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Document 32014R1143

Title and reference
Protecting biodiversity from invasive alien species

Summaries of EU legislation: direct access to the main summaries page.
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Dates
  • Date of last review: 19/06/2017
  • Initial creation date: 19/05/2015
Summarized and linked documents
Miscellaneous information
  • Author: Publications Office
  • Responsible entity(ies): Directorate-General for Environment
Text

Protecting biodiversity from invasive alien species

 

SUMMARY OF:

Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species

WHAT IS THE AIM OF THE REGULATION?

It sets out rules to prevent and manage the introduction and spread of invasive alien species (IAS)* in the EU.

This law seeks to minimise and mitigate the adverse effects of IAS on EU biodiversity and ecosystems, as well as on human health and the economy.

KEY POINTS

List of invasive alien species of Union concern

  • On 13 July 2016, the European Commission adopted its first list of IAS of ‘Union concern’.

    The list, which is developed on the basis of scientific risk assessments, is updated regularly and reviewed at least every 6 years. The list has already been updated once, with the adoption of additional species to the list on 12 July 2017.

  • Species on this list may not be intentionally brought into the EU’s territory. Nor may they be kept, bred, transported to, from or within the EU, sold, grown or released into the environment.

Permits

EU countries may issue permits to allow research, off-site conservation and medicinal use of the species listed as IAS of Union concern. For any other uses, EU countries wishing to issue permits first need to seek the Commission’s authorisation.

The IAS in question must be kept and handled in contained holding and transported under conditions that preclude their escape.

National action plans

Within 3 years of the listing of species, EU countries have to establish and implement action plans to address priority pathways. This is to prevent the unintentional introduction and spread of IAS of Union concern in their territory.

IAS of regional concern and native IAS

IAS may originate in one EU region and create issues in another EU region. Here, the Commission has a role to play in ensuring that the affected EU countries work together to deal with the problem.

Surveillance system

Within 18 months of the adoption of the list of IASs of Union concern, EU countries must establish surveillance systems which collect and record data on the occurrence of IAS in the environment.

Early detection and rapid eradication of newly establishing IAS

Any new observation (first observation or first observation after eradication) of a listed IAS in an EU country or in part of its territory leads to a rapid eradication obligation. Eradication can be achieved by lethal or non-lethal measures.

Management of widely spread IAS

Within 18 months of the listing of species, EU countries need to establish management measures for IAS that have already widely spread in their territory to minimise adverse effects.

These measures may be lethal or non-lethal and should remain proportionate to their impact on the environment and appropriate to the specific circumstances in the EU country.

Restoring damaged ecosystems

EU countries should carry out measures to assist in the recovery of an ecosystem that has been degraded, damaged or destroyed by an IAS of Union concern.

Transitional measures

People may keep their pets on the condition that:

  • they were acquired before the list was drafted; and
  • all appropriate measures are put in place to ensure that they cannot reproduce or escape.

In the first year after it has been listed, a business or other commercial enterprise may continue selling a species until stock is exhausted. However, in the second year following listing, a species may be sold or transferred to an establishment holding a permit or culled humanely. These transactions are allowed on condition that all appropriate steps are taken to ensure that the species cannot escape or reproduce.

FROM WHEN DOES THE REGULATION APPLY?

It has applied since 1 January 2015.

BACKGROUND

For more information, see:

KEY TERMS

Invasive alien species (IAS): plants or animals that have been transported outside their natural ecological range by humans (whether intentionally or unintentionally) into a new environment. While many of these species do not survive, some do and, due to their invasiveness, cause significant ecological and economic damage.

MAIN DOCUMENT

Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species (OJ L 317, 4.11.2014, pp. 35-55)

RELATED DOCUMENTS

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2017/1263 of 12 July 2017 updating the list of invasive alien species of Union concern established by Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/1141 pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 182, 13.7.2017, pp. 37–39)

Regulation (EU) 2016/2031 of the European Parliament of the Council of 26 October 2016 on protective measures against pests of plants, amending Regulations (EU) No 228/2013, (EU) No 652/2014 and (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council and repealing Council Directives 69/464/EEC, 74/647/EEC, 93/85/EEC, 98/57/EC, 2000/29/EC, 2006/91/EC and 2007/33/EC (OJ L 317, 23.11.2016, pp. 4-104)

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/1141 of 13 July 2016 adopting a list of invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 189, 14.7.2016, pp. 4-8)

Successive amendments to Regulation (EU) 2016/1141 have been incorporated into the original document. This consolidated version is of documentary value only.

Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2016/145 of 4 February 2016 adopting the format of the document serving as evidence for the permit issued by the competent authorities of Member States allowing establishments to carry out certain activities concerning invasive alien species of Union concern pursuant to Regulation (EU) No 1143/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council (OJ L 30, 5.2.2016, pp. 1-6)

last update 20.11.2017

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