, the Commission shall adopt work programmes by way of implementing acts. Each work programme shall ensure that the general and specific objectives set out in Articles 3 and 4 are implemented in a consistent manner and shall outline the expected results, the method of implementation and its total amount. The work programmes shall also contain a description of the actions to be financed, an indication of the amount allocated to each action, an indication of the distribution of funds between the participating countries for the actions to be managed through the national agencies and an indicative implementation timetable.

2.Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure referred to in Article 25(2).

Article 25

Committee procedure

1.The Commission shall be assisted by the committee established by Article 36 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013. That committee shall be a committee within the meaning of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011.

2.Where reference is made to this paragraph, Article 5 of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 shall apply.

CHAPTER IX

AMENDING AND FINAL PROVISIONS

Article 26

Amendment to Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013

Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 is amended as follows:

1.Article 13 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 is replaced by the following:

“1. Learning mobility of individuals shall support:

(a) the mobility of young people in non-formal and informal learning activities between the Programme countries; such mobility may take the form of youth exchanges and volunteering, as well as innovative activities building on existing provisions for mobility;

(b) the mobility of persons active in youth work or youth organisations and youth leaders; such mobility may take the form of training and networking activities.

2. This action shall also support the mobility of young people, including volunteering, as well as the mobility of persons active in youth work or youth organisations and youth leaders, to and from partner countries, in particular neighbourhood countries.

3. The volunteering activities referred to in paragraphs 1(a) and 2 shall be considered equivalent to those carried out under the European Voluntary Service and references to the European Voluntary Service in the Union legislation shall be read as also referring to those volunteering activities.”

2.In Article 18 of Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013, paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 are replaced by the following:

"1. The financial envelope for the implementation of the Programme as from 1 January 2014 is set at EUR 14 576 824 000 in current prices.

2. The amount referred to in paragraph 1 shall be allocated to the actions of the Programme as follows, with a margin of flexibility not exceeding 5 % of each of the allocated amounts:

(a) at least 80,7 % to education and training, from which the following minimum allocations shall be assigned:

(i) 44,3 % to higher education, representing 35,7 % of the total budget;

(ii) 21,4 % to vocational education and training, representing 17,3 % of the total budget;

(iii) 14,6 % to school education, representing 11,8 % of the total budget;

(iv) 4,9 % to adult learning, representing 3,9 % of the total budget;

(b) 8,8 % to youth;

(c) up to 1,5 % to the Student Loan Guarantee Facility;

(d) 1,9 % to Jean Monnet;

(e) 1,8 % to sport, of which no more than 10 % to the activity mentioned under point (b) of Article 17(1);

(f) 3,5 % as operating grants to national agencies;

(g) 1,8 % to cover administrative expenditure.

3. Of the allocations referred to in points (a) and (b) of paragraph 2, at least 63 % shall be allocated to learning mobility of individuals, at least 27 % to cooperation for innovation and the exchange of good practices and at least 4,2 % to support for policy reform."

Article 27

Amendment to Regulation (EU) No 1293/2013

In Article 4 of Regulation (EU) No 1293/2013, the following paragraph is added:

"3. A maximum of EUR 3 000 000 in current prices from the sub-programme for Environment corresponding to the priority area Environment Governance and Information and of EUR 1 500 000 in current prices from the sub-programme for Climate Action corresponding to the priority area Climate Governance and Information shall be allocated to finance projects within the meaning of Article 17(4) implemented by the European Solidarity Corps in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, which contribute to one or more of the priority areas within the meaning of Articles 9 and 13. This allocation shall be implemented solely in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, to the exclusion of the specific requirements of Regulation (EU) No 1293/2013. "

Article 28

Amendments to Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013

Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 is amended as follows:

1.Article 58(1) is amended as follows:

(a) the first subparagraph is replaced by the following:

At the initiative of the Commission, the ESI Funds may support the preparatory, monitoring, administrative and technical assistance, evaluation, audit and control measures necessary for implementing this Regulation and support actions pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX as referred to in the third subparagraph in so far as those actions pursue the aim of economic, social and territorial cohesion”.

(b) In the third subparagraph, the following point (m) is added:

"(m) actions financed pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX on the European Solidarity Corps in order to enhance the personal, educational, social, civic and professional development of young people, as well as their employability and facilitating transition into the labour market."

2.In Article 91(3), the following subparagraph is added:

"EUR 35 000 000 in current prices of the amount allocated to technical assistance at the initiative of the Commission shall be allocated to the European Solidarity Corps to support its actions, in accordance with point (a) of article 9(2) of Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX. The allocation shall be implemented solely in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, to the exclusion of the specific requirements of Fund-specific Regulations."

Article 29

Amendment to Regulation (EU) No 1305/2013

In Article 51(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1305/2013, the following subparagraph is added under the first subparagraph:

"The EAFRD may also finance actions implemented by the European Solidarity Corps with an amount of EUR 1 800 000 in current prices in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, which contribute to one or more of the Union priorities for rural development. The allocation shall be implemented solely in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, to the exclusion of the specific requirements of Regulation (EU) No 1305/2013."

Article 30

Amendment to Regulation (EU) No 1306/2013

In Article 6 of Regulation (EU) No 1306/2013, the following point (j) is added:

"(j) actions implemented by the European Solidarity Corps in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, which contribute to one or more of the Union priorities in the area of agriculture and rural development and notably the actions referred to in the second subparagraph of Article 51(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1305/2013. The allocation shall be implemented solely in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, to the exclusion of the specific requirements of Fund-specific Regulations."

Article 31

Amendment to Decision No 1313/2013/EU

In Article 19(1) of Decision No 1313/2013/EU, the following subparagraph is added after the second subparagraph:

"EUR 6 000 000 in current prices from the financial envelope derived from Heading 3 "Security and Citizenship" shall be allocated to finance actions implemented by the European Solidarity Corps in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, which contribute to one or more of the Union priorities in the area of civil protection. The allocation shall be implemented solely in accordance with the Regulation (EU) 2017/XXX, to the exclusion of the specific requirements of Decision No 1313/2013/EU."

Article 32

Entry into force

This Regulation shall enter into force on the day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

It shall apply from 1 January 2018.

This Regulation shall be binding in its entirety and directly applicable in all Member States.

Done at Brussels,

For the European Parliament    For the Council

The President    The President

LEGISLATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENT

1.FRAMEWORK OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

1.1.Title of the proposal/initiative

1.2.Policy area(s) concerned

*1.3.Nature of the proposal/initiative

1.4.Objective(s)

1.5.Grounds for the proposal/initiative

1.6.Duration and financial impact

1.7.Management mode(s) planned

2.MANAGEMENT MEASURES

2.1.Monitoring and reporting rules

2.2.Management and control system

2.3.Measures to prevent fraud and irregularities

3.ESTIMATED FINANCIAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

3.1.Heading(s) of the multiannual financial framework and expenditure budget line(s) affected

3.2.Estimated impact on expenditure 

3.2.1.Summary of estimated impact on expenditure

3.2.2.Estimated impact on operational appropriations

3.2.3.Estimated impact on appropriations of an administrative nature

3.2.4.Compatibility with the current multiannual financial framework

3.2.5.Third-party contributions

3.3.Estimated impact on revenue

LEGISLATIVE FINANCIAL STATEMENT

1.FRAMEWORK OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

1.1.Title of the proposal/initiative

Proposal for a REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL on the European Solidarity Corps 

1.2.Policy area(s) concerned 

Title 15 Education and Culture

1.3.Nature of the proposal/initiative

 The proposal/initiative relates to a new action 

 The proposal/initiative relates to a new action following a pilot project/preparatory action 36  

 The proposal/initiative relates to the extension of an existing action 

 The proposal/initiative relates to an action redirected towards a new action 

1.4.Objective(s)

1.4.1.The Commission's multiannual strategic objective(s) targeted by the proposal/initiative

Education and culture – Jobs and growth

1.4.2.Specific objective(s)

Specific objective No 1:

to provide young people, with the support of participating organisations, with easily accessible opportunities for engagement in solidarity activities while improving their skills and competences for personal, educational, social, civic and professional development, as well as their employability and facilitating transition into the labour market, including by supporting the mobility of young volunteers, trainees and workers.

Specific objective No 2:

to ensure that the solidarity activities that are offered to the European Solidarity Corps participants contribute to addressing concrete, unmet societal needs and strengthening communities, are of high quality and properly validated.

1.4.3.Expected result(s) and impact

Specify the effects which the proposal/initiative should have on the beneficiaries/groups targeted.

The proposal is expected to generate impacts at different levels:

- at the level of individuals participating in the European Solidarity Corps, since they will have the opportunity to participate in a wide-range of solidarity activities as well as to join a Europe-wide community of like-minded fellows. This will enable them to express their solidarity, their commitment and their motivation to contribute to addressing key societal challenges. At the same time, they will have the opportunity to acquire useful experience and develop key skills and competences for their personal and professional development.

- at the level of the organisations participating in the European Solidarity Corps and the communities in which the European Solidarity Corps members operate, since they will benefit from the financial and/or other support of the European Solidarity Corps as well as the help by motivated young people in order to better cope with the challenges they address.

- at the societal level, since solidarity activities address unmet needs, and therefore contribute to strengthening the capacity and resilience of vulnerable communities as well as to enhancing cohesion and solidarity at the level of communities.

1.4.4.Indicators of results and impact

Specify the indicators for monitoring implementation of the proposal/initiative.

Monitoring arrangements will be based on an extensive analysis of the quantitative outputs of the Programme, via dedicated IT systems, which will ease the collection of necessary information about activities and projects implemented. The main output indicators that will be collected will include inter alia:

- number of participants in volunteering placements (in-country and cross-border);

- number of participants in traineeship placements (in-country and cross-border);

- number of participants in job placements (in-country and cross-border);

- number of participants in solidarity projects;

- number of organisations holding a European Solidarity Corps quality label.

At the latest six months after the entry into force of this Regulation, the Commission shall establish a detailed programme for monitoring the outputs, results and impacts of this Regulation.

1.5.Grounds for the proposal/initiative

1.5.1.Requirement(s) to be met in the short or long term

To establish a Corps of motivated young Europeans willing to engage - in their country or abroad - in volunteering activities, traineeships or jobs in solidarity-related areas.

By 2020, to have offered concrete opportunities to 100 000 young Europeans.

To support organisations in carrying out accessible and high quality solidarity activities that are expected to contribute to addressing unmet societal needs, while enhancing young people’s personal, educational, social, civic and professional development.

1.5.2.Added value of Union involvement (it may result from different factors, e.g. coordination gains, legal certainty, greater effectiveness or complementarities). For the purposes of this point 'added value of Union involvement' is the value resulting from Union intervention which is additional to the value that would have been otherwise created by Member States alone.

The European Solidarity Corps will enhance the European dimension to solidarity. It will complement existing public and private policies, programmes and activities and this will not have competition or substitution effects. This complementary effect will be ensured since the Corps will address unmet societal needs, i.e. situations where needs among communities and citizens are – e.g. for reasons of lacking resources – not being met by the labour market or by existing volunteering or other types of solidarity programmes.

1.5.3.Lessons learned from similar experiences in the past

With regard to the volunteering dimension, the European Solidarity Corps will build on the successful model of the European Voluntary Service which has provided a tangible contribution to the development of competences, language learning, fostering of international attitudes and promotion of European values among young people over the last twenty years. Although the European Solidarity Corps will go beyond the European Voluntary Service, by supporting a wider range of activities and introducing administrative simplifications, it will preserve and further enhance the qualitative framework (training, insurance, mentoring and language support, learning dimension for young participants) developed under the European Voluntary Service scheme.

1.5.4.Compatibility and possible synergy with other appropriate instruments

The actions of the European Solidarity Corps will be consistent with and complementary to a variety of relevant EU policies and programmes, such as those relating to education and training, employment, gender equality, entrepreneurship, in particular social entrepreneurship, citizenship and democratic participation, environment and nature protection, climate action, disaster prevention, preparedness and recovery, agriculture and rural development, provision of food and non-food items, health and wellbeing, creativity and culture, physical education and sport, social assistance and welfare, reception and integration of third-country nationals, territorial cooperation and cohesion.

Several EU programmes will be contributing to the overall budget of the European Solidarity Corps as described in section 3 of this document. Other programmes and funds may also contribute to the objectives of the European Solidarity Corps through their specific provisions in accordance with their respective basic acts.


Duration and financial impact

 Proposal/initiative of limited duration

   Proposal/initiative in effect from 01/01/2018 to 31/12/2020

   Financial impact from 2018 to 2023 (post-2020 valid for payment appropriation only).

1.6.Management mode(s) planned 37  

 Direct management by the Commission

by its departments, including by its staff in the Union delegations;

   by the executive agencies

 Shared management with the Member States

1.7. Indirect management by entrusting budget implementation tasks to:

third countries or the bodies they have designated;

international organisations and their agencies (to be specified);

the EIB and the European Investment Fund;

bodies referred to in Articles 208 and 209 of the Financial Regulation;

public law bodies;

bodies governed by private law with a public service mission to the extent that they provide adequate financial guarantees;

bodies governed by the private law of a Member State that are entrusted with the implementation of a public-private partnership and that provide adequate financial guarantees;

persons entrusted with the implementation of specific actions in the CFSP pursuant to Title V of the TEU, and identified in the relevant basic act.

If more than one management mode is indicated, please provide details in the ‘Comments’ section.

Comments

The management of the main actions of the European Solidarity Corps will be conferred to the National Agencies responsible for the implementation of decentralised actions under the Erasmus+ Programme. These bodies will be responsible for actions such as: Quality label and training; Placements; Solidarity projects; Networking activities; Resource centre and certificates for participants.

The European Commission, partially also via the Education, Audio-visual and Culture Executive Agency, will manage actions to provide horizontal services to the European Solidarity Corps participants (i.e. portal, online training, online linguistic support, insurance) as well as a part of actions, such as Quality label, Placements (for certain profiles of organisations or types of placements) and Networking activities (for European level activities).

2.MANAGEMENT MEASURES

2.1.Monitoring and reporting rules

Specify frequency and conditions.

The objective is to use existing arrangements for Erasmus+ as much as possible and to simplify and reduce the administrative burden put on participants and participating organisations.

Consequently, rules for monitoring and reporting will systematically be established in view of their efficiency and cost-effectiveness, based on the experience gained in the Erasmus+ programme, among others.

The use of lump sum and flat rate grants/grants based on unit costs will be generalized to a maximum extent. Reporting and controls will thus focus on the realisation of the financed activity and the achieved results rather than on the eligibility of costs incurred, reducing the workload and scope for error of both programme participants and managing bodies.

Programme beneficiaries (organisations benefiting from the scheme) will supply the necessary management information in their grant application and their reports. Reporting requirements will be proportional to the size of the grant, the duration and complexity of the supported action. Indicators provide a stable basis for the collection and exploitation of data in view of monitoring and reporting.

The actions will be supported with electronic forms for application and reporting by beneficiaries. This will facilitate the collection and exploitation of data for monitoring and reporting, both at national and Union level. The European Commission has at its disposal a wide variety of bespoke IT solutions to facilitate collection and reporting.

2.2.Management and control system

2.2.1.Risk(s) identified

The risks identified in the implementation of the current programmes fall mainly into the following categories:

- errors derived from the inexperience of beneficiaries with the rules: error rates and financial adjustments are expected to be higher in the case of actions with more complex financial management rules, in particular when grants are based on real costs; this is largely mitigated by using simplified costs (lump sums, flat rates and scales of unit costs) as permitted by the Financial Regulation;

- reliability of the control chain and maintenance of the audit trail: the European Solidarity Corps would be managed by a large number of intermediaries, the National Agencies, the audit bodies and the National Authorities. The control framework mitigates these risks and is very well established;

- specific target stakeholders: in particular in the volunteering sector, participants may not have the necessary financial reserves or sophisticated management structures. This lack of formal structure can have an impact on their financial and operational capacity for managing Union funds. Simple formats of actions and simplified costs substantially mitigate this risk in making the rules easy to follow.

2.2.2.Information concerning the internal control system set up

The control system for the initiative will be set up in a manner so as to ensure efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the controls.

The Commission's supervision and performance frameworks will ensure a high level of monitoring and feedback to inform the policy approach;

The European Commission will include the European Solidarity Corps in its programme of Supervisory visits, financial audits, and monitoring and implementation visits, as well as guidance activities such as conferences, kick-off meetings, meetings of National Agencies, training courses and webinars.

As set out in 2.1 above, the main simplification to reduce error rates resulting from the complexity of financial rules will be the wide use of grants in the form of lump sums, flat rates and scales of unit costs, as already successfully implemented in Erasmus+.

Expected results/internal control objective

The control objectives will have the following targets:

Control objective

Target

Control effectiveness as regards legality and regularity

Controls provide reasonable assurance as regards legality and regularity; supervisory controls are effective as regards entrusted bodies;

Multiannual residual error rate for the implementation through National Agencies and EACEA under 2%;

Efficiency and Cost-effectiveness

Overall, the cost of control should be in a low range of between 1 and 5%, depending on the measure used, in line with similar programmes such as Erasmus+. Costs of control should be proportional and cost effective;

Fraud prevention and detection

Suspected irregularities or fraud and ongoing investigations of OLAF followed up via the Commission's existing anti-fraud strategy, with no impact on the assurance over the reporting period;

Other control objectives: safeguarding of assets and information, reliability of reporting

·Entrusted funds appropriately safeguarded;

·Accounting and reporting reliable;

·Budget execution in line with targets.

Reliability of the control chain and audit trail

The following set-up is envisaged for the actions implemented by National Agencies: 

Controls are organised at three levels: by National Agencies, by independent audit bodies designated by the Member States and by the Commission, whereby the Commission will take account of the controls performed by other bodies to ensure cost-efficiency on a multi-annual basis.

While National Agencies will be in charge of primary controls of beneficiaries, their system of internal control and compliance are monitored and supervised by the Member States/National Authorities and audited by an Independent Audit Body. The Commission sets the requirements for the controls at national level to ensure coherence and reliability and supervise the implementation of controls at Member State level. This practice is already well established by the Commission that issues yearly a Guide for National Agencies setting minimum requirements, control objectives and technical guidelines for National Agencies with regard to primary controls of programme beneficiaries. The same applies to the Guidelines for National Authorities, and Independent Audit Bodies.

In order to provide a high quality basis for the annual declaration of assurance by the Director General, a permanent control system consists of the following elements:

   the management declaration of assurance from the National Agency due by 15 February N+1,

   the Independent Audit Opinion due by 15 March N+1,

   the Commission's analysis of the management declaration of assurance and independent audit opinion and feedback thereon to the National Agency and Member State, including formal observations and recommendations in case of non-compliance or underperformance by the National Agency,

   the information from the Member States by 30 October of each year, covering their monitoring and supervision activities on the programme at national level.

Depending on the results of the Commission controls, supervisory visits and audits, it may impose precautionary measures on National Agencies (such as suspension of commitments or payments) as well as corrective measures (notably financial corrections). Both types of measures are already in use and have proved efficient in addressing serious problems of non-compliance and underperformance.

Actions managed by an executive agency (EACEA):

EACEA will manage the actions under direct centralised management, building on its experience in Erasmus+.

The Commission will apply the control measures required for executive agencies in accordance with the Financial Regulation and the Council Regulation (EC) No 58/2003 on executive agencies. This supervision will be integrated in the terms of cooperation between the parent DG and the executive agency and in the semestrial reporting of the Agency as well as the quarterly meetings of the Steering Committee.

The Commission intends to manage only a minimum of actions directly.

Following these simplification measures, the Commission accepts that there will be a residual risk, which is inherent to the political choice to provide Union support to these types of participants in view of the programme objectives.

2.2.3.Estimate of the costs and benefits of the controls and assessment of the expected level of risk of error

Regarding cost effectiveness, the Commission has made an initial estimation of the costs of the resources and inputs required for carrying out the controls and has estimated, in so far as possible, their benefits in terms of the amount of errors and irregularities prevented, detected and corrected by these controls but also in terms of non-quantifiable errors. This approach emphasises the core financial and operational checks of the controls chain.

The control strategy is based on a single integrated control framework in order to provide reasonable assurance throughout the project cycle. The approach taken to assess cost-effectiveness of controls is based on the logic of building blocks of assurance and a single integrated control framework. The Commission differentiates the frequency and the intensity of the controls – in view of the different risk profiles among its current and future transactions and of the cost-effectiveness of its existing and alternative controls, in particular as outlined to National Agencies in the programme implementation guidance. Executive Agencies and all entrusted entities are always responsible for the primary level of controls in order to ensure the protection of the Union’s financial interest, while the Commission is responsible for supervisory controls.

The Commissions estimate is that the global cost of control is low, and in the range 1-5%, depending on the measure used, of the budget managed (Executive Agency's budget excluded). These costs are proportional and cost effective given the likely risk of error if such controls were not in place, and the requirement to ensure an error rate below 2%. Based on the experience with Erasmus+ and its predecessor programmes, which have an error rate of around 1% on a multiannual basis, the expected risk of error is less than 2%.

2.3.Measures to prevent fraud and irregularities

Specify existing or envisaged prevention and protection measures.

The controls aimed at preventing and detecting fraud are not unlike those intended to ensure the legality and regularity of the transactions (the unintentional errors). Each year the Commission reviews all reporting from National Agencies on possible fraud or irregularities. These cases are mainly followed up at national level where the National Agencies have direct access to means of legal redress and referral of fraud cases.

The Commission services contribute to ongoing OLAF investigations and organise the follow-up to completed OLAF investigations. Financial prejudice to the EU budget resulting from fraud established in final OLAF case reports concerning programmes with similar funding rules and stakeholders is low. Cases are referred to OLAF and to IDOC as appropriate, but a significant number of cases are followed up during the year directly with National Agencies and National Authorities, who have direct access to the relevant judicial and anti-fraud entities.

Commission services implementing the action have developed and implemented their own anti-fraud strategy (AFS) since 2014, elaborated on the basis of the methodology provided by OLAF. Regularly updated, it is supplemented with, where appropriate, lower-level procedural documents, covering how cases are referred and followed up.

Considering the level of fraud impact potentially faced by the proposed programme, in particular the financial prejudice recorded by the European Anti-fraud Office, the residual risk of fraud does not justify additional measures. Commission services maintain close cooperation with OLAF and follow the ongoing cases closely. Therefore it is possible to conclude positively on assurance in respect of fraud risk.

3.ESTIMATED FINANCIAL IMPACT OF THE PROPOSAL/INITIATIVE

3.1.Heading(s) of the multiannual financial framework and expenditure budget line(s) affected

·New budget lines requested

In order of multiannual financial framework headings and budget lines.

Heading of multiannual financial framework

Budget line

Type of
expenditure

Contribution

Diff./Non-diff.

from EFTA countries

from candidate countries

from third countries

within the meaning of Article 21(2)(b) of the Financial Regulation

1A

15 01 04 03 Support Expenditure for the European Solidarity Corps

Non diff.

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

1A

15 05 01 European Solidarity Corps

Diff

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

1B

04 02 65 European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from the European Social Fund (ESF)

Diff

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

2

05 04 60 04 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD)

Diff

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

2

07 02 07 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from  the LIFE sub-programme for Environment

Diff

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

2

34 02 05 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from the LIFE sub-programme for Climate Action

Diff

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

3

23 03 01 03 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from Union Civil Protection Mechanism (UCPM)

Diff

NO*

NO*

NO*

NO

* Initially, the participation to the European Solidarity Corps is intended for Member States of the European Union. At a subsequent stage, the participation may be extended to other countries, on the basis of bilateral agreements, as referred to in Article 11 of this legislative proposal.

3.2.Estimated impact on expenditure

Sources of funding for the European Solidarity Corps (in euro million- rounded figures)

2018

2019

2020

TOTAL

Erasmus+, of which:

51,9

69,2

76,6

197,7

15 02 01 01 - Promoting excellence and cooperation in the European education and training area and its relevance to the labour market

2,1

2,1

1,8

5,9

15 02 01 02- Promoting excellence and cooperation in the European youth area and the participation of young people in European democratic life

49,9

67,1

74,8

191,8

European Union Programme for Employment and Social Innovation (EaSI) , of which:

2,5

3,5

4,0

10,0

04 03 02 01- Progress — Supporting the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of Union employment and social policy and working conditions legislation

2,5

3,5

4,0

10,0

The Union Civil Protection Mechanism, of which:

2,0

2,0

2,0

6,0

23 03 01 01- Disaster prevention and preparedness within the Union

2,0

2,0

2,0

6,0

LIFE, of which:

1,5

1,5

1,5

4,5

34 02 03- Better climate governance and information at all levels

0,5

0,5

0,5

1,5

07 02 03- Supporting better environmental governance and information at all levels

1,0

1,0

1,0

3,0

European Social Fund (ESF)*

11,1

12,1

11,8

35,0

European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) *

1,8

1,8

Unallocated margin under Heading 1a (including Global Margin for Commitments)

18,4

30,5

37,7

86,5

Total Contribution to European Solidarity Corps

89,2

118,7

133,6

341,5

* The contribution from EAFRD and ESF comes from the overall technical assistance envelope included in the financial programming and not yet allocated.

3.2.1.Summary of estimated impact on expenditure

EUR million (to three decimal places)

Heading of multiannual financial
framework

1A

European Solidarity Corps

DG: EAC

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

Subsequent years

TOTAL

• Operational appropriations

15 05 01 European Solidarity Corps

Commitments

(1)

68,236

98,596

114,368

0,000

281,200

Payments

(2)

51,177

97,454

110,484

22,085

281,200

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of specific programmes 38  

 

 

 

15 01 04 03 Support Expenditure for the European Solidarity Corps

(3)

4,550

4,550

3,900

0,000

13,000

TOTAL appropriations
for DG EAC

Commitments

=1+1a +3

72,786

103,146

118,268

0,000

294,200

Payments

=2+2a

+3

55,727

102,004

114,384

22,085

294,200



TOTAL operational appropriations H1A

Commitments

(4)

68,236

98,596

114,368

0,000

281,200

Payments

(5)

51,177

97,454

110,484

22,085

281,200

• TOTAL appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope for specific programmes

(6)

4,550

4,550

3,900

0,000

13,000 

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADING 1A

of the multiannual financial framework
(Prime reference amount)

Commitments

=4+ 6

72,786

103,146

118,268

0.000

294,200

Payments

=5+ 6

55,727

102,004

114,384

22,085

294,200

Heading of multiannual financial
framework

1B

European Solidarity Corps

DG: EAC

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

Subsequent years

TOTAL

• Operational appropriations

04 02 65 European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from the European Social Fund (ESF)

Commitments

(1)

11,102

12,078

11,820

0,000

35,000

Payments

(2)

8,327

12,487

11,810

2,377

35,000

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of specific programmes 39  

(3)

TOTAL appropriations
for DG EAC

Commitments

=1+1a +3

11,102

12,078

11,820

0,000

35,000

Payments

=2+2a

+3

8,327

12,487

11,810

2,377

35,000



TOTAL operational appropriations H1B

Commitments

(4)

11,102

12,078

11,820

0,000

35,000

Payments

(5)

8,327

12,487

11,810

2,377

35,000

• TOTAL appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope for specific programmes

(6)

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADING 1B

of the multiannual financial framework

Commitments

=4+ 6

11,102

12,078

11,820

0,000

35,000

Payments

=5+ 6

8,327

12,487

11,810

2,377

35,000

Heading of multiannual financial
framework

2

European Solidarity Corps

DG: EAC

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

Subsequent years

TOTAL

• Operational appropriations

05 04 60 04 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD)

Commitments

(1)

1,800

0,000

0,000

0,000

1,800

Payments

(2)

1,350

0,360

0,090

0,000

1,800

07 02 07 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from  the LIFE sub-programme for Environment

Commitments

(1)

1,000

1,000

1,000

0,000

3,000

Payments

(2)

0,750

1,050

1,000

0,200

3,000

34 02 05 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from the LIFE sub-programme for Climate Action

Commitments

(1)

0,500

0,500

0,500

0,000

1,500

Payments

(2)

0,375

0,525

0,500

0,100

1,500

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of specific programmes 40  

(3)

TOTAL appropriations
for DG EAC

Commitments

=1+1a +3

3,300

1,500

1,500

0,000

6,300

Payments

=2+2a

+3

2,475

1,935

1,590

0,300

6,300



TOTAL operational appropriations H2

Commitments

(4)

3,300

1,500

1,500

0,000

6,300

Payments

(5)

2,475

1,935

1,590

0,300

6,300

• TOTAL appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope for specific programmes

(6)

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADING 2

of the multiannual financial framework

Commitments

=4+ 6

3,300

1,500

1,500

0,000

6,300

Payments

=5+ 6

2,475

1,935

1,590

0,300

6,300

Heading of multiannual financial
framework

3

European Solidarity Corps

DG: EAC

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

Subsequent years

TOTAL

• Operational appropriations

23 03 01 03 - European Solidarity Corps – Contribution from Union Civil Protection Mechanism (UCPM)

Commitments

(1)

2,000

2,000

2,000

0,000

6,000

Payments

(2)

1,500

2,100

2,000

0,400

6,000

Appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope of specific programmes 41  

(3)

TOTAL appropriations
for DG EAC

Commitments

=1+1a +3

2,000

2,000

2,000

0,000

6,000

Payments

=2+2a

+3

1,500

2,100

2,000

0,400

6,000



TOTAL operational appropriations H3

Commitments

(4)

2,000

2,000

2,000

0,000

6,000

Payments

(5)

1,500

2,100

2,000

0,400

6,000

• TOTAL appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope for specific programmes

(6)

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADING 3

of the multiannual financial framework

Commitments

=4+ 6

2,000

2,000

2,000

0,000

6,000

Payments

=5+ 6

1,500

2,100

2,000

0,400

6,000

If more than one heading is affected by the proposal / initiative:

• TOTAL operational appropriations

Commitments

(4)

84,638

114,174

129,688

0,000

328,500

Payments

(5)

63,479

113,976

125,884

25,162

328,500

• TOTAL appropriations of an administrative nature financed from the envelope for specific programmes

(6)

4,550

4,550

3,900

0,000

13,000

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADINGS 1 to 4
of the multiannual financial framework

(Prime reference amount plus contributions from other programmes)

Commitments

=4+ 6

89,188

118,724

133,588

0,000

341,500

Payments

=5+ 6

68,029

118,526

129,784

25,162

341,500



Heading of multiannual financial
framework

5

‘Administrative expenditure’

EUR million (to three decimal places)

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

TOTAL

DG: EAC

• Human resources (contractual agents)

0,525

0,385

0,350

.

1,260

• Other administrative expenditure

TOTAL DG EAC

Appropriations

0,525

0,385

0,350

1,260

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADING 5
of the multiannual financial framework
 

(Total commitments = Total payments)

0,525

0,385

0,350

1,260

EUR million (to three decimal places)

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

Subsequent years

TOTAL

TOTAL appropriations
under HEADINGS 1 to 5
of the multiannual financial framework
 

Commitments

89,713

119,109

133,938

0,000

342,760

Payments

68,554

118,911

130,134

25,162

342,760

3.2.2.Estimated impact on operational appropriations

   The proposal/initiative does not require the use of operational appropriations

   The proposal/initiative requires the use of operational appropriations, as explained below:

Commitment appropriations in EUR million for column “Cost” (to three decimal places)

Indicate objectives and outputs

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

TOTAL

OUTPUTS

Type

Average cost

No

Cost

No

Cost

No

Cost

Total No

Total cost

- Output

Participants in volunteering placements

3 264

12 500

40,790

17 500

57,105

20 000

65,295

50 000

163,190

- Output

Participants in traineeship and job placements

2 253

4 500

10,364

6 500

14,509

7 400

16,590

18 400

41,463

- Output

Participants in solidarity projects

1 203

3 800

4,570

5 400

6,400

6 000

7,312

15 200

18,282

- Output

Participants in networking activities

199

17 500

3,484

24 500

4,876

28 000

5,574

70 000

13,934

- Output

Participants receiving general online training

47

21 500

2,400

30 000

1,000

34 500

0,600

86 000

4,000

- Output

Participants in cross-border placements receiving specific training

1 000

8 934

8,934

15 635

15,635

20 101

20,101

44 670

44,670

- Output

Participants in cross-border placements receiving online linguistic support

45

13 880

0,625

19 435

0,875

22 215

0,999

55 530

2,499

- Output

Participants enrolled in the European Solidarity Corps insurance

250

16 143

4,035

22 600

5,650

25 827

6,458

64 570

16,143

- Output

Participants receiving a certificate

6

17 200

0,100

34 400

0,200

34 400

0,200

86 000

0,500

- Output

Organisations receiving a quality label

411

4 000

1,849

4 000

1,437

2 000

0,822

10 000

4,108

- Output

European Solidarity Corps Portal

4 000 000

1

2,000

1

1,000

1

1,000

1

4,000

- Output

Resource Centre

400 000

1

0,128

1

0,128

1

0,144

1

0,400

- Output

National Agencies receiving a Management fee

546 821

28

5,359

28

5,359

28

4,593

28

15,311

TOTAL COST

84,638

114,174

129,688

328,500

3.2.3.Estimated impact on appropriations of an administrative nature

3.2.3.1.Summary

   The proposal/initiative does not require the use of appropriations of an administrative nature

   The proposal/initiative requires the use of appropriations of an administrative nature, as explained below:

EUR million (to three decimal places)

YEAR

2018

YEAR

2019

YEAR

2020

TOTAL

HEADING 5
of the multiannual financial framework

Human resources

0,525

0,385

0,350

1,260

Other administrative expenditure

Subtotal HEADING 5
of the multiannual financial framework

0,525

0,385

0,350

1,260

Outside HEADING 5 42
of the multiannual financial framework

Human resources

Other expenditure
of an administrative nature

Subtotal
outside HEADING 5
of the multiannual financial framework

TOTAL

0,525

0,385

0,350

1,260

The appropriations required for human resources and other expenditure of an administrative nature will be met by appropriations from the DG that are already assigned to management of the action and/or have been redeployed within the DG, together if necessary with any additional allocation which may be granted to the managing DG under the annual allocation procedure and in the light of budgetary constraints.

3.2.3.2.Estimated requirements of human resources

   The proposal/initiative does not require the use of human resources.

   The proposal/initiative requires the use of human resources, as explained below:

Estimate to be expressed in full time equivalent units

Year
2018

Year
2019

Year 2020

Enter as many years as necessary to show the duration of the impact (see point 1.6)

• Establishment plan posts (officials and temporary staff)

XX 01 01 01 (Headquarters and Commission’s Representation Offices)

30

30

30

XX 01 01 02 (Delegations)

XX 01 05 01 (Indirect research)

10 01 05 01 (Direct research)

External staff (in Full Time Equivalent unit: FTE) 43

XX 01 02 01 (AC, END, INT from the ‘global envelope’)

7,5

5,5

5

XX 01 02 02 (AC, AL, END, INT and JED in the delegations)

XX 01 04 yy  44

- at Headquarters

- in Delegations

XX 01 05 02 (AC, END, INT - Indirect research)

10 01 05 02 (AC, END, INT - Direct research)

Other budget lines (specify)

TOTAL

37,5

35,5

35

XX is the policy area or budget title concerned.

The human resources required will be met by staff from the DG who are already assigned to management of the action and/or have been redeployed within the DG, together if necessary with any additional allocation which may be granted to the managing DG under the annual allocation procedure and in the light of budgetary constraints.

Description of tasks to be carried out:

Officials and temporary staff

Programme management

External staff

Programme management

3.2.4.Compatibility with the current multiannual financial framework

   The proposal is compatible with the current multiannual financial framework and may entail the use of special instruments as defined in Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 45 .

   The proposal/initiative will entail reprogramming of the relevant heading in the multiannual financial framework.

Explain what reprogramming is required, specifying the budget lines concerned and the corresponding amounts.

   The proposal/initiative requires application of the flexibility instrument or revision of the multiannual financial framework.

Explain what is required, specifying the headings and budget lines concerned and the corresponding amounts.

3.2.5.Third-party contributions

The proposal/initiative does not provide for co-financing by third parties.

The proposal/initiative may provide for the co-financing estimated below 46 :

Appropriations in EUR million (to three decimal places)

Year
2018

Year
2019

Year
2020

Total

Specify the co-financing body 

p.m.

p.m.

p.m.

p.m.

TOTAL appropriations co-financed

p.m.

p.m.

p.m.

p.m.


Estimated impact on revenue

   The proposal/initiative has no financial impact on revenue.

   The proposal/initiative has the following financial impact:

   on own resources

   on miscellaneous revenue

EUR million (to three decimal places)

Budget revenue line:

Appropriations available for the current financial year

Impact of the proposal/initiative 47

Year
2018

Year
2019

Year
2020

 

Article ………….

For miscellaneous ‘assigned’ revenue, specify the budget expenditure line(s) affected.

Specify the method for calculating the impact on revenue.

(1) http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2017/03/25-rome-declaration/
(2) European Commission (2016), A European Solidarity Corps, Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, COM(2016) 942 final of 7.12.2016.
(3) The Erasmus+ programme, the Employment and Social Innovation programme (EaSI), the LIFE programme, the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund, the Health Programme, the Europe for Citizens programme, the European Regional Development Fund (through Interreg) and the Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
(4) http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/meetings/european-council/2016/12/20161215-euco-conclusions-final_pdf/
(5) "A Union that delivers swifter and better results: Three Institutions sign Joint Declaration on the EU's legislative priorities for 2017", IP/16/4360.
(6) Participants in the European Solidarity Corps fulfil residence conditions in their host country in line with EU law.
(7) Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing 'Erasmus+': the Union programme for education, training, youth and sport and repealing Decisions No 1719/2006/EC, No 1720/2006/EC and No 1298/2008/EC, OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 50.
(8) The European Solidarity Corps is a priority for the Commission in its 2017 EU Citizenship Report, COM(2017) 30 final/2 of 31.01.2017.
(9) Erasmus+ programme, Employment and Social Innovation programme, European Social Fund, Union Civil Protection Mechanism, LIFE programme, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
(10) such as, but not limited to, the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund, the Europe for Citizens programme, the European Regional Development Fund, the Health programme.
(11) http://ec.europa.eu/justice/fundamental-rights/charter/index_en.htm" (2012/C 326/02) (OJ C 326, 26.10.2012, p. 391).
(12) Council Regulation (EC) No 58/2003 of 19 December 2002 laying down the statute for executive agencies to be entrusted with certain tasks in the management of Community programmes, OJ L 011, 16.01.2003, p.1.
(13) Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 2011 laying down the rules and general principles concerning the mechanisms for control by Member States of the Commission's exercise of implementing powers, OJ L 55, 28.2.2011, p.13.
(14) OJ C […], […], p. […].
(15) OJ C […], […], p. […].
(16) Position of the European Parliament of ... (not yet published in the Official Journal) and Decision of the Council of ... (not yet published in the Official Journal).
(17) The State of the Union 2016: Towards a Better Europe – A Europe that Protects, Empowers and Defends, IP/16/3042 (http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-16-3042_en.htm).
(18) Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions A European Solidarity Corps, COM(2016) 942 final of 7.12.2016.
(19) Council Recommendation of 22 April 2013 on establishing a Youth Guarantee (2013/C 120/01).
(20) Regulation (EU) No 1288/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 establishing 'Erasmus+': the Union programme for education, training, youth and sport and repealing Decisions No 1719/2006/EC, No 1720/2006/EC and No 1298/2008/EC, OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 50.
(21) Council Recommendation of 10 March 2014 on a Quality Framework for Traineeships, OJ C 88, 27.3.2014, p. 1.
(22) Council Recommendation of 20 December 2012 on the validation of non-formal and informal learning, OJ C 398, 22.12.2012, p. 1.
(23) Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management, OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(24) Individuals from an overseas country or territory (OCT) and competent public and /or private bodies and institutions from an OCT may participate in the programmes in accordance with Council Decision 2001/822/EC of 27 November 2001 on the association of the overseas countries and territories with the European Community, OJ L314, 30.11.2001, p.1.
(25) Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 2011 laying down the rules and general principles concerning mechanisms for control by Member States of the Commission’s exercise of implementing powers, O.J. L 55, 28.2.2011, p.13.
(26) Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002, OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(27) Regulation (EU) No 1293/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 December 2013 on the establishment of a Programme for the Environment and Climate Action (LIFE) and repealing Regulation (EC) No 614/2007 (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 185).
(28) Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 laying down common provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and laying down general provisions on the European Regional Development Fund, the European Social Fund, the Cohesion Fund and the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 1083/2006 (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p.320).
(29) Regulation (EU) No 1305/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 on support for rural development by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and repealing Council Regulation (EC) No 1698/2005 (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 487).
(30) Regulation (EU) No 1306/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 on the financing, management and monitoring of the common agricultural policy and repealing Council Regulations (EEC) No 352/78, (EC) No 165/94, (EC) No 2799/98, (EC) No 814/2000, (EC) No 1290/2005 and (EC) No 485/2008 (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 549).
(31) Decision No 1313/2013/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 on a Union Civil Protection Mechanism, (OJ L347 20.12.2013, p. 924).
(32) As a general principle, an activity carried out continuously, 5 days a week for 7 hours a day.
(33) This financial envelope constitutes the prime reference amount within the meaning of point 17 of the Interinstitutional Agreement (2013/C 373/01) between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management.
(34) Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 1268/2012 of 29 October 2012 on the rules of application of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, OJ L 362, 31.12.2012, p. 1.
(35) Council Regulation (Euratom, EC) No 2185/96 of 11 November 1996 concerning on-the-spot checks and inspections carried out by the Commission in order to protect the European Communities' financial interests against fraud and other irregularities, OJ L 292, 15.11.1996, p. 2.
(36) As referred to in Article 54(2)(a) or (b) of the Financial Regulation.
(37) Details of management modes and references to the Financial Regulation may be found on the BudgWeb site: https://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/budgweb/EN/man/budgmanag/Pages/budgmanag.aspx  
(38) Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.
(39) Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.
(40) Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.
(41) Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.
(42) Technical and/or administrative assistance and expenditure in support of the implementation of EU programmes and/or actions (former ‘BA’ lines), indirect research, direct research.
(43) AC= Contract Staff; AL = Local Staff; END= Seconded National Expert; INT = agency staff; JED= Junior Experts in Delegations.
(44) Sub-ceiling for external staff covered by operational appropriations (former ‘BA’ lines).
(45) Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020 (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p.884).
(46) As stated in section 3.1, initially, the participation to the European Solidarity Corps is intended for Member States of the European Union. At a subsequent stage, the participation may be extended to other countries, on the basis of bilateral agreements, as referred to in Article 11 of this legislative proposal.
(47) As regards traditional own resources (customs duties, sugar levies), the amounts indicated must be net amounts, i.e. gross amounts after deduction of 25 % for collection costs.
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