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Document 31997D0266

Title and reference
97/266/EC: Commission Decision of 18 December 1996 concerning a site information format for proposed Natura 2000 sites

OJ L 107, 24.4.1997, p. 1–156 (ES, DA, DE, EL, EN, FR, IT, NL, PT, FI, SV)
Special edition in Czech: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Estonian: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Latvian: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Lithuanian: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Hungarian Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Maltese: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Polish: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Slovak: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Slovene: Chapter 15 Volume 003 P. 162 - 317
Special edition in Bulgarian: Chapter 15 Volume 004 P. 3 - 158
Special edition in Romanian: Chapter 15 Volume 004 P. 3 - 158

ELI: http://data.europa.eu/eli/dec/1997/266/oj
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Text

24.4.1997   

EN

Official Journal of the European Communities

L 107/1


COMMISSION DECISION

of 18 December 1996

concerning a site information format for proposed Natura 2000 sites

(97/266/EC)

THE COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES,

Having regard to the Treaty establishing the European Community,

Having regard to Council Directive 92/43/EEC of 21 May 1996 on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora (1), as amended by the Act of Accession of Austria, Finland and Sweden, and in particular to the second subparagraph of Article 4 (1) thereof,

Whereas the second subparagraph of Article 4 (1) of Directive 92/43/EEC provides that Member States are to transmit to the Commission the list of proposed Natura 2000 sites referred to in the first subparagraph of that Article 4 (1), together with information on each site, in a format established by the Commission in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 21;

Whereas for each Natura 2000 site proposed, the format needs to provide for a map of the site, name, location, extent and the data resulting from application of the criteria used in selecting the site;

Whereas the measures provided for in this Decision are in accordance with the opinion of the Committee set up pursuant to Article 20 of Directive 92/43/EEC,.

HAS ADOPTED THIS DECISION:

Article 1

The format for the transmission of information under the second subparagraph of Article 4 (1) of Directive 92/43/EEC, contained in the Annex to this Decision, is adopted.

Article 2

This Decision is addressed to the Member States.

Done at Brussels, 18 December 1996.

For the Commission

Ritt BJERREGAARD

Member of the Commission


(1)  OJ No L 206, 22. 7. 1992, p. 7.


ANNEX

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NATURA 2000

STANDARD DATA FORM

EXPLANATORY NOTES

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction 21

1.

SITE IDENTIFICATION 24

1.1

Site type (obligatory) 24

1.2

Site code (obligatory) 24

1.3

Form compilation date (obligatory) 24

1.4

Update (obligatory) 24

1.5

Relations with other described sites (obligatory if relation exists) 25

1.6

Respondent (obligatory) 25

1.7

Site name (obligatory) 25

1.8

Site indication and designation dates (obligatory) 25

2.

SITE LOCATION 25

2.1

Site-centre location (obligatory) 25

2.2

Site Surface Area (obligatory) 26

2.3

Site length 26

2.4

Altitude (to be supplied where relevant) 26

2.5

Administrative Region Code, Name and percentage cover within each region (obligatory) 26

2.6

Biogeographic region 26

3.

ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION 28

3.1

Habitat types present on the site and site assessment for them 28

3.2

Species referred to in Article 4 of Council Directive 79/409/EEC and species listed in Annex II of Council Directive 92/43/EEC and site evaluation for them 31

3.3

Other important species of flora and fauna 34

4.

SITE DESCRIPTION 34

4.1

General site character (obligatory) 35

4.2

Quality and importance (obligatory) 35

4.3

Vulnerability (obligatory) 35

4.4

Site designation (to be supplied where relevant) 35

4.5

Ownership (to be supplied where relevant) 35

4.6

Documentation 35

4.7

History (not to be filled in) 35

5.

SITE PROTECTION AND RELATION WITH CORINE BIOTOPE SITES 36

5.1

Protection status at national and regional level (Appendix D) (obligatory) 36

5.2

Sites to which this site is related (neighbouring sites and sites belonging to different designation types) (to be supplied where relevant) 36

5.3

Relation of the described site with Corine biotop sites 36

6.

INFORMATION ON IMPACTS AND ACTIVITIES IN AND AROUND THE SITE 37

6.1

General impacts and proportion of the surface area of the site affected (Appendix E) (to be supplied where relevant) 37

6.2

Site Management 37

7.

MAP OF THE SITE (obligatory) 37

8.

SLIDES AND OTHER PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIAL (to be supplied where relevant) 38

Introduction

Central to the success of Natura 2000 is the level of information, on habitats and species of Community interest which will be assembled during the coming years. Experience in data collection in Europe has been build up through the Corine biotopes projects, which at present describes over 6 000 sites in the European Union. The base for the core data fields incorporates this experience, amended and expanded in the framework of the directives concerned.

As the sites classified under the ‘birds’ and the ‘habitats’ Directives will together form Natura 2000, a common baseline for both types is essential to achieve the objective of creating a coherent network. The data-entry form takes all aspects of both Directives into account and there is only a need for one form. All data fields from the existing data sheet for the ‘birds’ Directive are fully compatible with the new entry form. So, where the data from the 1 100 Special Protection Areas (SPAs) exist, they can be transferred automatically.

Therefore, this form will be used for all sites designated as SPAs under the ‘birds’ Directive. As regards the ‘habitats’ Directive it will initially be used to supply the necessary information for sites eligible for identification as sites of Community importance (SCIs) in application of Article 4 (1) of the Directive (Stage 1) to be completed by June 1995.

The legal basis for providing the data to implement this phase of Natura 2000 is outlined in Article 4 of the Habitats Directive which defines that ‘information shall include a map of the site, its name, location, extent and the data resulting from application of the criteria specified in Annex III (Stage 1) provided in a format established by the Commission in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 21. under Article 4 (3) of the ‘birds’ Directive Member States are already required to ‘send the Commission all relevant information so that it may take appropriate initiatives with a view to the coordination necessary to ensure that the areas provided for in paragraph 1 and 2 (of Article 4) form a coherent whole which meets the protection requirements of these species in the geographical sea and land area where the Directive applies’.

The main objectives of the database are:

1.

to provide the necessary information to enable the Commission, in partnership with the Member States, to coordinate measures to create a coherent Natura 2000 network and to evaluate its effectiveness for the conservation of Annex I habitats and for the habitats of species listed in Annex II of Council Directive 92/43/EEC as well as the habitats of Annex I bird species and other migratory bird species covered by Council Directive 79/409/EEC.

2.

to provide information which will assist the Commission in other decision making capacities to ensure that the Nature 2000 network is fully considered in other policy areas and sectors of the Commission's activities in particular regional, agricultural, energy, transport and tourism policies.

3.

to assist the Commission and the relevant committees in choosing actions for funding under Life and other financial instruments where data relevant to the conservation of sites, such as ownership and management practice, are likely to facilitate the decision making process.

4.

to provide a useful forum for the exchange and sharing of information on habitats and species of Community interest to the benefit of all Member States.

This document illustrates all elements which are part of the form. In addition, some elements will be subject of a user ‘user manual’ in particular as to the interpretation of priority habitat types.

The form is being designed with a view to paper records and computerized entry and transfer of data.

Those data fields which must be filled in at the stage of identifying sites eligible as SCIs are shown as bold italics in the recording form and indicated as ‘obligatory’ in the relevant sections of the explanatory notes. These fields are also obligatory for SPAs. As regards the ecological information requirements this is further clarified in Section 3 of the explanatory notes.

The other fields should be filled in at the stage of classification as SPA or designation as SAC where the information is relevant to the conservation and management of the site. These fields are indicated in the explanatory notes as ‘to be supplied where relevant’.

It is expected that all information relevant for the purposes of site designation or classification will be indicated. This includes, in particular, the information related to the justification of the site in question and to enable evaluation of its contribution to the effectiveness and coherence of the Natura 2000 network. Additional relevant information should be provided as soon as possible. Nevertheless, for sites definitively included in the Natura 2000 network, it is desirable to fill all fields since the information fields included in the form have been limited to those estimated as being of major importance for site protection and monitoring, both at national and Community levels.

In consultation with the relevant authorities, it is hoped to develop the Natura 2000 database system in a format that will be compatible with the information gathered under international agreements and convention, such as biogenetic reserves and the European diploma of the Council of Europe.

Note that in addition to the habitat recording within each site, the Member States will have to supply, pursuant to Annex III of the ‘habitats’ Directive, the total area covered by each habitat type within their country, and that in addition to the population data within each site, an overall estimate of population figures within each national territory is needed for annex III analysis. This information, as well as information on bird populations, will be subject of separate files. A database is at present being established under the auspices of the Ornis Committee to compile ddta on bird populations in each region of the Community.

Figure 1

Possible relationships between sites

Image

Natura 2000 data-entry form and database

One form type is to be used for all sites included in this stage of the development of Natura 2000 to cover classified Special Protection Areas (SPAs) and those sites that are eligible as sites of Community importance (SCI). There may be cases where a relationship exists between two, or more Natura 2000 sites. Figure 1 outlines the different possible relationships that can exist between two Natura 2000 sites. In cases where an overlap exists between two sites or where one of them is within the other, there will be a need to complete two separate forms. This is due to the different legal implications arising from the different designation types.

1.   SITE IDENTIFICATION

1.1.   Site type (obligatory)

This one-character code takes into account the possible relations between proposed eligible Sites of Community Importance (SCI) and classified Special Protection Sites (SPA). Each of these codes (from A to K) corresponds to a particular relation as outlined in Figure 1. Where a relationship exists with more than one other site use the code which defines the predominant relationship. The code also automatically allows identification of the site type (whether it is SPA, eligible as SCI or both).

1.2.   Site code (obligatory)

In a relational database, each site is recognized by a unique code which forms the key-item within the database. The unique site code comprises nine characters and consists of two components:

1.

the first two codes are the country codes

AT

Austria

BE

Belgium

DE

Germany

DK

Denmark

ES

Spain

FI

Finland

FR

France

GR

Greece

IE

Ireland

IT

Italy

LU

Luxembourg

NL

The Netherlands

PT

Portugal

SE

Sweden

UK

United Kingdom

2.

the remaining seven characters, which serve to create a unique alphanumeric code for each site, are to be given following a logical and coherent system defined by the responsible national authority.

Note that there may also be a relation between the described site and those identified as Corine Biotopes Sites. This information is to be given in Section 5 of the form which deals with relations with other designated areas (optional).

1.3.   Form compilation date (obligatory)

Enter the date you wish to see as the ‘compilation date’ for the information recorded. The data field takes the form of the year (four digits) followed by the month in numeric form (two digits).

Example: 1.99305: data first compiled in May 1993.

1.4.   Update (obligatory)

Enter the date when the information reported for the site was last changed, using the same format as for ‘Date’. In the case of a record of a new site leave the ‘update’ field as six spaces. Where the information has been updated several times this field contains the date the information was changed most recently. Intermediate updates are stored in the ‘history field’, together with the nature of the change (see 3.7).

1.5.   Relations with other described sites (obligatory if relation exists)

This field provides a cross-reference to all related described sites for which the Natura 2000 form is being used: proposed eligible sites of Community importance (SCI) and classified special protection areas (SPA) (and in the future will be used for sites designated as special areas of conservation). Give the site code of each related site.

1.6.   Respondent (obligatory)

Enter here the name, affiliation and address of the individual or organization providing the information contained in the record. If major parts of the information have been supplied by more than one individual or organization, each one of them will be entered, together with their own name, affiliation and address.

1.7.   Site name (obligatory)

Sites names are entered in their local language. In this way, difficult translation is avoided and integration of existing data on the national or local level is straightforward. In the case of different characters (e.g. Greek), names are transliterated.

1.8.   Site indication and designation dates (obligatory)

Four dates can be involved, the date the site is proposed as eligible for identification as a site of Community importance (SCI), the date the site is confirmed as a SCI, and two designation dates (SAC and SPA), there is a need to store the date for each one of them. Four sub-fields will indicate the year and month the site was proposed as eligible for identification as a site of Community importance (SCI), the date the site is confirmed as a SCI, the date the site has officially been listed by the Member States as a special protection area, and/or finally the date it was designated as a special area of conservation. Where a site has been designated and subsequently enlarged, the year of initial listing is presented and the most recent total area is given.

2.   SITE LOCATION

2.1.   Site-centre location (obligatory)

The geographical coordinates (longitude and latitude) of the site centre must be entered in degrees, minutes and seconds of arc. Degrees, minutes and seconds of longitude west of the meridian of Greenwich are conventionally given a negative value, and degrees east a positive value, which can be confirmed with a + sign or taken as understood if the sign is replaced with a space. This avoids coordinate problems if data are subsequently transferred to a geographical information system (GIS).

For sites composed of several distinct areas, the coordinates of the most important sub-area is entered.

Almost all countries use different scales, projection types and parameters for the production of topographic maps. Being the most important source for coordinate identification such alternative coordinate systems (UTM, Lambert Conformal or Azimuthal, Gauss-Kruger, etc.) are acceptable for recording site locations on the condition that the projection type and parameters are indicated in section 7 (map of the site). These coordinate references will be converted in a GIS to degrees of longitude and latitude for storage in the final database.

Although site-centre coordinates are missing in almost all source documents please make the extra effort to fill in this field accurately. It is the key to mapping and overlay procedures with other thematic data layers (such as Land Cover, soil type, land use, air quality, ...). Anyone transferring data to the central database and who wants to use an alternative coordinate system will have to talk to the competent Commission service. Once coordinates are accurately recorded information on other data fields can be filled in an automatic way, without lengthy procedures.

If site boundaries are transferred in digital way this field can be automatically calculated as the central point of the polygons.

2.2.   Site surface area (obligatory)

The surface area of a site is entered in hectares. Although it is an obligatory field, the value of -99 is given to sites for which the area is still unknown. A value of 0 can be correct if the site is a cave or cliff. In this case the field 2.3. is obligatory.

When the area of the site has changed over time, the most recent total area is entered.

2.3.   Site length (obligatory if 2.2. {attention} 0)

This field is only obligatory when area measurements are not relevant (e.g. caves, cliffs). Site length is entered in kilometres.

When the length of the site has changed over time, the most recent total length is entered.

2.4.   Altitude (to be supplied where relevant)

Enter the altitude of the site above sea level in three sub-fields which record the minimum, maximum and mean altitude within the site boundaries. It is also important to record negative (below sea-level) values where they exist. The mean value should be calculated as the weighted average of the altitude classes within the site. In order to calculate altitude data in an automatic way, using an existing digital elevation model (DEM) in a G1S system, it is extremely important to spend more time to accurately record site co-ordinates and boundaries. Such a model will become available for use within the Commission through the Eurostat Gisco-project.

2.5.   Administrative region code, name and percentage cover within each region (obligatory)

Eurostat has developed a standard hierarchical coding system for the regions of the European Community to reference statistical data. This coding system must be applied to all regional coding applications in the Commission. A full description can be found in the publication of Eurostat and Appendix A.

The NUTS-codes are entered for each site, together with the percentage of the site within each region. One code is obligatory. Where a site is split over different regions, as many codes as regions which are involved are entered in the database at the most detailed level (5 characters). The Region name is required for cross-check.

Where boundary information exists in digital form the percentage cover of the site in different NUTS regions can be calculated in digital form.

Where sites include a marine component that is not covered by the NUTS system, the % area of the site within this component should be noted as well.

2.6.   Biogeographic region(s) (obligatory)

With reference to the map of the biographic regions (Figure 2: Doc. Hab 95/10) indicate in which region(s) the sites occurs by marking the appropriate boxes.

Figure 2

Map of biogeographic regions (Doc. Hab 95/10)

Image

3.   ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

For the establishment of the list of sites of Community importance (SCI) under Directive 92/43/EEC

Member States must provide the relevant information on the habitat types of Annex I (section 3.1) and for the species of flora and fauna of Annex II (sections 3.2.c to 3.2.g).

In the final phase of designation or classification of the site listed under either Directive all the ecological information necessary to enable evaluation of the contribution of the site to the overall effectiveness and coherence of the Natura 2000 network must be provided.

For sites classified or to be classified as special protection areas (SPA)

all the relevant information on Annex I species (section 3.2.a) and migratory species not included in Annex I (section 3.2.b) is obligatory,

information concerning the habitats of Annex I (section 3.1) and the species of fauna and flora of Annex II (Sections 3.2.c to 3.2.g) must also be provided for all or that part of the site if it is also recognized as of Community importance pursuant to Council Directive 92/43/EEC or simultaneously designated as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC),

all other relevant information on species of fauna and flora (section 3.3) is desirable,

in the case of a site being classified as a SPA, and not being recognised in total or in part as being of Community importance under Council Directive 92/43/EEC, but yet for which certain information on natural habitats or on species of fauna and flora is relevant for the conservation of the bird species for which the SPA was classified this information is desirable.

For sites to be designated as special areas of conservation (SAC)

all relevant information concerning the types of habitats of Annex I (section 3.1) and the species of fauna and flora of Annex II (sections 3.2.c to 3.2.g) is obligatory,

all relevant information concerning bird species of Annex I and migratory species pursuant to Council Directive 79/409/EEC (sections 3.2.a and 3.2.b) must be provided for all or that part of the site which is simultaneously classified or to be classified as a SPA,

all other relevant information on species of fauna and flora (section 3.3) is desirable.

3.1.   Habitat types present on the site and site assessment for them

(i)   Codes and % cover of habitats

—   Annex I habitat types: codes and their % cover within the site (Appendix B)

Enter here the code of the habitat types of Annex I of Directive 92/43/EEC, as indicated in Appendix B. This four character code follows the hierarchical presentation of the habitat types in Annex I of the Directive. All Annex I habitats occurring in the specific site must be entered, with the % cover (linked to criteria A(b) of Annex III of the Directive).

Example: 4110/005: 5 % of the site is covered by Annex I habitat type number 4110.

(ii)   Site assessment criteria for a given natural habitat type in Annex I (in accordance with section A of Annex III)

—   REPRESENTATIV1TY: = A(a) of Annex III: degree of representativity of the habitat type on the site.

Criterion A(a) of Annex III should be linked to the interpretation manual of Annex I habitat types since this manual provides a definition, a list of characteristic species and other relevant elements. The degree of representativity gives a measure of ‘how typical’ a habitat type is. If need be, this assessment should likewise take into account the representativity of the habitat type concerned on the site in question, either for a group of habitat types or for a particular combination of different habitat types.

If the field data, namely quantitative data, for the comparison do not exist or if measurement of the criterion is not feasible, the ‘best expert judgment’ may be used to rank the habitat type.

The following ranking system should be used:

A

:

excellent representativity,

B:

:

good representativity,

C:

:

significant representativity.

Furthermore, all cases where a habitat type is present on the site in question in a nonsignificant manner must be indicated in a fourth category:

D

:

non-significant presence.

In cases where the site representativity for the habitat type concerned is classed ‘D: non-significant’, no other indication is required for the other evaluation criteria concerning this habitat type on the site in question. In these cases the criteria ‘Relative surface’, ‘Conservation status’ and ‘Global evaluation’should not be marked.

—   RELATIVE SURFACE: = A(b) of Annex III: Area of the site covered by the natural habitat type in relation to the total area covered by that natural habitat type within the national territory.

Theoretically, to assess criterion A(b) one needs to measure the surface covered by the habitat type in the site, and the total surface of the national territory that is covered by the same habitat type. Although this is evident, it can be extremely difficult to make these measurements, especially those concerning the reference national surface.

This criterion should be expressed as a percentage ‘p’. Whether the two measures exist or can be obtained (and the percentage can therefore be calculated) or that the result arises from an estimation according to the best judgement (which is the more likely situation) an evaluation of ‘p’ in class intervals should be made using the following progressive model.

A

:

100 ≥ p > 15 %

B

:

15 ≥ p > 2 %

C

:

2 ≥ p > 0 %

—   CONSERVATION STATUS: = A(c) of Annex III: Degree of conservation of the structure and functions of the natural habitat type, concerned and restoration possibilities

This criterion comprises three sub-criteria:

(i)

degree of conservation of the structure,

(ii)

degree of conservation of the functions,

(iii)

restoration possibility.

Although the above sub-criteria could be evaluated separately, they should nonetheless be combined for the requirements of selection of sites proposed on the national list as they have a complex and interdependent influence on the process.

(i)   Degree of conservation of structure

This sub-criterion should be linked to the interpretation manual on Annex I habitats since this manual provides a definition, a list of characteristic species and other relevant elements.

Comparing the structure of a given habitat type present in the site with the data of the interpretation manual (and other relevant scientific information), and even with the same habitat type in other sites, it should be possible to establish a ranking system as follows, using the ‘best expert judgment’:

I:

excellent structure,

II:

structure well conserved,

III:

average or partially degraded structure.

In cases where the sub-class ‘excellent structure’ is given the criterion A(c) should in its totality be classed as ‘A: excellent conservation’, independently of the grading of the other two sub-criteria.

In cases where the habitat type concerned on the site in question does not possess an excellent structure, it is still necessary to evaluate the other two sub-criteria.

(ii)   Degree of conservation of functions

It can be difficult to define and measure the functions of a particular habitat type on the defined site and their conservation, and to do this independently of other habitat types. For this reason it is useful to paraphrase ‘the conservation of functions’ by the prospects (capacity and probability) of the habitat type concerned on the site in question to maintain its structure for the future, given on the one hand the possible unfavourable influences and on the other hand all the reasonable conservation effort which is possible.

I

:

excellent prospects

II

:

good prospects

III

:

average or unfavourable prospects

In cases where the sub-class ‘I: excellent prospects’ or ‘II: good prospects’ are combined with the grading ‘II: structure well conserved’ of the first sub-criterion, the criterion A(c) should in its totality by classed ‘A: - excellent conservation’ or ‘B: good conservation’ respectively, independently of the grading of the third sub-criterion which should not further be considered.

In cases where the sub-class ‘III: average or unfavourable prospects’ is combined with the grading ‘III: average or partially degraded structure’ of the first sub-criterion, the criterion A(c) in its entirety should be classed as ‘C: average or reduced conservation’ independently of the grading of the third sub-criterion which should not further be considered.

(iii)   Restoration possibilities.

This sub-criterion is used to evaluate to what extent the restoration of an habitat type concerned on the site in question could be possible.

The first thing to evaluate is its feasibility from a scientific point of view: does the current state of knowledge provide an answer to the ‘what to do and how to do it’ questions? This implies a full knowledge of the structure and functions of the habitat type and of the concrete management plans and prescriptions needed to restore it, that's to say, to stabilize or increase the percentage of area covered by that habitat type, to re-establish the specific structure and functions which are necessary for its long-term maintenance and to maintain or restore a favourable conservation status for its typical species.

The second question that may be asked is the whether it is cost-effective from a nature conservation point of view?’. This assessment must take into consideration the degree of threat and rarity of the habitat type.

The ranking system should be the following, using ‘best expert judgement’:

I

:

restoration easy,

II

:

restoration possible with an average effort,

III

:

restoration difficult or impossible.

Synthesis: applying to the overall grading of the three sub-criteria

A

:

excellent conservation

=

excellent structure, independent of the grading of the other two sub-criteria,

=

structure well conserved and excellent prospects independent of the grading of the third criterion.

B

:

good conservation

=

structure well conserved and good prospects independent of the grading of the third sub-criterion,

=

structure well conserved and average/maybe unfavourable prospects and restoration easy or possible with average effort,

=

average structure/partially degraded, excellent prospects and restoration easy or possible with average effort.

=

average structure/partially degraded, good prospects and easy restoration.

C:

:

average or reduced conservation

=

all other combinations.

—   GLOBAL ASSESSMENT = A(d) of Annex III: Global assessment of the value of the site for conservation of the natural habitat type concerned.

This criterion should be used to assess the previous criteria in an integrated way and taking into consideration the different weights they may have for the habitat under consideration. Other aspects may be considered regarding the evaluation of the most relevant elements in order to globally assess their positive or negative influence on the conservation of the habitat type. The ‘most relevant’ elements may vary from habitat type to habitat type; they may include the human activities, both in the site or in its neighbouring areas, that are likely to influence the conservation status of the habitat type, the ownership of the land, the existing legal status of the site, the ecological relations between the different habitat types and species, etc.

The ‘best expert judgment’ may be used to assess this global value, and the ranking system used to express it should be as follows:

A:

:

excellent value,

B:

:

good value,

C:

:

significant value.

3.2.   Species referred to in Article 4 of Directive 79/409/EEC and species listed in Annex II to Directive 92/43/EEC and site evaluation for them

(i)   Code, name and population data on species

For sites as appropriate enter the scientific name of all bird species relevant for Article 4 (1) and 4 (2) of Council Directive 79/409/EEC, and of all fauna and flora species listed on Annex II of Council Directive 92/43/EEC that occur at the site with an indication of their population within the site (see below). Each relevant species is also to be indicated by a four character sequential code taken from Appendix C, including all migratory bird species, linked to Article 4 (2) of Council Directive 79/409/EEC.

As a number of fauna species, in particular many bird species, are migratory the site may be important for different aspects of the life cycle of species. These are categorized below:

Resident:

to be found throughout the year on the site,

Breeding/reproducing:

uses the site to nest and raise young,

Staging:

site used on migration or for moulting outside the breeding grounds,

Wintering:

uses the site during the winter.

Where a non-resident population is to be found at a site in more than one season entries should be made in the appropriate fields.

As regards abundance, always enter exact population data where known. Where an exact number is not known give population range in which it falls (1-5, 6-10, 11-50, 51-100, 101-250, 251-500, 501-1 000, 1 001-10 000, > 10 000). Where a population range is not known but information exists on minimum or maximum population size, indicate abundance by < (less than) or > (greater than). Indicate with a suffix whether the population value is pairs (p) or individuals (i). For some species with specialized breeding systems, counts may be of males and females separately: these could be suffixed (m) or (f) respectively. In particular for mammals, amphibians/reptiles and fishes no numeric information might be available at all. In this case note the population size/density by indicating whether the species is common (C), rare (R) or very rare (V). In the absence of any population data indicate it as being present (P).

For invertebrates and plants in the few special cases where abundance of the species is known for the site, give population estimate or population range as given above. Otherwise indicate whether the species is common (C), rare (R), or very rare (V). In the absence of any population data indicate it as being present (P).

If, in the absence of any population data a site is still known to be of Community importance for a species, describe the character of the population in the site description text field ‘Quality’ outlining the nature of the population (e.g. dense, dispersed or isolated).

The following species groups are recorded separately: birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles, fishes, invertebrates and plants.

(ii)   Site assessment criteria for a given species in Annex II (in accordance with Section B of Annex III)

—   POPULATION: = B(a) of Annex III: Size and density of the population of the species present on the site in relation to the populations present within national territory

This criterion exists to evaluate the relative size or density of the population in the site with that of the national population.

This last aspect is in general quite difficult to evaluate. The optimal measure would be a percentage, resulting from the ratio of the population in the site/population in the national territory. As proposed for criterion A(b) an estimate or a class interval should be used according to the following progressive model:

A

:

100 % ≥ p > 15 %,

B:

:

15 % ≥ p > 2 %,

C:

:

2 % ≥ p > 0 %.

Furthermore, all cases where a population of the species concerned is present on the site in question in a non-significant manner must be indicated in a fourth category.

D:

:

non-significant population.

In cases where the site representativity for the population concerned is classes ‘D: non-significant’, no other indication is required for the other evaluation criteria concerning this habitat type on the site in question. In these cases the criteria ‘Conservation’, ‘Isolation’ and ‘Global evaluation’should not be marked.

—   CONSERVATION: = B(b) of Annex III: Degree of conservation of the features of the habitat which are important for the species concerned and possibilities for restoration

This criterion comprises two sub-criteria:

(i)

degree of conservation of the features of the habitat important for the species;

(ii)

restoration possibilities.

(i)   Degree of conservation of the features of the habitat important for the species

Criterion (i) requires a global evaluation of the features of the habitat regarding the biological requirements of a given species. The features relating to population dynamics are among the most appropriate for both animal and plant species. The structure of the habitat and some abiotic features should be assessed.

The ‘best expert judgment’ should be used to rank this criterion:

I.

:

elements in excellent condition,

II.

:

elements well conserved,

III.

:

elements in average or partially degraded condition,

In cases where the sub-class ‘I: elements in excellent condition’ or ‘II: elements well conserved’ is given the criterion B(b) should in its totality be classed ‘A: excellent conservation’ or ‘B: good conservation’ respectively. Independent of the grading of the other sub-criterion.

(ii)   Restoration possibilities

For this sub-criterion, which only needs to be taken into account when the elements are in an average or partially degraded condition, an approach analogous to that of criterion A (c) (iii), should be used, adding an evaluation of the viability of the population under consideration. This should result in the system of grading as follows:

I

:

restoration easy,

II

:

restoration possible with average effort,

III

:

restoration difficult or impossible.

Synthesis applying to classification of the two sub-criteria

A.

:

conservation excellent

=

elements in an excellent condition, independent of the grading of the possibility of restoration,

B:

:

good conservation

=

elements well conserved independent of the grading of the possibility of restoration,

=

elements in average or partially degraded condition and easy to restore,

C:

:

average or reduced conservation

=

all other combinations.

—   ISOLATION: = B(c) of Annex III: Degree of isolation of the population present on the site in relation to the natural range of the species.

This criterion may be interpreted as an approximate measure of the contribution of a given population to the genetic diversity of the species on the one hand and of the fragility of this specific population on the other hand. Using a simplistic approach one may say that the more a population is isolated (in relation to its natural range), the greater is its contribution to the genetic diversity of the species. Consequently the term ‘isolation’ should be considered in a wider context, applying equally to strict endemics, to sub-species/varieties/races as well as sub-populations of a meta-population. In this context the following grading should be used:

A

:

population (almost) isolated,

B

:

population not-isolated, but on margins of area of distribution,

C

:

population not-isolated within extended distribution range.

—   GLOBAL = B(d) of Annex III: Global assessment of the value of the site for conservation of the species concerned.

This criterion refers to the global assessment of the value of the site for the conservation of the species concerned. It may be used to sum up the previous criteria and also to assess other features of the site thought to be relevant for a given species. These features may vary from one species to another and might include human activities on the site or in nearby areas which are capable of influencing the conservation status of the species, land management, the statutory protection of the site, ecological relations between the different types of habitats and species, etc.

A ‘best expert judgment’ may be used for this global evaluation, using the following ranking system:

A

:

excellent value,

B:

:

good value,

C:

:

significant value.

3.3.   Other species (to be supplied where relevant)

All other important species of flora and fauna may be subsequently entered, where they are relevant to the conservation and management of the site, according to the following procedure:

Tick the box of appropriate species group,

Provide the scientific name of the species

Give regular maximum population data for the species where possible. Where quantitative data do not exist indicate abundance semi-quantitatively or qualitatively using the notation outlined in Section 3.2.i..

Please indicate the motivation for listing each species using the following categories:

A. National Red Data list,

B. Endemics,

C. International Conventions (including Berne, Bonn and Biodiversity),

D. Other reasons.

Further details on the motivations for listing individual species, especially regarding D, can be given in Section 4.2 which is the free-text field for describing the quality and importance of the site).

The codes of Appendix III are not used here, nor is there any site assessment for the species.

4.   SITE DESCRIPTION

This section is principally for free-text description of key-site characteristics which has two purposes:

to allow key information to be recorded which is inadequately represented in the code list,

to provide a concise and structural description of the site when details are being displayed.

4.1.   General site character (obligatory)

This field should provide an overall ‘picture’ of the site. Summarize the broad characteristics of the site starting with an indication of the site's division into broad habitat classes using best expert judgment to estimate their percentage cover (these habitat classes are pre-formulated in the corresponding field). The total cover of habitat classes should be 100 % and correspond to the total surface area of the site.

The main geological, geomorphological and landscape features of importance should be described here. Where relevant indicate the dominant vegetation types. Also mention other non-Annex I habitats important for the conservation of the site. Where further detailed breakdown of the information on habitat classes is important for the conservation of the site (e.g. whether dehesas or vineyards) this should be given in the free text section called other site characteristics. Information on small linear and mosaic-type wooded areas (hedges, bocage, tree lines) should also be provided under this general text.

4.2.   Quality and importance (obligatory)

Enter the overall indication of the quality and importance of the site, in view of the conservation objectives of the directives.

For internationally important wetlands that regularly hold 20 000 waterfowl this fact should be entered here.

Where a species is listed in Section 3.3 with motivation D, outline the basis for its inclusion.

4.3.   Vulnerability (obligatory)

Indicate the nature and extent of pressures upon the site from human and other influences and the fragility of habitats and ecosystems found there. This field should include a description of important elements not adequately covered by the coded data contained in section 6.1.

4.4.   Site designation (to be supplied where relevant)

Enter as free text any aspect of the site designation that is not adequately covered by the codes used in site designation codes fields (see Section 5).

4.5.   Ownership (to be supplied where relevant)

Enter a general description of the site ownership (e.g. ‘private’; ‘state’, ‘conservation NGO’). If possible include an estimate of the proportion of the site area in each ownership class.

4.6.   Documentation (to be supplied where relevant)

If available, for each site reference is made to relevant publications and/or scientific data concerning the site. Information entering should be made according to standard convention for scientific references. Unpublished or communications, referring to the information given in the recording form, should be included wherever useful.

4.7.   History (not to be filled in)

This field will be used by the competent Commission service to maintain a log of the stages by which the current site record developed. Examples of the information to be recorded include:

initial notification,

correction of errors,

changes resulting from actual physical changes in the site.

In each case, the history field comprises three sub-fields which are:

the date of the change,

name of the field that is being changed,

a description outlining the changes that have been made,

5.   SITE PROTECTION AND RELATION WITH CORINE BIOTOPE SITES

With regard to the recorded relationships indicated in 5.1 and 5.2 below, a map clearly showing the boundaries of these related sites must be delivered (see Section 7 of explanatory notes for further clarification on this)

5.1.   Protection status at national and regional level (Appendix D) (obligatory)

For each Member State, Appendix D contains a sequential list of the relevant nature conservation designation types which have statutory protection with their definition from the national/regional level. Three list of protection types cover the following three categories:

A.

Designation types used with the intention to protect fauna, flora, habitats and landscapes (the latter as far as relevant for fauna, flora and for habitat protection);

B.

Statutes under sectorial, particularly forestry, legislative and administrative acts providing an adequate protection relevant for fauna, flora and habitat conservation;

C.

Private statute providing durable protection for fauna, flora or habitats. Protection types are ranked by strictness of protection starting the strictest statutes.

Where there is no protection status for the site it is important to indicate this by using the national code corresponding to ‘No protection status’

For each site the codes of the appropriate designation types are to be entered, together with the % cover within the site for each designation type. The information stored in this field is on the level of the different designation types. If several nature reserves of the same type are included in the recorded site, the percentage of the total area covered by these reserves is to be entered.

The relation of individual designated areas with the site is recorded separately (see 5.2).

5.2.   Sites to which this site is related (neighbouring sites and sites belonging to different designation types) (to be supplied where relevant)

This part of the recording form allows neighbouring sites or sites belonging to different designation types which overlap or neighbour each other to be indicated. The interrelationship between the different types is also established by cross-referencing them. All possible relationships are coded using one of the following:

types are coincident (use code =),

the described site includes another site completely (use code +),

the other site includes the described site completely (use code -),

the two sites partially overlap (use code *).

In addition to entering these codes, the percentage of the described site that is overlapping with the other site should be entered.

Neighbouring sites are indicated with a ‘/’.

In addition, the form provides for possible designation types on the international level (e.g.. Ramsar, biogenetic, European diploma, Barcelona, biosphere, World Heritage) and first some open text fields in which national designations with the name of the site can be mentioned together with the type of relation an % overlap with reference to the described site. This permits cross-referencing with the designated areas database.

5.3.   Relationship with Corine biotope sites (to be supplied where relevant)

For all described sites which overlap with Corine biotope sites, record the Corine site code, the type of overlap (using notation as in 5.2.) and the percentage of the described site that is overlapping with the Corine site.

6.   INFORMATION ON IMPACTS AND ACTIVITIES. IN AND AROUND THE SITE

6.1.   General impacts and proportion of the surface area of the site affected (Appendix E) (to be supplied where relevant)

Impacts relate to all human activities and natural process that may have an influence, either positive or negative, on the conservation and management of the site (listed in Appendix E). Considering the impacts and activities within the site:

enter the appropriate codes from Appendix E,

indicate the intensity of their influence on the site using the following categories:

A: high influence

B: medium influence

C: low influence,

give the percentage of the surface area of the site affected by them,

indicate whether their influence is positive (+), neutral (0) or negative (-).

Also describe the impacts and activities in the surroundings of the site. The surroundings is the area where the outside impacts and activities may affect the integrity of the site. It will depend among other things on local topography, the nature of the site and on the type of human activities.

If there are relevant impacts or activities which are not included in this list, indicate them in the free-text field ‘vulnerability’ in Section 4.3.

6.2.   Site Management

Body responsible for the management of the site (to be supplied where relevant)

Enter the full reference including name, address and phone/fax of the authority and/or individual responsible for the management of the site.

Information on site management plans and practice, including traditional human activities (to be supplied where relevant)

A concise overview of the management plans undertaken or under preparation, with an agenda of actions. These should take into account the threats to the site described by the human activities in association with the vulnerability field (4.3.).

As already indicated in the introduction, information of this kind can in many cases be an important consideration when estimating the degree of success when evaluating the conservation measures proposed under LIFE or other financial instruments. Please cite any plans published.

7.   MAP OF THE SITE (obligatory)

By mapping site boundaries, information on the site can be more precisely spatially referenced. When digitalized data can be explored in the context of the wider environment, by means of digital overlay with other data layers (e.g. results from the Land Cover project, soils, water quality or physical planning data). This enables the data to be used in a variety of applications which require exact information about spatial relationships. For example, the data become much more useful as an aid to environmental impact assessment.

All sites must be drawn on maps of the same detail and quality as the official published topographic maps and meeting all the standards of the competent topographical institute with a scale of 1:100 000 or the nearest possible scale, with a line thickness smaller than 0,4 mm. Using this scale where several nearby sites occur the same map should be used for all sires.

If site boundaries are also available from a geographical information system, with reference to map series used for digitization, scale, map projection and parameters, these digital data should be accessible and information related hereto included in the form.

The areas corresponding to the main categories of designation having the highest degree of conservation must be drawn on a second map with exactly the same characteristics as the first map.

In addition, if available, an aerial photograph of the site is considered to be very useful to ‘understand’ the nature of the site.

8.   SLIDES AND OTHER PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIAL (to be supplied where relevant)

List of slides and other photographic material, sent in together with the form, with reference to subject, place and recording date. Although optional, it is very useful to have photographic material to ‘understand’ the general form of the site concerned, especially when problems or complaints arise for a particular site. In addition, these slides can be used by the Commission for information or educational purposes concerning the Natura 2000 network.

The number of the slide indicated in the form must also be given on a copy of the slide. With regard to all slides and photographs the author and copyright should also be provided.

NATURA 2000 NETWORK

APPENDICES TO RECORDING FORM

 

Appendix A:

List of all regions in European Union as defined by Eurostat in the NUTS-coding system

Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

Appendix B

Habitat types of Annex I of Directive 92/43/EEC

Code

Annex I code

P

Habitat type

1110

11.25

 

Sandbanks which are slightly covered by sea water all the time

1120

11.34

*

Posidonia beds

1130

13.2

 

Estuaries

1140

14

 

Mudflats and sandflats not covered by seawater at low tide

1150

21

*

Lagoons

1160

 

Large shallow inlets and bays

1170

 

Reefs

1180

 

Marine ‘columns’ in shallow water made by leaking gases

1210

17.2

 

Annual vegetation of drift lines

1220

17.3

 

Perennial vegetation of stony banks

1230

18.21

 

Vegetated sea cliffs of the Atlantic and Baltic coasts

1240

18.22

 

Vegetated sea cliffs of the Mediterranean coasts (with endemic Limonium spp.)

1250

18.23

 

Vegetated sea cliffs of the Macaronesian coasts (flora endemic to these coasts)

1310

15.11

 

Salicornia and other annuals colonizing mud and sand

1320

15.12

 

Spartina swards (Spartinion)

1330

15.13

 

Atlantic salt meadows (Glauco-Puccinellietalia)

1340

15.14

*

Continental salt meadows (Puccinellietalia distantis)

1410

15.15

 

Mediterranean salt meadows (Juncetalia maritimi)

1420

15.16

 

Mediterranean and thermo-Atlantic halophilous scrubs (Arthrocnemetalia fructicosae)

1430

15.17

 

Iberia halo-nitrophilous scrubs (Pegano-Salsoletea)

1510

15.18

*

Salt steppes (Limonietalia)

1520

15.19

*

Gypsum steppes (Gypsophiletalia)

1530

15.1A

*

Pannonic salt steppes and salt marshes

2110

16.211

 

Embryonic shifting dunes

2120

16.212

 

Shifting dunes along the shoreline with Ammophila arenaria (white dunes)

2130

16.221 -> 16.227

*

Fixed dunes with herbaceous vegetation (grey dunes)

2131

16.221

*

Galio-Koelerion albescentis

2132

16.222

*

Euphorbio-Helichrysion

2133

16.223

*

Crucianellion maritimae

2134

16.224

*

Euphorbia terracina

2135

16.225

*

Mesobromion

2136

16.226

*

Trifolio-Gerantietea sanguinei, Galio maritimi-Geranion sanguinei

2137

16.227

*

Thero-Airion, Botrychio-Polygaletum, Tuberarion guttatae

2140

16.23

*

Decalcified fixed dunes with Empetrum nigrum

2150

16.24

*

Eu-atlantic decalcified fixed dunes (Calluno-Ulicetea)

2160

16.25

 

Dunes with Hyppophae rhamnoides

2170

16.26

 

Dunes with Salix arenaria

2180

16.29

 

Wooded dunes of the Atlantic coast

2190

16.31 -> 16.35

 

Humid dune slacks

2191

16.31

 

Dune-slack pools

2192

16.32

 

Dune-slack pioneer swards

2193

16.33

 

Dune-slack fens

2194

16.34

 

Dune-slack grasslands

2195

16.35

 

Dune-slack reedbeds and sedgebeds

21A0

1A

*

Machairs (* in machairs in Ireland)

2210

16.223

 

Crucianellion maritimae fixed beach dunes

2220

16.224

 

Dunes with Euphorbia terracina

2230

16.228

 

Malcolmietalia dune grasslands

2240

16.229

 

Brachypodietalia dune grasslands with annuals

2250

16.27

*

Dune juniper thickets (Juniperus spp.)

2260

16.28

 

Dune scleorophyllous scrubs (Cisto-Lavenduletalia)

2270

16.29 x 42.8

*

Wooded dunes with Pinus pinea and/or Pinus pinaster

2310

64.1 x 31.223

 

Dry sandy heaths with Calluna and Genista

2320

64.1 x 31.227

 

Dry sandy heaths with Calluna and Empetrum nigrum

2330

64.1 x 35.2

 

Open grassland with Corynephorus and Agrostis of continental dunes

2340

64.71

*

Pannonic inland dunes

3110

22.11 x 22.31

 

Oligotrophic waters containing very few minerals of Atlantic sandy plains with amphibious vegetation: Lobelia, Littorelia and Isoetes

3120

22.11 x 22.34

 

Oligotrophic waters containing very few minerals of West Mediterranean sandy plains with Isoetes

3130

22.12 x (22.31 & 22.32)

 

Oligotrophic waters in medio-European and perialpine area with amphibious vegetation: Littorelia or Isoetes or annual vegetation on exposed banks (Nanocyperetalia)

3131

22.12 x 22.31

 

Oligotrophic waters in medio-European and perialpine area with amphibious vegetation: Littorelia or Isoetes

3132

22.12 x 22.32

 

Oligotrophic waters in medio-European and perialpine area with annual vegetation on exposed banks (Nanocyperetalia)

3140

22.12 x 22.44

 

Hard oligo-mesotrophic waters with benthic vegetation of chara formations

3150

22.13

 

Natural euthrophic lakes with Magnopotamion or Hydrocharition-type vegetation

3160

22.14

 

Dystrophic lakes

3170

22.34

*

Mediterranean temporary ponds

3180

*

Turloughs (Ireland)

3220

24.221 & 24.222

 

Alpine rivers and the herbaceous vegetation along their banks

3221

24.221

 

Subalpine willowherb stream community

3222

24.222

 

Alpine gravel bed community

3230

24.223

 

Alpine rivers and their ligneous vegetation with Myricaria germanica

3240

24.224

 

Alpine rivers and their ligneous vegetation with Salix elaegnos

3250

24.225

 

Constantly flowing Mediterranean rivers with Glaucium flavum

3260

24.4

 

Floating vegetation of Ranunculus of plane, submountainous rivers

3270

24.52

 

Chenopodietum rubri of submountainous rivers

3280

24.53

 

Constantly flowing Mediterranean rivers: Paspalo-Agrostidion and hanging curtains of Salix and Populus alba

3290

 

Intermittently flowing Mediterranean rivers

4010

31.11

 

Northern Atlantic wet heaths with Erica tetralix

4020

31.12

*

Southern Atlantic wet heaths with Erica ciliaris and Erica tetralix

4030

31.2

 

Dry heaths (all subtypes)

4040

31.234

*

Dry coastal heaths with Erica vagans and Ulex maritimus

4050

31.3

*

Endemic macaronesian dry heaths

4060

31.4

 

Alpine and subalpine heaths

4070

31.5

*

Scrub with Pinus mugo and Rhododendron hirsutum (Mugo-Rhododendretum hirsuti)

4080

31.622

 

Sub-Arctic willow scrub

4090

31.7

 

Endemic oro-Mediterranean heaths with gorse

5110

31.82

 

Stable Buxus sempervirens formations on calcareous rock slopes (Berberidion p.)

5120

31.842

 

Mountain Genista purgans formations

5130

31.88

 

Juniperus communis formations on calcareous heaths or grasslands

5140

31.89

*

Cistus palhinhae formations on maritime wet heaths (Junipero-Cistetum palhinhae)

5210

32.131 -> 32.135

 

Juniper formations

5211

32.131

 

Juniperus oxycedrus arborescent matorral

5212

32.132

 

Juniperus phoenicea arborescent matorral

5213

32.133

 

Juniperus excelsa and J. foetidissima arborescent matorrals

5214

32.134

 

Juniperus communis arborescent matorral

5215

32.135

 

Juniperus drupacea arborescent matorral

5220

32.17

*

Matorral with Zyziphus

5230

32.18

*

Matorral with Laurus nobilis

5310

32.216

 

Laurel thickets

5320

32.217

 

Low formations of euphorbia close to cliffs

5330

32.22 -> 32.26

 

All types

5331

32.22

 

Tree-spurge formations

5332

32.23

 

Diss-dominated garrigues

5333

32.24

 

Palmetto-brush

5334

32.25

 

Pre-desert scrub

5335

32.26

 

Thermo-mediterranean broom fields (retamares)

5410

33.1

 

Astralago-Plantaginetum subulatae phrygana

5420

33.3

 

Sarcopoterium spinosum phrygana

5430

33.4

 

Cretan formations (Euphorbieto-Verbascion)

6110

34.11

*

Karstic calcareous grasslands (Alysso-Sedion albi)

6120

34.12

*

Xeric sand calcareous grasslands (Koelerion glaucae)

6130

34.2

 

Calaminarian grasslands

6140

36.314

 

Siliceous Pyrenean grasslands with Festuca eskia

6150

36.32

 

Siliceous alpine and boreal grass

6160

36.36

 

Siliceous Festuca indigesta Iberian grasslands

6170

36.41 -> 36.45

 

Alpine calcareous grasslands

6171

36.41

 

Rusty sedge meadows and related communities

6172

36.42

 

Wind edge naked-rush swards

6173

36.43

 

Stepped and garland grasslands

6174

36.44

 

Alpine heavy metal communities

6175

36.45

 

Oro-Mediterranean stripped grasslands

6180

36.5

 

Macaronesian mountain grasslands

6210

34.31 -> 34.34

*

On calcareous substrates (Festuco Brometalia)(* important orchid sites)

6211

34.31

*

Sub-continental steppic grasslands

6212

34.32

*

Sub-Atlantic semi-dry calcareous grasslands

6213

34.33

*

Sub-Atlantic very dry calcareous grasslands

6214

34.34

*

Central European calcaro-siliceous grasslands

6220

34.5

*

Pseudo-steppe with grasses and annuals (Thero-Brachypodietea)

6230

35.1

*

Species-rich Nardus grasslands, on siliceous substrates in mountain areas (and submountain areas, in continental Europe)

6240

34.31

*

Sub-continental steppic grassland

6250

34.91

*

Pannonic steppes

6260

34.A1

*

Pannonic sand steppes

6310

32.11

 

With Quercus suber and/or Quercus ilex

6410

37.31

 

Molinia meadows on chalk and clay (Eu-Molinion)

6420

37.4

 

Mediterranean tall-herb and rush meadows (Molinio-Holoschoenion)

6430

37.7 & 37.8

 

Eutrophic tall herbs

6431

37.7

 

Humid tall herb fringes of watercourses and woodlands

6432

37.8

 

Subalpine and alpine tall herb communities

6440

 

Cnidion venosae meadows liable to flooding

6510

38.2

 

Lowland hay meadows (Alopecurus pratensis, Sanguisorba officinalis)

6520

38.3

 

Mountain hay meadows (British types with Geranium sylvaticum)

7110

51.1

*

Active raised bogs

7120

51.2

 

Degraded raised bogs (still capable of natural regeneration)

7130

52.1 & 52.2

*

Blanket bog (*active only)

7131

52.1

*

Lowland blanket bogs

7132

52.2

*

Upland blanket bogs

7140

54.5

 

Transition mires and quaking bogs

7150

54.6

 

Depressions on peat substrates (Rhynchosporion)

7210

53.3

*

Calcareous fens with Cladium mariscus and Carex davalliana

7220

54.12

*

Petrifying springs with tufa formation (Cratoneurion)

7230

54.2

 

Alkaline fens

7240

54.3

*

Alpine pioneer formations of Caricion bicoloris-atrofuscae

7310

54.8

*

Aapa mires

7320

54.9

*

Palsa mires

8110

61.1

 

Siliceous

8120

61.2

 

Eutric

8130

61.3

 

Western Mediterranean and alpine thermophilous

8140

61.4

 

Balkan

8150

61.5

 

Medio-European siliceous

8160

61.6

*

Medio-European calcareous

8210

62.1 & 62.1A

 

Calcareous sub-types

8211

62.11

 

Western eu-Mediterranean and oro-Iberian calcareous cliffs

8212

62.12

 

Central Pyrenean calcareous cliffs

8213

62.13

 

Liguro-apennine calcareous cliffs

8214

62.14

 

Southern Italian calcareous cliffs

8215

62.15

 

Alpine and sub-Mediterranean calcareous cliffs

8216

62.16

 

Eu-Mediterranean Greek calcareous cliffs

8217

62.17

 

Aegean calcareous cliffs

8218

62.18

 

Southern Greek montane cliffs

8219

62.19

 

Central Greek montane cliffs

821A

62.1A

 

Northern Greek calcareous cliffs

8220

62.2

 

Silicicolous sub-types

8230

62.3

 

Pioneer vegetation of rock surfaces

8240

62.4

*

Limestone pavements

8310

65

 

Caves not open to the public

8320

 

Fields of lava and natural excavations

8330

 

Submerged or partly submerged sea caves

8340

 

Permanent glaciers

9010

42.C

*

Western taiga

9110

41.11

 

Luzulo-Fagetum beech forests

9120

41.12

 

Beech forests with Ilex and Taxus, rich in epiphytes (Ilici-Fagion)

9130

41.13

 

Asperulo-Fagetum beech forests

9140

41.15

 

Subalpine beech woods with Acer and Rumex arifolius

9150

41.16

 

Calcareous beech forests (Cephalanthero-Fagion)

9160

41.24

 

Stellario-Carpinetum oak-hornbeam forests

9170

41.26

 

Galio-Carpinetum oak-hornbeam forests

9180

41.4

*

Tilio-Acerion ravine forests

9190

41.51

 

Old acidophilous oak woods with Quercus robur on sandy plains

91A0

41.53

 

Old oak woods with Ilex and Blechnum in British Isles

91B0

41.86

 

Fraxinus angustifolia woods

91C0

42,51

*

Caledonian forest

91D0

44.A1 -> 44.A4

*

Bog woodland

91D1

44.A1

*

Sphagnum birch woods

91D2

44.A2

*

Scots pine bog woods

91D3

44.A3

*

Mountain pine bog woods

91D4

44.A4

*

Sphagnum spruce woods

91

44.3

*

Residual alluvial forests (Alnion glutinoso-incanae)

91F0

44.4

 

Mixed oak-elm-ash forests of great rivers

91G0

41.2B

*

Pannonic oak-hornbeam forests

91H0

41.7374

*

Pannonian white-oak woods

91I0

41.7A

*

Euro-Siberian steppe oak woods

9210

41.181

*

Apennine beech forests with Taxus and Ilex

9220

41.184

*

Apennine beech forests with Abies alba and beech forests with Abies nebrodensis

9230

41.6

 

Galicio-Portuguese oak woods with Quercus robur and Quercus pyrenaica

9240

41.77

 

Quercus faginea woods (Iberian Peninsula)

9250

41.85

 

Quercus trojana woods (Italy and Greece)

9260

41.9

 

Chestnut woods

9270

41.1A X 42.17

 

Hellenic beech forests with Abies borisii-regis

9280

41.1B

 

Quercus frainetto woods

9290

42.A1

 

Cypress forests (Acero-Cupression)

92A0

44.17

 

Salix alba and Populus alba galleries

92B0

44.52

 

Riparian formations on intermittent Mediterranean water courses with Rhododendron ponticum, Salix and others

92C0

44.7

 

Oriental plane woods (Platanion orientalis)

92D0

44.8

 

Thermo-Mediterranean riparian galleries (Nerio-Tamariceteae) and south-west Iberian Peninsula riparian galleries (Securinegion tinctoriae)

9310

41.7C

 

Cretan Quercus brachyphylla forests

9320

45.1

 

Olea and Ceratonia forests

9330

45.2

 

Quercus suber forests

9340

45.3

 

Quercus ilex forests

9350

45.5

 

Quercus macrolepis forests

9360

45.61 -> 45.63

*

Macaronesian laurel forests (Laurus, Ocotea)

9361

45.61

*

Azorean laurisilvas

9362

45.62

*

Madeiran laurisilvas

9363

45.63

*

Canarian laurisilvas

9370

45.7

*

Palm groves of Phoenix

9380

45.8

 

Forests of Ilex aquifolium

9410

42.21 -> 42.23

 

Acidophilous forests (Vaccinio-Piceetea)

9411

42.21

 

Sub-alpine spruce forests of the Alps

9412

42.22

 

Montane spruce forests of the inner Alps

9413

42.23

 

Subalpine hercynian forests

9420

42.31 & 42.32

 

Alpine forests with larch and Pinus cembra

9421

42.31

 

Eastern siliceous larch and arolla forests

9422

42.32

 

Eastern calcicolous larch and arolla forests

9430

42.4

*

Pinus uncinata forests (*on gypsum or limestone)

9510

42.14

*

Appenine Abies alba and Picea excelsa forests

9520

42.19

 

Abies pinsapo forests

9530

42.61 -> 42.66

*

Mediterranean pine forests with endemic black pines

9531

42.61

*

Italian Pinus nigra forests

9532

42.62

*

Greek Pinus nigra forests

9533

42.63

*

Salzmann's pine forests

9534

42.64

*

Corsican laricio pine forests

9535

42.65

*

Calabrian laricio pine forests

9536

42.66

*

Pallas's pine forests

9540

42.8

 

Mediterranean pine forests with endemic Mesogean pines, including Pinus mugo and Pinus leucodermis

9550

42.9

 

Macaronesian pine forests (endemic)

9560

42.A2 -> 42.A5 & 42.A8

*

Endemic Mediterranean forests with Juniperus spp.

9561

42.A2

*

Spanish juniper woods

9562

42.A3

*

Grecian juniper woods

9563

42.A4

*

Stinking juniper (Juniperus foetidissima) woods

9564

42.A5

*

Syrian juniper (Juniperus drupaceae) woods

9565

42.A8

*

Macaronesian juniper woods

9570

42.A6

*

Tetraclinis articulata forests (Murcia)

9580

42.A71 -> 42.A73

*

Taxus baccata woods

9581

42.A71

*

British yew woods

9582

42.A72

*

Corsican yew woods

9583

42.A73

*

Sardinian yew woods

Appendix C

Bird species of Annex I of Directive 79/409/EEC

Nowak code

Species name

Annex

I

II/I

II/2

III/l

III/2

A402

Accipiter brevipes

Y

 

 

 

 

A085

Accipiter gentilis

 

 

 

 

 

A400

Accipiter gentilis arrigonii

Y

 

 

 

 

A086

Accipiter nisus

 

 

 

 

 

A401

Accipiter nisus granti

Y

 

 

 

 

A298

Acrocephalus arundinaceus

 

 

 

 

 

A293

Acrocephalus melanopogon

Y

 

 

 

 

A294

Acrocephalus paludicola

Y

 

 

 

 

A296

Acrocephalus palustris

 

 

 

 

 

A295

Acrocephalus schoenobaenus

 

 

 

 

 

A297

Acrocephalus scirpaceus

 

 

 

 

 

A168

Actitis hypoleucos

 

 

 

 

 

A324

Aegithalos caudatus

 

 

 

 

 

A223

Aegolius funereus

Y

 

 

 

 

A079

Aegypius monachus

Y

 

 

 

 

A247

Alauda arvensis

 

 

 

 

 

A200

Alca torda

 

 

 

 

 

A229

Alcedo atthis

Y

 

 

 

 

A111

Alectoris barbara

Y

 

Y

Y

 

A411

Alectoris chukar

 

 

 

 

A109

Alectoris graeca

 

Y

 

 

 

A412

Alectoris graeca saxatilis

Y

 

 

 

 

A413

Alectoris graeca whitakeri

Y

 

 

 

 

A110

Alectoris rufa

 

Y

 

Y

 

A203

Alle alle

 

 

 

 

 

A054

Anas acuta

 

Y

 

 

Y

A056

Anas clypeata

 

Y

 

 

Y

A052

Anas crecca

 

Y

 

 

Y

A050

Anas penelope

 

Y

 

 

Y

A053

Anas platyrhynchos

 

Y

 

Y

 

A055

Anas querquedula

 

Y

 

 

 

A051

Anas strepera

 

Y

 

 

 

A041

Anser albifrons

 

 

Y

 

 

A394

Anser albifrons albifrons

 

 

 

 

Y

A395

Anser albifrons flavirostris

Y

 

 

 

 

A043

Anser anser

 

Y

 

 

Y

A040

Anser brachyrhynchus

 

 

Y

 

 

A042

Anser erythropus

Y

 

 

 

 

A039

Anser fabalis

 

Y

 

 

 

A432

Anthus berthelotii

 

 

 

 

 

A255

Anthus campestris

Y

 

 

 

 

A258

Anthus cervinus

 

 

 

 

 

A257

Anthus pratensis

 

 

 

 

 

A254

Anthus richardi

 

 

 

 

 

A259

Anthus spinoletta

 

 

 

 

 

A256

Anthus trivialis

 

 

 

 

 

A226

Apus apus

 

 

 

 

 

A424

Apus caffer

Y

 

 

 

 

A228

Apus melba

 

 

 

 

 

A227

Apus pallidus

 

 

 

 

 

A425

Apus unicolor

 

 

 

 

 

A405

Aquila adalberti

Y

 

 

 

 

A091

Aquila chrysaetos

Y

 

 

 

 

A090

Aquila clanga

Y

 

 

 

 

A404

Aquila heliaca

Y

 

 

 

 

A089

Aquila pomarina

Y

 

 

 

 

A028

Ardea cinerea

 

 

 

 

 

A029

Ardea purpurea

Y

 

 

 

 

A024

Ardeola ralloides

Y

 

 

 

 

A169

Arenaria interpres

 

 

 

 

 

A222

Asio flammeus

Y

 

 

 

 

A221

Asio otus

 

 

 

 

 

A218

Athene noctua

 

 

 

 

 

A059

Aythya ferina

 

Y

 

 

Y

A061

Aythya fuligula

 

Y

 

 

Y

A062

Aythya marila

 

 

Y

 

Y

A060

Aythya nyroca

Y

 

 

 

 

A263

Bombycilla garrulus

 

 

 

 

 

A104

Bonasa bonasia

Y

 

Y

 

 

A021

Botaurus stellaris

Y

 

 

 

 

A046

Branta bernicla

 

 

Y

 

 

A044

Branta canadensis

 

Y

 

 

 

A045

Branta leucopsis

Y

 

 

 

 

A396

Branta ruficollis

Y

 

 

 

 

A215

Bubo bubo

Y

 

 

 

 

A025

Bubulcus ibis

 

 

 

 

 

A452

Bucanetes githagineus

Y

 

 

 

 

A067

Bucephala clangula

 

 

Y

 

 

A387

Bulweria bulwerii

Y

 

 

 

 

A133

Burhinus oedicnemus

Y

 

 

 

 

A087

Buteo buteo

 

 

 

 

 

A088

Buteo lagopus

 

 

 

 

 

A403

Buteo rufinus

Y

 

 

 

 

A243

Calandrella brachydactyla

Y

 

 

 

 

A431

Calandrella rufescens

 

 

 

 

 

A374

Calcarius lapponicus

 

 

 

 

 

A144

Calidris alba

 

 

 

 

 

A149

Calidris alpina

 

 

 

 

 

A143

Calidris canutus

 

 

Y

 

 

A147

Calidris ferruginea

 

 

 

 

 

A148

Calidris maritima

 

 

 

 

 

A145

Calidris minuta

 

 

 

 

 

A146

Calidris temminckii

 

 

 

 

 

A010

Calonectris diomedea

Y

 

 

 

 

A224

Caprimulgus europaeus

Y

 

 

 

 

A225

Caprimulgus ruficollis

 

 

 

 

 

A366

Carduelis cannabina

 

 

 

 

 

A364

Carduelis carduelis

 

 

 

 

 

A363

Carduelis chloris

 

 

 

 

 

A368

Carduelis flammea

 

 

 

 

 

A367

Carduelis flavirostris

 

 

 

 

 

A365

Carduelis spinus

 

 

 

 

 

A371

Carpodacus erythrinus

 

 

 

 

 

A202

Cepphus grylle

 

 

 

 

 

A268

Cercotrichas galactotes

 

 

 

 

 

A335

Certhia brachydactyla

 

 

 

 

 

A334

Certhia familiaris

 

 

 

 

 

A288

Cettia cetti

 

 

 

 

 

A138

Charadrius alexandrinus

 

 

 

 

 

A417

Charadrius asiaticus

 

 

 

 

 

A136

Charadrius dubius

 

 

 

 

 

A137

Charadrius hiaticula

 

 

 

 

 

A430

Chersophilus duponti

Y

 

 

 

 

A416

Chlamydotis undulata

Y

 

 

 

 

A196

Chlidonias hybridus

Y

 

 

 

 

A198

Chlidonias leucopterus

 

 

 

 

 

A197

Chlidonias niger

Y

 

 

 

 

A031

Ciconia ciconia

Y

 

 

 

 

A030

Ciconia nigra

Y

 

 

 

 

A264

Cinclus cinclus

 

 

 

 

 

A080

Circaetus gallicus

Y

 

 

 

 

A081

Circus aeruginosus

Y

 

 

 

 

A082

Circus cyaneus

Y

 

 

 

 

A083

Circus macrourus

Y

 

 

 

 

A084

Circus pygargus

Y

 

 

 

 

A289

Cisticola juncidis

 

 

 

 

 

A211

Clamator glandarius

 

 

 

 

 

A064

Clangula hyemalis

 

 

Y

 

 

A373

Coccothraustes coccothraustes

 

 

 

 

 

A422

Columba bollii

Y

 

 

 

 

A423

Columba junoniae

Y

 

 

 

 

A206

Columba livia

 

Y

 

 

 

A207

Columba oenas

 

 

Y

 

 

A208

Columba palumbus

 

Y

 

Y

 

A421

Columba palumbus azorica

Y

 

 

 

 

A455

Columba trocaz

Y

 

 

 

 

A231

Coracias garrulus

Y

 

 

 

 

A350

Corvus corax

 

 

 

 

 

A349

Corvus corone

 

Y

 

 

 

A348

Corvus frugilegus

 

Y

 

 

 

A347

Corvus monedula

 

Y

 

 

 

A113

Coturnix coturnix

 

 

Y

 

 

A122

Crex crex

Y

 

 

 

 

A212

Cuculus canorus

 

 

 

 

 

A134

Cursorius cursor

Y

 

 

 

 

A454

Cyanopica cyana

 

 

 

 

 

A037

Cygnus bewickii

Y

 

 

 

 

A038

Cygnus cygnus

Y

 

 

 

 

A036

Cygnus olor

 

 

Y

 

 

A253

Delichon urbica

 

 

 

 

 

A239

Dendrocopos leucotos

Y

 

 

 

 

A237

Dendrocopos major

 

 

 

 

 

A427

Dendrocopos major canariensis

Y

 

 

 

 

A428

Dendrocopos major thanneri

Y

 

 

 

 

A238

Dendrocopos medius

Y

 

 

 

 

A240

Dendrocopos minor

 

 

 

 

 

A429

Dendrocopus syriacus

Y

 

 

 

 

A236

Dryocopus martius

Y

 

 

 

 

A027

Egretta alba

Y

 

 

 

 

A026

Egretta garzetta

Y

 

 

 

 

A399

Elanus caeruleus

Y

 

 

 

 

A447

Emberiza caesia

Y

 

 

 

 

A378

Emberiza cia

 

 

 

 

 

A446

Emberiza cineracea

Y

 

 

 

 

A377

Emberiza cirlus

 

 

 

 

 

A376

Emberiza citrinella

 

 

 

 

 

A379

Emberiza hortulana

Y

 

 

 

 

A382

Emberiza melanocephala

 

 

 

 

 

A380

Emberiza pusilla

 

 

 

 

 

A381

Emberiza schoeniclus

 

 

 

 

 

A248

Eremophila alpestris

 

 

 

 

 

A269

Erithacus rubecula

 

 

 

 

 

A139

Eudromias morinellus

Y

 

 

 

 

A101

Falco biarmicus

Y

 

 

 

 

A098

Falco columbarius

Y

 

 

 

 

A100

Falco eleonorae

Y

 

 

 

 

A095

Falco naumanni

Y

 

 

 

 

A103

Falco peregrinus

Y

 

 

 

 

A102

Falco rusticolus

Y

 

 

 

 

A099

Falco subbuteo

 

 

 

 

 

A096

Falco tinnunculus

 

 

 

 

 

A097

Falco vespertinus

 

 

 

 

 

A321

Ficedula albicollis

Y

 

 

 

 

A322

Ficedula hypoleuca

 

 

 

 

 

A320

Ficedula parva

Y

 

 

 

 

A442

Ficedula semitorquata

Y

 

 

 

 

A204

Fratercula arctica

 

 

 

 

 

A359

Fringilla coelebs

 

 

 

 

 

A448

Fringilla coelebs ombriosa

Y

 

 

 

 

A360

Fringilla montifringilla

 

 

 

 

 

A449

Fringilla teydea

Y

 

 

 

 

A125

Fulica atra

 

Y

 

 

Y

A126

Fulica cristata

Y

 

 

 

 

A009

Fulmarus glacialis

 

 

 

 

 

A244

Galerida cristata

 

 

 

 

 

A245

Calerida theklae

Y

 

 

 

 

A153

Gallinago gallinago

 

Y

 

 

Y

A154

Gallinago media

Y

 

 

 

 

A123

Gallinula chloropus

 

 

Y

 

 

A342

Garrulus glandarius

 

 

Y

 

 

A002

Gavia arctica

Y

 

 

 

 

A003

Gavia immer

Y

 

 

 

 

A001

Gavia stellata

Y

 

 

 

 

A189

Gelochelidon nilotica

Y

 

 

 

 

A033

Geronticus eremita

 

 

 

 

 

A135

Glareola pratincola

Y

 

 

 

 

A217

Glaucidium passerinum

Y

 

 

 

 

A127

Grus grus

Y

 

 

 

 

A076

Gypaetus barbatus

Y

 

 

 

 

A078

Gyps fulvus

Y

 

 

 

 

A130

Haematopus ostralegus

 

 

Y

 

 

A426

Halcyon smyrnensis

 

 

 

 

 

A075

Haliaeetus albicilla

Y

 

 

 

 

A093

Hieraaetus fasciatus

Y

 

 

 

 

A092

Hieraaetus pennatus

Y

 

 

 

 

A131

Himantopus himantopus

Y

 

 

 

 

A299

Hippolais icterina

 

 

 

 

 

A439

Hippolais olivetorwn

Y

 

 

 

 

A438

Hippolais pallida

 

 

 

 

 

A300

Hippolais polyglotta

 

 

 

 

 

A252

Hirundo daurica

 

 

 

 

 

A251

Hirundo rustica

 

 

 

 

 

A398

Histrionicus histrionicus

 

 

 

 

 

A418

Hoplopterus spinosus

Y

 

 

 

 

A014

Hydrobates pelagicus

Y

 

 

 

 

A022

Ixobrychus minutus

Y

 

 

 

 

A233

Jynx torquilla

 

 

 

 

 

A105

Lagopus lagopus lagopus

 

 

Y

Y

 

A406

Lagopus lagopus scot./hibernicus

 

Y

 

Y

 

A106

Lagopus mutus

 

Y

 

 

Y

A408

Lagopus mutus helveticus

Y

 

 

 

 

A407

Lagopus mutus pyrenaicus

Y

 

 

 

 

A338

Lanius collurio

Y

 

 

 

 

A340

Lanius excubitor

 

 

 

 

 

A339

Lanius minor

Y

 

 

 

 

A433

Lanius nubicus

 

 

 

 

 

A341

Lanius senator

 

 

 

 

 

A184

Larus argentatus

 

 

Y

 

 

A181

Larus audouinii

Y

 

 

 

 

A182

Larus canus

 

 

Y

 

 

A183

Larus fuscus

 

 

Y

 

 

A180

Larus genei

Y

 

 

 

 

A185

Larus glaucoides

 

 

 

 

 

A186

Larus hyperboreus

 

 

 

 

 

A187

Larus marinus

 

 

Y

 

 

A176

Larus melanocephalus

Y

 

 

 

 

A177

Larus minutus

 

 

 

 

 

A179

Larus ridibundus

 

 

Y

 

 

A178

Larus sabini

 

 

 

 

 

A150

Limicola falcinellus

 

 

 

 

 

A157

Limosa lapponica

Y

 

Y

 

 

A156

Limosa limosa

 

 

Y

 

 

A291

Locustella fluviatilis

 

 

 

 

 

A292

Locustella luscinioides

 

 

 

 

 

A290

Locustella naevia

 

 

 

 

 

A369

Loxia curvirostra

 

 

 

 

 

A370

Loxia pytyopsittacus

 

 

 

 

 

A451

Loxia scotica

Y

 

 

 

 

A246

Lullula arborea

Y

 

 

 

 

A270

Luscinia luscinia

 

 

 

 

 

A271

Luscinia megarhynchos

 

 

 

 

 

A272

Luscinia svecica

Y

 

 

 

 

A152

Lymnocryptes minimus

 

Y

 

 

Y

A057

Marmaronetta angustirostris

Y

 

 

 

 

A066

Melanitta fusca

 

 

Y

 

 

A065

Melanitta nigra

 

 

Y

 

Y

A242

Melanocorypha calandra

Y

 

 

 

 

A068

Mergus albellus

Y

 

 

 

 

A070

Mergus merganser

 

 

Y

 

 

A069

Mergus serrator

 

 

Y

 

 

A230

Merops apiaster

 

 

 

 

 

A383

Miliaria calandra

 

 

 

 

 

A073

Milvus migrans

Y

 

 

 

 

A074

Milvus milvus

Y

 

 

 

 

A280

Monticola saxatilis

 

 

 

 

 

A281

Monticola solitarius

 

 

 

 

 

A358

Montifringilla nivalis

 

 

 

 

 

A262

Motacilla alba

 

 

 

 

 

A261

Motacilla cinerea

 

 

 

 

 

A260

Motacilla flava

 

 

 

 

 

A441

Muscicapa latirostris

 

 

 

 

 

A319

Muscicapa striata

 

 

 

 

 

A077

Neophron percnopterus

Y

 

 

 

 

A058

Netta rufina

 

 

Y

 

 

A344

Nucifraga caryocatactes

 

 

 

 

 

A160

Numenius arquata

 

 

Y

 

 

A158

Numenius phaeopus

 

 

Y

 

 

A1 59

Numenius tenuirostris

Y

 

 

 

 

A216

Nyctea scandiaca

Y

 

 

 

 

A023

Nycticorax nycticorax

Y

 

 

 

 

A390

Oceanodroma castro

Y

 

 

 

 

A015

Oceanodroma leucorhoa

Y

 

 

 

 

A278

Oenanthe hispanica

 

 

 

 

 

A435

Oenanthe isabellina

 

 

 

 

 

A436

Oenanthe leucopyga

 

 

 

 

 

A279

Oenanthe leucura

Y

 

 

 

 

A277

Oenanthe oenanthe

 

 

 

 

 

A337

Oriolus oriolus

 

 

 

 

 

A129

Otis tarda

Y

 

 

 

 

A214

Otus scops

 

 

 

 

 

A071

Oxyura leucocephala

Y

 

 

 

 

A094

Pandion haliaetus

Y

 

 

 

 

A323

Panurus biarmicus

 

 

 

 

 

A328

Parus ater

 

 

 

 

 

A329

Parus caeruleus

 

 

 

 

 

A327

Parus cristatus

 

 

 

 

 

A443

Parus lugubris

 

 

 

 

 

A330

Parus major

 

 

 

 

 

A326

Parus montanus

 

 

 

 

 

A325

Parus palustris

 

 

 

 

 

A354

Passer domesticus

 

 

 

 

 

A355

Passer hispaniolensis

 

 

 

 

 

A356

Passer montanus

 

 

 

 

 

A389

Pelagodroma marina

Y

 

 

 

 

A020

Pelecanus crispus

Y

 

 

 

 

A019

Pelecanus onocrotalus

Y

 

 

 

 

A112

Perdix perdix

 

Y

 

Y

 

A415

Perdix perdix hispaniensis

Y

 

 

 

 

A414

Perdix perdix italica

Y

 

 

 

 

A072

Pernis apivorus

Y

 

 

 

 

A357

Petronia petronia

 

 

 

 

 

A018

Phalacrocorax aristotelis

 

 

 

 

 

A392

Phalacrocorax aristotelis desmarestii

Y

 

 

 

 

A017

Phalacrocorax carbo

 

 

 

 

 

A391

Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis

Y

 

 

 

 

A393

Phalacrocorax pygmeus

Y

 

 

 

 

A171

Phalaropus fulicarius

 

 

 

 

A170

Phalaropus lobatus

Y

 

 

 

 

A115

Phasianus colchicus

 

Y

 

Y

 

A151

Philomachus pugnax

Y

 

Y

 

 

A035

Phoenicopterus ruber

Y

 

 

 

 

A273

Phoenicurus ochruros

 

 

 

 

 

A274

Phoenicurus phoenicurus

 

 

 

 

 

A313

Phylloscopus bonelli

 

 

 

 

 

A315

Phylloscopus collybita

 

 

 

 

 

A314

Phylloscopus sibilatrix

 

 

 

 

 

A312

Phylloscopus trochiloides

 

 

 

 

 

A316

Phylloscopus trochilus

 

 

 

 

 

A343

Pica pica

 

Y

 

 

 

A241

Picoides tridactylus

Y

 

 

 

 

A234

Picus canus

Y

 

 

 

 

A235

Picus viridis

 

 

 

 

 

A034

Platalea leucorodia

Y

 

 

 

 

A375

Plectrophenax nivalis

 

 

 

 

 

A032

Plegadis falcinellus

Y

 

 

 

 

A140

Pluvialis apricaria

Y

 

Y

 

Y

A141

Pluvialis squatarola

 

 

Y

 

 

A007

Podiceps auritus

Y

 

 

 

 

A005

Podiceps cristatus

 

 

 

 

 

A006

Podiceps grisegena

 

 

 

 

 

A008

Podiceps nigricollis

 

 

 

 

 

A124

Porphyrio porphyrio

Y

 

 

 

 

A120

Porzana parva

Y

 

 

 

 

A119

Porzana porzana

Y

 

 

 

 

A121

Porzana pusilla

Y

 

 

 

 

A267

Prunella collaris

 

 

 

 

 

A266

Prunella modularis

 

 

 

 

 

A205

Pterocles alchata

Y

 

 

 

 

A420

Pterocles orientalis

Y

 

 

 

 

A386

Pterodroma feae

Y

 

 

 

 

A385

Pterodroma madeira

Y

 

 

 

 

A250

Ptyonoprogne rupestris

 

 

 

 

 

A388

Puffinus assimilis

Y

 

 

 

 

A011

Puffinus gravis

 

 

 

 

 

A012

Puffinus griseus

 

 

 

 

 

A013

Puffinus puffinus

 

 

 

 

 

A384

Puffinus puffinus mauretanicus

Y

 

 

 

 

A345

Pyrrhocorax graculus

 

 

 

 

 

A346

Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax

Y

 

 

 

 

A453

Pyrrhula murina

Y

 

 

 

 

A372

Pyrrhula pyrrhula

 

 

 

 

 

A118

Rallus aquaticus

 

 

Y

 

 

A132

Recurvirostra avosetta

Y

 

 

 

 

A318

Regulus ignicapillus

 

 

 

 

 

A317

Regulus regulus

 

 

 

 

 

A336

Remiz pendulinus

 

 

 

 

 

A249

Riparia riparia

 

 

 

 

 

A188

Rissa tridactyla

 

 

 

 

 

A437

Saxicola dacotiae

Y

 

 

 

 

A275

Saxicola rubetra

 

 

 

 

 

A276

Saxicola torquata

 

 

 

 

 

A155

Scolopax rusticola

 

Y

 

 

Y

A450

Serinus canaria

 

 

 

 

 

A362

Serinus citrinella

 

 

 

 

 

A361

Serinus serinus

 

 

 

 

 

A332

Sitta europaea

 

 

 

 

 

A444

Sitta krueperi

Y

 

 

 

 

A445

Sitta neumayer

 

 

 

 

 

A331

Sitta whiteheadi

Y

 

 

 

 

A063

Somateria mollissima

 

 

Y

 

Y

A174

Stercorarius longicaudus

 

 

 

 

 

A173

Stercorarius parasiticus

 

 

 

 

 

A172

Stercorarius pomarinus

 

 

 

 

 

A175

Stercorarius skua

 

 

 

 

 

A195

Sterna albifrons

Y

 

 

 

 

A190

Sterna caspia

Y

 

 

 

 

A192

Sterna dougallii

Y

 

 

 

 

A193

Sterna hirundo

Y

 

 

 

 

A194

Sterna paradisaea

Y

 

 

 

 

A191

Sterna sandvicensis

Y

 

 

 

 

A209

Streptopelia decaocto

 

 

Y

 

 

A210

Streptopelia turtur

 

 

Y

 

 

A219

Strix aluco

 

 

 

 

 

A457

Strix nebulosa

Y

 

 

 

 

A220

Strix uralensis

Y

 

 

 

 

A353

Sturnus roseus

 

 

 

 

 

A352

Sturnus unicolor

 

 

 

 

 

A351

Sturnus vulgaris

 

 

 

 

 

A016

Sula bassana

 

 

 

 

 

A456

Surnia ulula

Y

 

 

 

 

A311

Sylvia atricapilla

 

 

 

 

 

A310

Sylvia borin

 

 

 

 

 

A304

Sylvia cantillans

 

 

 

 

 

A309

Sylvia communis

 

 

 

 

 

A303

Sylvia conspicillata

 

 

 

 

 

A308

Sylvia curruca

 

 

 

 

 

A306

Sylvia hortensis

 

 

 

 

 

A305

Sylvia melanocephala

 

 

 

 

 

A307

Sylvia nisoria

Y

 

 

 

 

A440

Sylvia rueppelli

Y

 

 

 

 

A301

Sylvia sarda

Y

 

 

 

 

A302

Sylvia undata

Y

 

 

 

 

A004

Tachybaptus ruficollis

 

 

 

 

 

A397

Tadorna ferruginea

Y

 

 

 

 

A048

Tadorna tadorna

 

 

 

 

 

A107

Tetrao tetrix

 

 

Y

 

 

A410

Tetrao tetrix britannicus

 

 

 

 

Y

A409

Tetrao tetrix tetrix

Y

 

 

 

 

A108

Tetrao urogallus

Y

 

Y

 

Y

A128

Tetrax tetrax

Y

 

 

 

 

A333

Tichodroma muraria

 

 

 

 

 

A161

Tringa erythropus

 

 

Y

 

 

A166

Tringa glareola

Y

 

 

 

 

A164

Tringa nebularia

 

 

Y

 

 

A165

Tringa ochropus

 

 

 

 

 

A163

Tringa stagnatilis

 

 

 

 

 

A162

Tringa totanus

 

 

Y

 

 

A265

Troglodytes troglodytes

 

 

 

 

 

A434

Troglodytes troglodytes fridanensis

Y

 

 

 

 

A286

Turdus iliacus

 

 

Y

 

 

A283

Turdus merula

 

 

Y

 

 

A285

Turdus philomelos

 

 

Y

 

 

A284

Turdus pilaris

 

 

Y

 

 

A282

Turdus torquatus

 

 

 

 

 

A287

Turdus viscivorus

 

 

Y

 

 

A117

Turnix sylvatica

Y

 

 

 

 

A213

Tyto alba

 

 

 

 

 

A232

Upupa epops

 

 

 

 

 

A199

Uria aalge

 

 

 

 

 

A419

Uria aalge ibericus

Y

 

 

 

 

A142

Vanellus vanellus

 

 

Y

 

 

A167

Xenus cinereus

Y

 

 

 

 


Animal species of Annex II of Directive 92/43/EEC

Code

P

Species name

Annex

II

IV

V

1101

*

Acipenser sturio (Linnaeus 1758)

Y

Y

 

1120

 

Alburnus albidus (Costa 1838)

Y

 

 

1119

 

Alburnus vulturius

Y

 

 

1911

*

Alopex lagopus

Y

Y

 

1102

 

Alosa alosa (Linnaeus 1758)

Y

 

Y

1103

 

Alosa fallax (Lacepède 1800)

Y

 

Y

1187

*

Alytes muletensis (Sanchez & Androver)

Y

Y

 

1133

 

Anaecypris hispanica (Steindachner 1866)

Y

Y

 

1152

 

Aphanius fasciatus (Cuvier & Valenciennes 1821)

Y

 

 

1151

 

Aphanius iberus (Valenciennes 1846)

Y

 

 

1051

 

Apteromantis aptera

Y

Y

 

1130

 

Aspius aspius (Linnaeus 1758)

Y

 

Y

1092

 

Austropotamobius pallipes

Y

 

Y

1049

 

Baetica ustulata

Y

Y

 

1308

 

Barbastella barbastellus (Schreber)

Y

Y

 

1143

 

Barbus capito

Y

 

Y

1142

 

Barbus comiza (Steindachner 1865)

Y

 

Y

1138

 

Barbus meridionalis (Risso 1826)

Y

 

Y

1137

 

Barbus plebejus (Valenciennes 1842)

Y

 

Y

1188

 

Bombina bombina (Linnaeus)

Y

Y

 

1193

 

Bombina variegata (Linnaeus)

Y

Y

 

1085

 

Buprestis splendens

Y

Y

 

1078

*

Callimorpha quadripunctata

Y

 

 

1352

*

Canis lupus Linnaeus

Y

Y

Y

1372